Headscratchers: Return of the Jedi

  • Plenty of stuff about the Special Edition has been complained about ad nauseam, but I'd like to throw in that the scene of the people on Coruscant celebrating the end of the Empire is just plain wrong. While it's understandable for Lucas to want to show everyone a Happily Ever After ending, the truth is that there's absolutely no way that the capital of the freaking Empire would behave that way. There would be an absolute lockdown by the Imperial troops at best, massive disruption and riots at the very worst. The time period between the Emperor's death and the takeover of power by the Rebellion would be one of chaos, not partying.
    • Plus there's no way in heck news could travel *that fast* to the Galactic core from a world out in the middle of nowhere, even with the technology used in the SW universe.
    • EU-Canonically, that's pretty much what happened. The happy partying was more rioty in other areas we didn't see, and practically the moment we stopped seeing the Coruscant Uprising, Stormtroopers and other Imperial forces moved in and brutally put down the celebrations and riots.
      • Specifically, in the X-Wing Series this is Castin Donn's greatest failure. His Rebel cell, on receiving the signal broadcast of the events of Endor, immediately hacked public viewscreens and displayed it. It was a counter to the propaganda and coverups they knew would happen immediately. The public went insane, and in one plaza the crowd pulled down a statue of the Emperor... and almost immediately stormtroopers came and fired into the crowd. Castin saved a baby whose mother had been shot before he could be trampled.
    • In response to the orignal poster's issue with the capital of the Empire behaving that way, they aren't happy about being that. They were the capital of the far nicer Republic less than a lifetime ago.
      • For a Real Life comparison, think Berlin 1990 rather than Berlin 1945.
  • 3PO, R2, and Luke have to knock on the huge door, get past the guards and the Major Domo to talk to Jabba. But Leia (as the bounty hunter) and Chewie on a Chain come in the side door, with a freakin' THERMAL DETONATOR?! And Jabba doesn't wonder how they got in there?
    • Bounty hunters and the like are Jabba's major clientele, so it's not surprising at all that a bounty hunter could get in. She might have been impersonating a regular at the place. Jabba doesn't wonder "how they got in there" because bounty hunters go in and out.
    • Also, Leia was bringing in Chewie- in other words, someone Jabba had placed a major bounty on. Of course Jabba's going to want to see her, so that probably smoothed things over considerably.
    • And apparently Jabba doesn't really mind that people come into his presence armed... he's expecting that, partly because he works with bounty hunters so much (who not only would take forever to disarm, but most likely wouldn't want to... do you want to be the guard that tells Boba Fett to leave his armor in a locker?), but partly because he thinks he's thoroughly protected. No one scanned "Boushh" for explosives because they just assumed he had explosives on him... the surprise was in the audacity of using them to threaten the mighty Jabba in the middle of his own palace.
      • That was also what impressed Jabba. The bounty hunter (Leia) was threatening to blow up the entire room, judging by everyone else's panicked reactions. Apparently a willingness to extract revenge even at the cost of your own life easily gets you on Jabba's good side.
  • The elite rebel commando unit headed by Han is making their way across the forest moon of Endor. They're going quietly in their camouflage gear. With an uncamouflaged bright, shiny gold robot. Smart.
    • One has to wonder how R2-D2 managed to get around. He's not exactly an all-terrain vehicle.
      • In ''Heir to the Empire" Luke remarks that you'd be surprised how far that little droid can get on his own.
    • They probably weren't actually expecting to meet much resistance until they got closer to the shield bunker. They were probably planning to have Threepio wait for them somewhere at some point, it's just that things came to a head earlier than that.
  • Why did Vader pick up Palpatine instead of breaking his neck with his one good hand? If he had enough time to pick him up then he had enough time to get a good grip around his neck and snap it. The Emperor dies and Vader gets to live.
    • Not enough time, maybe? Plus, the prophecy stated "Balance to the Force" which to the Jedi meant no Sith. Vader was a Sith, ergo he had to kill himself as well. It's Redemption Equals Death.
