Seductive Mummy

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Believe it or not, this gorgeous girl has been dead for thousands of years.
It's difficult to believe nowadays, but fictional Egyptian mummies haven't always been the dusty, bandage-covered zombie analogues they are now. The first mummy fiction stories, written in the early 20th century, involved mostly female mummies, and they were portrayed as mysterious, sensual and seductive, taking on the forms of the beautiful women they were in mortal life, and sometimes playing the part of Femme Fatale.

Moreover, unlike vampires, succubi and other undead/demonic creatures who usually took on human forms and employed their seductive powers just to drain mortals of their life energy, mummies were much more human, being capable of love and other feelings, sometimes even good-natured and involved in genuine romantic relationships with human males. The origins of this cultural phenomenon are neatly explained by this essay; in short, it represented the "romance" between an archaeologist and the ancient civilizations discovered by him, the colonization of the East by Victorian Britain, as well as romanticization and sexualization of the "exotic" female.

The trope has been largely forgotten for the most of the 20th century due to the emergence of the classic "monster mummy" type, pioneered by Boris Karloff in the famous 1932 movie; however, it seems to be somewhat growing in popularity again nowadays. Subtrope to both Mummy and Boy Meets Ghoul; Sister Trope to Attractive Zombie and Cute Ghost Girl.

Examples

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    Anime and Manga 
  • Daily Life with Monster Girl: Being a Cute Monster Girl series, the MonMusu Collection endcard for episode 8 of the anime describes mummies as a zombie subspecies whose native environment keeps their bodies intact and protects them from decay, resulting in them looking like attractive humans with parts of their body in bandages. The downside is that their environment robs their skin of its moisture, so they need to take long baths to replenish it, supplementing it with the placebo measure of sucking the life-force out of young men.
  • A Certain Magical Index: Nephthys is an undead Egyptian girl with Stripperifically placed mummy bandages.

    Film 
  • The 1971 movie Blood From the Mummy's Tomb, based on Jewel of Seven Stars, is about the resurrection of the beautiful Egyptian queen Tera.
  • The Mummy: When Ahmanet is first resurrected she starts out as a dessicated walking corpse, but after devouring enough lifeforce from her victims to restore her body she becomes a Cute Monster Girl. She also tries to seduce the hero by sending him visions in which she appears as her once human self.

    Literature 
  • Played with in The Jewel of Seven Stars by Bram Stoker: Queen Tera is described as strikingly beautiful, even as a mummy. It is also possible that her spirit survived in Margaret, the main character's Love Interest, who is said to bear a striking resemblance to her.
  • Iras by H.D. Everett involves the main character actually marrying a mummy who turned into a beautiful woman.
  • Ma-Mee from H. Rider Haggard's short story Smith and the Pharaohs: Smith's discovery of her tomb was originally motivated by him being smitten with a sculpture depicting her. Later at night in the museum she comes to life as an attractive female. Smith is also revealed as a reincarnation of her lover Horu.
  • In My New Year's Eve Among the Mummies, the main character becomes enamored with a living mummy of the Princess Hatasou, and even agrees to become a mummy himself to join her (fortunately, this doesn't happen).
  • Julian Hawthorne's The Unseen Man's Story has the protagonist falling in love with the resurrected Queen Amunuhet, and eventually joining her.
  • Freaks: Alive, on the Inside! by Annette Curtis Klause centers on the main character's romance with a living mummy called Tauseret.
  • Don't Tell Mummy, one of the books in the Graveyard School series, has the main character, Park, meeting a mysterious and sarcastic girl called Morton, who turns out to be a living mummy. Nevertheless, they become friends by the end of the novel, and there may be subtle hints at this trope (especially given that Park chose to pursue the career of an archaeologist due to his encounter with her).
  • Anne Rice's The Mummy Or Ramses The Damned features some steamy mummy/human sex scenes, facilitated by a magic elixir that brings mummies back to life.
  • In Club Monstrosity series by Jesse Petersen, Kai is an attractive female mummy working for a cosmetics company.

    Live Action Television 
  • Ampata from Buffy the Vampire Slayer is a really tragic example: she has to drain life force from other people to sustain her existence, and she just wants to lead a normal life.
  • An Egyptian demon in Charmed had the ability to put his dead wife's soul into the body of a hot mortal woman, thus turning her into a seductive mummy. He targeted Phoebe and Paige for this vessel.

    Theatre 
  • The Mystery of Irma Vep has Princess Pev Amri, who seduces Edgar in the tombs. Revealed near the end of the play to have actually been a trick played by his wife, Enid.

    Video Games 

    Web Animation 
  • Sisters Cleo and Nefera de Nile in Monster High, as is the logical consequence of a Monster Mash doll toy line. Even their vanity is an important characteristic.

    Web Comics 
  • Parodied via a scene from Twilight in Penny Arcade when they predict what would follow up the vampire craze.
  • Parodied in this Oglaf strip, featuring a group of decaying, decrepit mummies posing provocatively and spouting bad pick-up lines.
    Mummy: I'm naked under this bandage.

    Western Animation 
  • Nefer-Tina from Mummies Alive!. One of the episodes involves her dating a living male.
  • Played With in Scooby-Doo! in Where's My Mummy?: Cleopatra first appears as a beautiful woman, before turning into a scary crone. It is later revealed that she was actually Velma in disguise, and there are hints at a romance between Velma and Omar.
  • Batman: The Animated Series: Thoth Kephera from the episode "Avatar." She held the secret of eternal life, and to those who enter her tomb, takes on this appearance to seduce men who come seeking said secret. When she drains their life, however, she is definitely not this trope.
  • Averted with Cleofatra in Gravedale High, she's actually a fatty nerdy girl, unlike other female students like Blanch (an Attractive Zombie) and Durze (a Gorgeous Gorgon). Yet in one episode Cleo does manage to seduce a Vincent-like monster celebrity.
  • Plastic Man's villainess Disco Mummy, as the name implies, is an attractive disco-themed Aztec mummy.

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