Author Phobia

Authors are people just like us, with likes and dislikes... and fears. Their dislikes may stem from an incident in their life, or, just a basic hatred, fear or phobia of something that will provide a genuine Berserk Button whenever it's mentioned in their presence.

Sometimes a creator draws upon their personal Nightmare Fuel in an attempt to make their villains more fearsome and intimidating. For instance, if the author as a child was bitten by a venomous spider and nearly died, as J. R. R. Tolkien was, they might make the Big Bad of their story a hideous Giant Spider. For them it can be a way to overcome their fears or tensions or to at least give it a new meaning by using it as a trope in their work. Other times they just use their personal hatred of something to provide an Aesop to inform their audience why they too should dislike this particular thing. Can result in Propaganda, Author Tract or Anviliciousness if treated too seriously or heavily. If audience members have no problems with the author's personal distastes it might result in Internet Backdraft, especially if it's treated unrationally or without much knowledge of the subject. For instance, if an author has a fear of gorillas he may write a story where his characters are attacked by a Killer Gorilla. As many biologists can tell you: gorillas really arent't vicious aggressive monsters who just randomly attack you. In such cases the author may be accused of being an Unreliable Narrator who just acknowledges people's prejudices about a matter or even makes his audience more frightened of stuff they originally weren't that anxious about.

Contrast Author Appeal. See also Based on a Dream and Single-Issue Wonk.


Examples:

Anime and Manga
  • Yukito Kishiro is afraid of a certain kind of butterfly, and so is his character, Gally. This is only mentioned once.
  • Frieza from Dragon Ball Z was based on nightmares that Akira Toriyama had as a child. He is by far the most nightmarish of that manga's villains as a direct result.

Art
  • H. R. Giger suffered from night terrors, recurring nightmares that are seen as a serious medical condition. He used these images in his art work , working through his sleeplessness as a way of overcoming his fears. They inspired the Xenomorph aliens in the Alien franchise. Giger also had a phobia for worms and snakes.
  • Salvador Dali once made a painting called Shirley Temple: the youngest canonized monster of our time, depicting her as a monstrous sphinx.

Comic Books
  • Creator Edgar P. Jacobs of Blake and Mortimer fell down a seven metres deep old well when he was two or three years old. It took half an hour before he was able to be brought back up.The experience resulted in a lot of scenes in his comic strip where characters fall into pits or are walking through underground locations.
  • Author Hergé of the 'Tintin series was forced to listen to his aunt singing opera arias when he was a child. It led to a strong dislike of opera music, exemplified in the character Bianca Castafiore, whose singing usually scares away everybody or makes glass break. He also suffered from recurring nightmares in which he was chased by a skeleton and everything turned white afterwards. After psychiatrical advice he decided to make an album that took place in a white environment: Tintin Tintin In Tibet. Not only did it become a highlight in his oeuvre: his nightmares went away afterwards.

Film
  • Peter Jackson used his own arachnophobia to measure the effectiveness of Shelob's design and animations for the Lord of the Rings films.
  • James Cameron wrote The Terminator based on a nightmare he had of a robotic skeleton emerging from a fiery explosion and coming after him. It's even referenced on the main Nightmare Fuel page quote. "From the director's nightmares to yours." However, Cameron was sued because the idea bore a resemblance to two Harlan Ellison-written The Outer Limits episodes, "Soldier" and "Demon with a Glass Hand". As part of the settlement, the credits of the movie now include the phrase "Acknowledgement to the works of Harlan Ellison."
  • Alfred Hitchcock had a fear of the police, due to an incident in his childhood where his father ordered a policeman to lock him up for ten minutes for being disobedient. As a result, Police Are Useless and Wrongly Accused were two of his favorite tropes.
  • A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984): Wes Craven named Freddy Krueger after a bully who harassed him and based his appearance on a disfigured hobo who scared him as a child.
  • Stanley Kubrick felt very paranoid about institutions, ranging from the government, the army, companies and secret organizations, a fear that runs through his entire work.
  • Mel Brooks: As a Jew he naturally hates Hitler. However he used his hatred of the man by frequently lampooning him in his films.
  • Ken Loach is very critical and angry about the British government, especially concerning how they mistreat the lower class and their policies in Ireland. The rest of his work also shows a strong distaste of Fascism, Nazism and other right wing totalitarianism.
  • Brazilian actor and movie director José Mojica Marins also got the idea for his famous horror movie character Coffin Joe by dreaming about it: ""In a dream saw a figure dragging me to a cemetery. Soon he left me in front of a headstone, there were two dates of my birth and my death. People at home were very frightened, called a priest because they thought I was possessed. I woke up screaming, and at that time decided to do a movie unlike anything I had done. He was born at that moment the character would become a legend: Coffin Joe. The character began to take shape in my mind and in my life. The cemetery gave me the name, completed the costume of Joe the cover of voodoo and black hat, which was the symbol of a classic brand of cigarettes. He would be a mortician."