    • Word of God and other materials confirm that Vader was trying to throw himself down the shaft and grabbed Palatine in a Taking You with Me ploy but didn't quite have the strength to make it over than railing.
    • His son was being fried in front of his eyes, so he had to make a decision right then and there. He didn't have time to think things through, so he chose and chose poorly.
    • Considering that the emperor explodes causing huge amounts of energy waves to run up and down the shaft, merely snapping his neck might not be enough.
    • Telekinetically pulling Luke's lightsaber to his remaining hand and bisecting the Emperor would also have been a good choice.
  • The Emperor says that the plans to the second Death Star were leaked intentionally, to lure the rebels in a Batman Gambit and crush them. But in the end, Lando manages to destroy it without problems. If the plans were leaked intentionally, why didn't he leaked forged plans ? What kind of an idiot would show their opponent their true weakness when they can just as well lure them into attacking the strong points?
    • The Emperor was clearly overconfident, and thought that the Rebels would never actually get a shot at the Death Star. The plan entailed never letting the shield go down after all.
    • The "plans" that were leaked weren't the schematics for the Death Star, it was the location and the fact the the Emperor himself would be there.
      • Eh, even if the plans were forged it's not like the Rebels weren't going to not be able to work out the basic method of 'fly into open core, shoot core."
      • Yeah, but it would have taken them a while to find a convenient shaft on a station the size of a moon if they didn't know exactly where they were.
      • The superstructure was mostly open. Probably any shaft would have sufficed. And the second Death Star was basically a ballooned up version of the first, the plans for which the Rebels already had.
    • The plan required the rebellion falling for it. That requires a degree of authenticity, he's already got some discrepancies which are inherent in any deception, too many discrepancies and he risks tipping his hand. Even Palpatine cannot be completely certain he has the monopoly on the rebellion's information acquisitions systems, so he needs to make the bait attractive enough that the rebellion will have to take it, but it cannot contain too many lies and risk them pulling the thread and having the whole thing unravel. A lie is best clothed in truth after all, and he doesn't believe the shield can be penetrated or the great imperial fleet evaded.
    • There's also that the Rebels have a full set of plans for a Mark I Death Star. While design variations can reasonably be expected for the Mark II Death Star, making the leaked plans too obviously bullshit would have tipped the Rebels off... and since they have the original Death Star plans available for comparitive analysis, they're set up fairly well to spot any bullshit.
  • Shouldn't the presence of the Executor have tipped the Tydirium crew off that the Empire was waiting for them? It was only the biggest, most powerful thing in the Imperial fleet that could still get away with being called a ship, and it's being there doesn't put any crimp in their plans?
    • Pay attention to the briefing. One of the reasons they give for why this is the perfect time to strike is because they know the Emperor himself is going to be there. And the Executor is the Emperor's flagship. Of course it's going to be there.
      • Eh, the Executor's nothing special. (And it's Vader's flagship, not the Emperor's.) "There're a lot of command ships." Yes, General Solo, there are.
    • That's even more confusing. Wouldn't it follow that the Emperor would bring substantial backup to protect a supposedly incomplete battle station? I mean, he did, but it never occurred to the Rebels that he'd secretly be rollin' deep?
      • The LOCATION is secret, and the new Death Star is almost complete; also you have Vader in the introductory scene making Jarjarrod shit his pants by casually mentioning they are behind schedule AND that the Emperor is coming to oversee the final stages personally.
      • Plus, Palpatine is springing a trap; when the actual battle starts it is safe to assume the vast majority of the Imperial Starfleet is joining; but only with instructions to contain the rebel fleet and making sure they stay in the killbox; the Death Star is possibly already operational at full capacity even from the start of the movie, it's just not mobile yet. The Emperor does state that the battle station is FULLY operational when he taunts Luke. This means, all of its defense mechanisms are in place and working, their only "weak" point is the incomplete surface that would allow to navigate the super structure. Spreading the rumor that the Death Star is not yet completed IS the actual trap, and the bait is having the Emperor being there in person.
