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End already.
The simpsons has been going on for too long after the movie. The jokes are too predictable, the plot is overused, and the series in general is bland. Some people say South Park has been going on for too long, but have they LOOKED at the Simpsons? My point is, good before, the movie came, big hit, and it all started to go downhill from there just like Spongebob. I give it a 3/10.
  # comments: 20
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The MMORPG Episode
This is one of my favorite episode of the show. I daresay I even like it more than the World of Warcraft episode of South Park. The jokes were good and both stories of the episode were interesting in their own right. Here are some of my favorite lines:

Bart: I'm heading off to the Valley of Lagrimmar.

Marge: I'm going to bed.
Bart: But it's only 5:00 in the afternoon.
Marge: Who cares?! I'm dead!

Marge: Bart, you brought me back to life! (notices her character has goat legs) ...as best you could.

Now this was a good episode. :) It did have one drawback, though, in the form of this line: "I'm so proud of you, Mom. You're like Christopher Columbus; you discovered something millions of people knew about before you."

...Worst. Compliment. Ever.
  # comments: 19
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Raging Abe Simpson and His Grumbling Grandson in "The Curse of the Flying Hellfish"
This is my personal favourite episode of The Simpsons. It's as funny as one expects from an episode of the show, but it is also surprisingly well-plotted and heartwarming. The story is based on the "Hellfish Bonanza", a treasure trove of valuable paintings stolen in World War II. Abraham "Grampa" Simpson and Mr. Burns were members of the Flying Hellfish unit, which agreed that the last surviving member would inherit the treasure. Naturally, Mr. Burns, being the greedy Corrupt Corporate Executive he is, decides he will kill Abe for the treasure. One who is familiar with Abe Simpson will suspect him of telling his usual tall tales, and in fact his typical characterization is played with through Bart's embarrassed eyes, who of course doesn't believe him. However, when Mr. Burns comes along and steals the keys to the treasure from Abe's resigned hands, Bart is determined to make sure his more deserving grandfather gets the treasure.

The backstory is based on actual historical tales of stolen paintings in World War II, along with the concept of the "tontine". This learning experience elevates the plot into something enriching as well as entertaining. Also notable about this episode is Abe Simpson getting his character meaningfully fleshed out as opposed to being portrayed as a stereotypical Grumpy Old Man. He acknowledges that he is seen as a failure, but despite this, Bart shows his lesser-shown sympathetic side and encourages his grandfather. This ultimately makes the ending especially touching, as after Abe shows his inner badass against Mr. Burns, he tells Bart that he wanted to show him that he wasn't always a pathetic old coot, and Bart denies this self-portrayal. This is one of the many great family bonding moments of The Simpsons, and I would even go on to say this is the Crowning Moment Of Heartwarming.

With a well-developed plot, great action, and heart, this is one of the exemplary episodes of The Simpsons.
  # comments: 6
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See Homer Run
An amazingly underrated episode with lots of funny moments (the bit with the fridge magnet, Lisa's drawing about her soccer game, Milhouse getting run over off-screen) and a lovely ending with Homer and Lisa. And before you say it, the first act wasn't too mean-spirited!

5/5, A*
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Nearing 30 years, The Simpsons is still one of the funniest animated series on prime time television
The Simpsons- closing in on its 3rd decade of syndicated hilarity (and occasional disappointment), and there seems to be no end to this milestone-setting juggernaut. And why should there? Like its counterpart, Futurama, it can create some truly heartwarming and depressing moments that will set off massive Mood Whiplash, sometimes when you least expect it. The characters, despite some obvious Flanderization into the personalities everyone knows and loves, have potential to evolve beyond the status quo, taking what they learned throughout the course of the episode to overcome that episode's difficulties.

It is also capable to step beyond the limitations of a animated sitcom, capturing the heart and soul of the genre it parodies. The "Treehouse of Horror" episodes perfectly capture the essence of classic horror, sci-fi, and thriller movies. "Homer's Barbershop Quartet" perfectly reflects the rise and fall of The Beatles, while "Rosebud", as the name implies, retells Citizen Kane by replacing the title character with someone who is absolutely evil. Unlike most animated sitcoms out there, this one knows when to hold the punches, replacing one target with another and making their stereotypes seem less incompetent.

This is one of those rare series that can cope with an art medium that is constantly evolving. When it first started out in 1985, it was remarkably crude-the overbites were practically dangling over their lower jaws, the hair stuck out to ridiculous heights, whenever they laughed, their teeth seemed like they might fly out of their mouth, and the family themselves were massive. As time went on, the overbites were reduced, the characters shrunk in height, and the loose jaws were corrected. Now, the animation is starting to look more modern and fluid, despite copious amounts of Conspicuous CG. But, in time, that conspicuousness will naturally disappear as the animators get used to the new technology.