Literature
  • J. R. R. Tolkien was bitten by a venomous spider in his youth in South Africa and narrowly escaped death. He claimed to have no memory of the actual events, but many of his works feature giant, malevolent arachnids, including the spiders of Mirkwood, Shelob, and Ungoliant.
  • Similar to Tolkien, C. S. Lewis was afraid of insects (stemming from a pop-up book that scared him as a child), a phobia that he would attribute to Lucy Pevensie in The Chronicles of Narnia. This phobia can also be inferred to be the reason why insects are rarely mentioned in Narnia, if at all.
    • Deconstructed in the Space Trilogy. The protagonist is pursued through caves by a diabolical enemy, accompanied by a giant centipede. But when the enemy is dispatched, the protagonist finds nothing horrible or even dangerous about the big bug. Or any other bug ever again. "All that he had felt from childhood about insects and reptiles died that moment: died utterly, as hideous music dies when you switch off the wireless. Apparently it had all, even from the beginning, been a dark enchantment of the enemy's."
  • Much of what HP Lovecraft wrote was motivated by his own nightmares and personal phobias. Among the ones less likely to evoke similar feelings in readers nowadays were his fears of non-white Anglo-Saxon people and miscegenation. And fish. He also had a lifelong fear of cold temperatures, encouraged by his frail constitution. This is partly why the oppressive atmosphere of At the Mountains of Madness is so effective.
    • He also was deeply afraid of the mental issues that plagued his family, leading to the themes of the horror of mental instability and one's family history coming back to haunt you.
  • Stephen King is known for writing about things that scare him personally.
    • In particular, Pet Sematary is full of Adult Fear and based on a real incident where King stopped his son from almost getting run over by a truck. He couldn't shake thoughts of what would have happened if he failed, and wrote a novel around it.
    • As with the Orwell example below, King's fear of rats appears again and again: "Nona," "Graveyard Shift," 'Salem's Lot and a section in IT are just a few examples that contain very chilling descriptions of rats.
  • Winston's fear of rats and its use against him in the Room 101 scene in 1984 was inspired by George Orwell's personal fear of rats. On a larger scale the novel itself was also the sum of all his fears about totalitarianism and especially the way language was used in propaganda.
  • Terry Pratchett and horses. Several of his Discworld characters have had similar internal monologs about considering horses four-legged masses of barely-restrained insanity.
  • J. K. Rowling transferred her arachnophobia to Ron Weasley and features some truly frightening Giant Spiders as recurring minor villains.
  • Mary Shelley was inspired to write Frankenstein when she dreamt of a pale student who brought a hideous corpse to life. Later critics have pointed out that Shelley wrote Frankenstein shortly after giving birth and losing her baby, which also informs Victor Frankenstein's journey of creation and repulsion.