      • Secret projects don't usually have the entire sector fleet called in to protect them.
      • But the Emperor's whole plan revolved around it not being secret for very long. I can sort of buy the Rebels being desperate to strike a fatal blow, but without a single "This is too good to be true"? Where was the "That's impossible, even for a computer" guy? Oh, wait...that was Wedge?!
      • Now you're confusing me. You'd prefer that the rebels found out about the secret project by finding out that the entire sector fleet was protecting it, making it unassailable? What's the point there?
      • Not at all; I'm just saying it's weird that the Rebels didn't even consider that it might be a trap, given the Empire's track record of deception, and that they considered the Executor and it's accompanying squadron, plus a nigh-impenetrable energy shield, "relatively unguarded."
      • Perhaps the Rebels believed that, for even a secret project, the Executor and its escorts would be considered sufficient protection by Imperial Command. After all, Imperial doctrine says that even a single Star Destroyer is enough to subject an entire star system. Also, at this time, there were four other Super Star Destroyers in active service.
      • It's not like the Rebels only sent a couple of squadrons on this one like they did at Yavin. They mustered together what was, until the Emperor sprung his trap, the largest fleet of ships we had seen in the entire series. The plan was to jump in, send in Lando's team to dive into the Death Star's core before the Imperials could react to the shield being down, and then wail on the Executor and her escorts. The plan was for the whole op to be done and them on the way out before reinforcements could arrive, assuming that the Imperials based their strategy around the assumption that any attacking force would be delayed by the shield.
      • Not to mention that the best-laid traps are ones that your enemy can't ignore. If the Rebels don't attack the Death Star, Palpatine gets a new invulnerable Death Star and the Rebels are screwed. If they do attack, they fall into the trap and the Rebels are screwed. Really, it's a bit of a Xanatos Gambit, where the Empire wins either way.
  • The entire movie would have been a lot shorter if the Emperor had remembered that if you are deliberately leaking the access code to the enemy, you can just write down which code you gave them and make sure nobody else is using it, so that the enemy will be automatically identified when they show up. As for the logistics of doing this without risking the Rebels figuring it out? We saw in the movie that the Rebels had no idea whether or not their code was still good until they actually tried it out, so, one bunch of alphanumeric squiggles looks much like another. Also, the bridge crew of the Executor would not need to be told anything about the plot; merely leave a notation in their logbook that "If this particular ID code shows up, call Lord Vader at once. Yes, even if its the middle of the night. Trust me, however afraid you are he'll kill you if you wake him up is nowhere near as slowly and horribly you'll die if you don't. Signed, The Emperor. PS: Don't lower the shield until and unless you are personally told to by either Lord Vader or me."
    • The trap was to lure the entirety of the Rebel fleet over there, and he succeeded. Go watch the code checking scene again and the Flight Operator does consult with an officer stating that the code is old but that it checks out; it's not on screen but how do you know they allowed them to go through since such an old code would be reported as leaked? Vader sensed Luke anyways and it was in his best interest to let him through to capture him and sway him to the dark side. The objective of the trap was to lure the rebel fleet; if they had destroyed the shuttle or captured it the shuttle passengers could have warned Rebel command about it and the whole point of the trap would be moot.
    • Oh, right. Vader did figure out Luke was onboard that shuttle, even without using this tactic. And yet the shuttle was still allowed to land, instead of just being tractored into the Executor's hangar bay. Look, if you want the Death Star blown up that bad, Anakin, just get in your TIE fighter and go do it yourself.
      • I expect the Rebels made arrangements along the lines of the fleet only departing to attack the Death Star once the away team contacted them and confirmed that they had successfully landed. Palpatine probably guessed this and wanted to let the strike team through so the Rebel fleet would attack and he could wipe out all his enemies at once.