Over thirty years in syndication, and The Simpsons has made some milestones. It was the second prime-time animated sitcom to appeal to its adult audiences, since [1] in the 1960's. It has surpassed Last Of The Summer Wine and Gunsmoke in the longest-running prime time series in history, yet there seems to be nothing stopping it. And why not? Viva la Simpsons!

  # comments: 5
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Weirdest. Episode. Ever.
As we all know, The Simpsons quite often switches between satirical humor and zany humor, but for the weirdest humor, I nominate the episode "Smoke on the Daughter." It started off normally (for a Simpsons episode, that is), but towards the end, it got pretty bizarre. I thought the ballerinas' cigarettes had tobacco, not Mary Jane. Of course, to be fair, there's one line that I have to admit is funny because of its weirdness: "I hope Sleeping Beauty never wakes up." Boy that would be one awkward conversation to have on a date.

"Hey, Aurora, I got to be honest. A small part of me...sort of wishes that you never woke up from your magical sleep."
"You bastard!" (Armor Piercing Slap)

Overall, I'd give the episode a C+. The ending was, like I said, kind of out there, but for the rest, at least they tried.
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Season 2 in retrospect
Season 2 of The Simpsons, upon looking at it one more time, was quite possibly the most human and down to earth season in the simpsons history. It may not have been as polished as the golden years simpsons (seasons 3-8) in terms of animation or comedy, but the animation was a hell of a lot better than season 1 and the humour was still quite good.

However, my main focus is on the sheer reality of this season. Watching episodes like "Principal Charming", "Bart Gets an F", and "Bart gets hit by a car" among others made me realize that the simpsons, as funny as they were in the later seasons, never really revisited the kind of tragic pathos and moral dilemmas these characters faced.

I like this season because it was an excellent balance of humor and tragedy. These characters made you laugh, but made you care for them because you saw their vulnerabilities on display. Bart's a bad boy, but he hates being a failure. Selma is lonely, and Patty feels bad about stealing away her chance at love. I mean, the list goes on and on. Homer gaining his hair, Marge's dilemma between her loyalty to homer and breaking the law, etc.

But the maturity of this season can be seen with "Itchy and Scratchy vs Marge". The Simpsons were a very controversial series for the time, and THIS is how they responded to their enemies. Not mockeries or caricatures, but an insightful analysis over the morality (or lack there of) of tv and a thought-provoking issue over what can be seen as "art" and "filth".

I could go on, but i don't need to repeat myself. Season 2 was one of their best seasons because it was their most heartfelt season. Not too crude, not too zany, not too strange. Just the perfect blend of tragedy and comedy.
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Bart the Mother: Great Episode in a Troubled Season
Season: Ten

Showrunner: Mike Scully

Year:1998

Bart the Mother is one I remember well as a classic,although originally a Love It Or Hate It episode,time has very much vindicated it. It has all the heart and drama of an episode you would find in the stereotypical "Golden Age" from 1990-1998 as all the critics and hardcore fans will tell ya'. Admittedly they were right and that Season 9 was the last gold season.However they were wrong to call this season one of the worst and episodes like this one prove it (It's still better than the David Mirkin seasons)

It begins with Bart hanging out with Nelson for some odd reason,Marge being a JerkAss about everything and then Bart accidently killing a mother bird,and while some might consider it sappy,I consider it the one of the few times we see Bart's kind/tender side. But then Marge apologizes and helps Bart raise the two remaining eggs which is good Crowning Moment Of Heartwarming in a season fluctuating between Darker And Edgier and Denser And Wackier. These turn out to be lizards that eat other birds

The rest of the episode lives off of the Marge/Bart relationship which is one of the few of its kind not focused on Homer.But it also has a few good chuckles here and there such as the Fantasy Kitchen Sink segment where Bart gets judged by a flock of birds,and Homer falling down the stairs,and even the overly long list of predators mentioned by Skinner at the very end.

The characterizations are still like the Golden Age what with Lisa not being Al Jeans Black Hole Sue Author Avatar,Mike Scully for once actually putting Homer on the backburner and not a JerkAss,Bart gets his sensitive side shown,Marge is justified,and Troy Mc Clure makes his last appearence.The animation is superb to with the nice yellow,and the fluidity of the lizards Bart raises

This makes for an A,best episode of the season.

Final Note: Season 10 I'd consider troubled because this was where plot-lines began to repeat,Homer got heavily Flanderized, and most of the humor was low-brow.However even with it's stinkers like "Make Room for Lisa","When You Dish Upon a Death Star","Monty Can't Buy Me Love" and "Viva Ned Flanders",it still had episodes like these and they still outnumbered the bad (Wasn't the case the next season)

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