Live Action Televion
  • Stephen Colbert in The Colbert Report warns his viewers about how bears are godless killing machines. Inspired by a phobia he had as a child of bears attacking him in his room.
  • Babylon 5: Londo's dream about standing on his homeworld and watching the sky fill with black, spider-shaped spaceships was based on a nightmare of J.M.S., the series creator. (Of course, JMS's dream, unlike Londo's, wasn't prophetic. We hope.)
  • Doctor Who:
    • The Third Doctor story "Planet of the Spiders" features Giant Spiders that jump up and latch onto people's backs, and they are horrible. Robert Sloman was a terrible arachnophobe.
    • The Fourth Doctor story "The Deadly Assassin", which the Fourth Doctor spends mostly being tortured, beaten to a pulp and drowned in a jungle has an added frisson when you remember that the writer Robert Holmes had fought in Burma while still a teenager. In addition, Tom Baker has a phobia of water (severe enough that he could only shower because he couldn't stand baths).
    • The Eleventh Doctor story "A Christmas Carol" involves flying sharks and fish. As a child, Steven Moffat had nightmares about fish that could swim through the air. It should be noted that the fish in the story are actually rather friendly and the Doctor even rides the shark at one point.
  • Terry Gilliam's dislike of totalitarianism and bureaucratism frequently shines through in his films, most notably Brazil.
  • Monty Python's Flying Circus: The show was developed to poke fun at stuff they all disliked, from the British class system, television, the police, the army, boring talk shows, homophobes,... to conventional comedy with a standard set-up and obligatory punch line.
  • Spitting Image: The main reason the show was created was to take the piss out of all the celebrities that irritated people, including their main targets Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher.

Mythology & Religion
  • In the past quite some religions have been misused to give people a reason to dislike, hate or fear someone based on a few lines that can be easily misinterpreted in the scripture. A historical example is the Antisemitism that was rampant for many centuries because some priests and popes used the fact that Jesus had been arrested on commission of some Jewish elders to justify violent measures against the Jewish population. All that while Jesus was Jewish by birth. Another example is that several medieval monks used the story of Adam and Eve to prove that all women were seductresses and should be considered possible minions of Satan. Open The Witch Hammer, a medieval book about witchcraft and you'll read pages and pages of misogynist commentary.

Music
  • Black Sabbath's titular song was written about a nightmare one of the band members had. Sabbath Bloody Sabbath was in turn inspired when they rented out a castle and spent time recording in the dungeons, which freaked them out.
  • The Sex Pistols: The band has frequently stated in interviews that their main motivation was to piss off everyone and everything that had irritated them up to that point: hippies, rock 'n' roll, pop music, Moral Guardians, the Royal Family, the class system, conformity, squares, poseurs,... Just listen to Never Mind The Bollocks, Here's The Sex Pistols.
  • Frank Zappa hated Country Music. Though he embraced most other musical genres "cowboy music" (as he would call it) was one of the few genres he generally despised. He spoofed it twice with his songs "Lonesome Cowboy Burt" from Two Hundred Motels and "Poofter's Wroth Wyoming Plans Ahead" from Bongo Fury. Other specific stuff he despised and mocked often in his work were hippies, love songs, the plastic people, Republicans, unions, Disco, Richard Nixon, the American government, American public schools, Ronald Reagan, drug users, televangelists, the Moral Majority, MTV, the PMRC, Pat Boone, 'Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band'', Michael Jackson,...
  • Thomas Dolby wrote "Flying North" about his fear of flying.

Theatre

Video Games
  • Chain Chomps came from an experience Shigeru Miyamoto had as a child, when a dog chased after him as he approached but stopped just inches from him because the dog was tied to a stake.
  • A particularly well-known example shows up in EarthBound, particularly in the form of the final boss, Giygas. According to Shigesato Itoi, the dialog Giygas says is based off a childhood memory of him watching what he interpreted to be a rape scene (actually sex-followed-by-murder scene) in a movie.
  • Mother 3 has Tanetane Island, in which the party hallucinates friends and family members attacking them and saying very disturbing things. Itoi said in an interview that his worst nightmare was his loved ones being evil.
  • In a variant of this, Scott Cawthon, the creator of Five Nights at Freddy's, has admitted that out of the four animatronics he finds Bonnie the creepiest, to the point of having nightmares about him while making the game. This is probably why, after Freddy, Bonnie gets the most attention in promotional material (including the trailer) and in the game proper there's an Random Event involving him making a Nightmare Face. Also possibly why new animatronic Springtrap's character design looks like a more gruesome Bonnie, to the point that people were calling it "Golden Bonnie" prior to release.
  • A subtle version in Winter Voices, and one that only comes into play during the later parts of the game. Rape is a very common element of many of the Heroine's nightmares, but it doesn't become glaringly obvious until Episode 4.

Webcomics