      • There was no check-in signal in canon; we know this from the part where Lando had no idea whether the shield was successfully taken down or not until after the Rebel fleet arrived in the Endor system. Also, no check-in signal could be credibly expected; the Rebel ground team couldn't even use comlinks for fear that Imperial signals intelligence would pick up their signal, how the heck are they supposed to operate an interstellar transmitter?
      • Lando and his crew had access to a frequency for the shield, they were actively looking for it; you can assume the Empire knew this too and just switched the Shield frequency to something else while still jamming the Rebels; go watch the scene again. Lando's copilot is not entirely convinced it would be that easy, allowing Lando through questioning to infer they were being deceived. It is when the Rebel Fleet pulls out that the Empire Fleet arrives.
      • If the Executor opened fire on the shuttle or grabbed it in a tractor beam, they'd know the plan was a bust and thus would have every reason to break radio silence to warn the fleet. Not as if they'd have anything to lose at that point.
      • There's also that the Emperor's plan cannot assume that the sabotage team has a means of contacting the Rebel fleet; if you go on the assumption that they do, the entire Imperial plan is impossible. Nothing short of shooting the shuttle down by surprise could kill the entire sabotage team quickly enough that the last survivor couldn't gasp a quick warning into the radio, and doing that first option means they miss check-in anyway. Ergo, any line of speculation that has the Emperor worrying about the sabotage team having radio check-ins is one where the ROTJ movie doesn't even happen.
      • It IS possible the the commando team was able to send transmissions from the shuttle, but not from anywhere near the shield generator itself for fear of interception. In fact, consider that in order for Han's scheme to work at all someone must have had to take the shuttle Tydirium and actually deliver some supplies to the base on the moon after dropping the commandos some distance away - otherwise it would be obvious after just a few hours that the Executor had cleared a shuttle that had never arrived, and the alarm would be raised. This skeleton shuttle crew would then have been able to return and deliver the message that the plan had worked so far, but perhaps the commandos themselves didn't have the equipment to send a signal after insertion (I can't recall - is Tydirium ever shown on Endor after the insertion?). Knowing this, Palpatine would have needed to allow them to insert safely, with the plan to curb stomp them when they got to the actual generator. What doesn't make much sense is keeping that part of the plan secret from Piett, since he could have accidentally scrubbed the plan by being more suspicious about the old code.
      • That's why he has Vader stationed on the command ship, just in case Piett gets too twitchy Vader can override him and make sure the plan goes through despite any suspicions.
      • Whether or not the shuttle actually has an interstellar transmitter (the EU makes it plain that interstellar transmitters are large enough that only capital ships have them, but ok, fine, that's the EU), its not really relevant. Between the Executor itself and the Death Star, the Imperials can easily jam any transmission that one shuttle could make, a billion times over. So, wait until you know what shuttle it is, then suddenly light off all your active jammers before the Rebels can even know anything is wrong, tractor the shuttle, and board it. Don't turn the jammers off until after the shuttle has been taken apart and everybody on it was stunned. Easy peesy. The Rebel fleet is hardly going to detect that somebody used a broad-spectrum jammer in the Endor system from outside the Endor system — indeed, the Imperials were using some type of jamming field in canon, and Lando doesn't notice it until after the Rebel fleet's all in the Endor system and he's wondering why the Falcon's sensors aren't working.
      • Also, the shuttle does not necessarily have to arrive and depart safely in order to make the scheme work. It merely has to fake crash-landing on Endor, so the Imperials think they already know why it didn't arrive on schedule. Plus, given that the assigned command crew of the shuttle were Han, Chewie, Luke, and Leia, and all of them were intending to get out when the shuttle landed, who's left to fly it anywhere else?
    • They mention that it's an old code. I just assumed that some imperial pilot a while ago defected and told them everything he knew including the code.
    • The rebels are supposed to get through. Remember the Emperor is overconfidant and isn't just trying for military victory: he's a sadist. It's not enough that the rebels lose, they have to suffer. Letting them think they're winning and then pulling the rug out from under them is much more fun than simply crushing them outright.
      • Everyone is missing the simple explanation - the Emperor only claims to have leaked the location and status of the Death Star and the shield generator. He never claims to have leaked the security code or allowed the Alliance to capture a shuttle. The code and the shuttle really were stolen by covert ops of the Rebels.
      • The 'simple explanation' does cover why no special code for the Rebels, but it still doesn't address the idiocy of allowing them to land on Endor at all. Vader knew the shuttle was full of Rebels before it even finished the password sequence; he has no reason except a firm clutching of the Idiot Ball to not order that it be tractored into the Executor's hangar bay immediately. The Rebel sabotage team had no "we must make this check-in or else the fleet doesn't come" in canon, nor could it be credibly expected to have. (see points above re: fear of interception and possibility of jamming). Additionally, the Emperor's entire plan relied on the assumption that the Rebels would have only the information about Endor that the Emperor chose to deliberately leak to them and that the Rebel fleet would jump in blind; if Palpatine wasn't confident he had that information monopoly, he wouldn't have tried his trap in the first place. Further evidence lies in the behavior of the Rebel fleet once it does arrive at Endor — at no point does either Lando or Admiral Ackbar actually make any attempt to call the ground team on the radio, not even to ask them 'Do you still have any chance to lower the shield any time soon, or should we all be running away now?'. Lando's only method of knowing whether or not Han and his team are still in action is using the Falcon's sensors to check if the shield is still up or not. It is shown that the Rebel ground team had no way of contacting the Rebel fleet even at as short a range as 'within the Endor system', which casts huge huge doubt on the notion they had a way of contacting the Rebel fleet over the interstellar distance between Endor and the Fleet's original muster point.
      • Because Vader and the Emperor didn't just want to lure the Rebels into a trap, they also wanted to turn Luke over to their side. And even without that, if the Rebels hadn't been granted clearance, the shuttle would have just bugged out and returned to the Rebel fleet, and voila, the trap is ruined. Hell, this is shown on-screen when Han tells Chewie that the Empire doesn't believe them (ironically just before Vader gives them permission) which implies that the strike team already had a plan to bug out in case the Empire doesn't approve of the code given. The Emperor wanted to be absolutely sure that the Rebels would fall into the trap and keep in mind, he did have "an entire legion of my best troops," stationed near the bunker, so really the plan was sound, Palpatine just didn't expect the Ewoks to be a concern (and during the battle, until Chewbacca hijacked an AT-ST, the Ewoks really weren't a concern; they caused some damage with their booby-traps but there wasn't any prospect of breaching the bunker).
  • Why did Luke walk into Jabba's lair unarmed, instead entrusting his light saber to R2-D2 in a convoluted Gambit Roulette? It's not like they were gonna frisk him on the way in, and if they tried there was always the mind trick. Not only could he have made short work of the rancor, but in fact the poor beast would have been spared entirely as Luke would have had Jabba looking down the wrong end of a most lethal weapon immediately.
    • He didn't want to have to use lethal force, or even the threat thereof, unless it became absolutely necessary. There's a huge difference between the vague (paraphrased) "You're screwed if you don't free us" and "If you don't free us, I will stick this burny death-beam into your eye", morally speaking. He probably wasn't planning on the rancor or anything like it — and in any case, he managed just fine.
      • The Gambit is so convoluted, I have never been able to work out which part of what transpired was as Luke planned it and which part he had to improvise. The nods and what-nots on the sand barge seem to indicate that ending up above the big maul in the desert was always The Plan, but that seems rather implausible. Can anyone work out what plan Luke hatched before going in?
      • It wasn't so much a gambit as Xanatos Speed Chess. Plan A was, obviously, to just negotiate with Jabba and get Han and the others out; if that fell through, having R2 inside with his lightsaber is the clear Plan B—but R2 isn't present when Luke first confronts Jabba, so he has to improvise. There wasn't a "gambit" going on at the barge, the nods were just along the lines of, "Good, you're here, I see you, we'll figure something out."
    • Luke's plan actually wasn't that bad: Lando is the inside man, the first one in and is there to look after the rest of the operatives as they arrive and make sure no harm comes to them. 3PO and R2 go in next, because R2 is holding Luke's lightsaber since Luke could never get in there armed anyway. Leia, posing as Boushh brings in Chewie as a pretense for gaining access to the palace as well as Jabba's favor so she can hang out there for awhile, waiting for the right time to bust out Han, after which Lando will get Chewie and the droids out. Luke himself is the ace in the hole, if for any reason any part of the plan goes awry (as it obviously does onscreen) he comes in to negotiate for the prisoner's release. Should Jabba refuse then they move into "aggressive negotiations."
      • It was pretty bad. Everything that happened before Luke arrived served no purpose and only got more people captured. Even if everything had gone according to plan, Chewbacca would be locked in a cell, from which escape would be hard, Leia would have a guarded door barring her and Han's escape and the droids would be working for Jabba, from which they might have been able to escape, depending on how closely Jabba guards his droids. Lando would probably be able to get out, but not take anyone with him. Luke should have gone in alone from the start, leaving the others to call for backup if negotiations failed. Or even better, show Jabba that said backup was available, to give him some incentive to negotiate: "Hello. This is Admiral Acbar of the Mon Calamari starfleet - you know, the one with warships capable of obliterating your entire palace. Now, this is not a trap - I mean threat - but Solo and Skywalker are friends of mine and I would appreciate to have them back in one piece". At which point Luke could offer whatever he was going to give in exchange for Han's freedom.
      • And yet everyone (except Threepio) played SOME role in the battle on the sail barge. It's implied that Luke knew (possibly even via the Force) that his plan was going to go down like this, so he got all his pieces into place, but still left plenty of options for ending the threat peacefully.
  • Leia basically tells Han she's going to take him and go... it implies her getting caught wasn't part of the plan. So basically the plan was "screw Chewie & the droids... let's go get Han!"
    • This was indeed a Xanatos Gambit on Luke & Co.'s part, and it works out like this.
      • Plan A- The droids convey Luke's offer to Jabba. If he accepts and frees Solo, then Lando, the Inside Man, steals the droids and they all escape (probably with assistance from the rest on the outside, as in all the other plans below).
      • Plan B- Leia and Chewie infiltrate the palace. Leia frees Han. Lando waits until the uproar over Solo's escape, then makes his move and frees Chewie, who helps him steal both droids.
      • Plan C- Luke walks right in and uses his Jedi Mind Trick on Jabba, who returns Han, Leia, and Chewie to him. They escape. Lando carries out Plan A as outlined above.
      • The fact that Jabba is resistant to the Mind Trick brings up a Plan D- pull a gun on Jabba, and use the uproar as a means to improvise an escape on the fly. At this point it becomes Xanatos Speed Chess. Nobody counted on the trap door right under the platform. However, Luke and Artoo are Crazy-Prepared and Luke can count on his trusty sidekick to get into position to launch him his lightsaber at the right moment.

  • So the reason that the rebel fleet's desperate frontal assault on the Executor worked because no one had ever thought to actually fight a Star Destroyer head-on? I mean, sure, the rebels don't exactly have the resources to toss around to go on balls-to-the-wall assaults, but what, did everyone else just give up when they saw a Star Destroyer? "Welp, Star Destroyer's here. Everyone pack up, we're surrendering."
    • Possibly so, since hardly anybody has the firepower to go toe-to-toe with one, and those that do (basically just the main Rebel fleet) are more bent on fleet preservation. When you're badly outnumbered in a war, you can't afford to fight an even battle of attrition, so the Rebellion was all about Fabian strategies or raiding efforts. When they were finally forced to go head-on, the rebel ships turned out to be much more effective than expected - remember that Star Destroyers, powerful as they were, possibly hadn't ever had to face a significant threat from other capitol ships in the past 2+ decades of the Empire. There's even some Real Life parallels in the way that from the building of HMS Dreadnought up through the end of World War II, there was actually very little fighting between opposing battleships, and on many occasions they performed poorly against lesser ships when put to the test (Denmark Strait, Cape Matapan, 1st Guadalcanal, Surigao Strait, and especially Samar).
    • It's not that they hadn't tried before; go look at the scene in question. Once they discover the Death Star is operational Lando proposes Akbar to go engage the Executor at point blank range. Akbar retorts that "they won't last long against a Super Star Destroyer at that range" not that they CANT win the engagement. Akbar also doesn't state that their ships are weak, as the spectator can infer from the visuals that they CAN take on normal Star Destroyers at point blank.
      • He said "At that close range, we won't last long against those Star Destroyers", meaning the entire Imperial Fleet that was there. They weren't confident about their chances at all.
    • Akbar first calls for a retreat since they can't repel the Death Star laser with their shields; Lando then proposes to engage at point blank presumably to keep the DS from firing on their own ships and buy some time "We might take some of them with us".
      • And they DID last longer with this strategy and were even able to disable the Executor's shield generator; they downed it on a lucky shot since they had a ship accidentally crash INSIDE the command deck.
    • The Executor isn't a Star Destroyer. It's a Super Star Destroyer; it's more than 10 times the size of the regular Star Destroyers, and it's the Emperor's flagship. So, yes, when they saw it on the battlefield, it was shorthand for "you are so fucked right now."
    • Especially when the Death Star revealed that it was quite operational and capable of firing the death ray. That's why Ackbar was all "RETREAT! RETREAT! RETREAT!" He knew how fucked they all were and rightfully assumed that this attack would spell their complete and utter doom.
    • Entertainingly enough, that's exactly how it worked in the X-Wing game. You had until the Star Destroyer arrived to finish your mission. Once they showed up and began to spew forth wave after wave of TIE Fighters, it was time to finish up and get the hell out of there.
    • Besides all that, Ackbar probably meant on a one-to-one basis. If they had superior numbers, the Rebels might be bolder, but it's not made clear whether or not the rebels even had equal numbers with the Imperials.
      • Indeed. The Rebel fleet is clearly based on speed and agility while the Imperials use brute force and raw power. While not always the best source in most computer games only the Mon Calimari cruisers can go toe to toe with a Star Destroyer and stand much of a chance.
      • And that's only because of their fighter compliment.
    • It may have worked because it was a completely suicidal attack - the Rebels probably incurred more losses in the process of taking out the Executor than any admiral would consider an acceptable trade in a normal battle. The Battle of Endor was simply too desperate for retreat or surrender, and it probably also involved a larger enemy force than any Super Star Destroyer had ever faced.
      • Although I'd say taking out the Executor meant that the battle was an acceptable trade. That thing is worth a half-dozen of any other ship type out there fighting.
    • The attack on the Star Destroyers wasn't meant to be a brilliant strategy, it was simply the lesser of two evils at that point, as the Death Star wouldn't be able to fire on their ships anymore without hitting the Star Destroyers in the process.
    • It's not that the Rebel ships were incapable of taking on a Star Destroyer. Some of their ships were roughly as powerful as standard Star Destroyer. At least one (Ackbar's flagship) was nearly double the size of a standard Star Destroyer. But they didn't have very many of those. The majority of their ships were smaller, less powerful ones. And the Imperials had a full Sector Fleet reinforced by Vader's Death Squadron. They outnumbered the Rebels significantly. Attacking head-on against a superior force is generally considered a bad idea. The Rebels no doubt (the EU backs this up) had fought Star Destroyers before, but that typically would've been hit-and-run ambushes against individual ships on patrol rather than large-scale fleet battles.

  • Why were there any speeders on Endor? Endor is the last place you want fast moving, lightly armored vehicles. It's so heavily covered in forest that it's known as the forest moon. We even see why it's a stupid idea in the movie, several Scout troopers die because they crashed into trees. Speeders make sense on moons and planets with large open areas to drive (or hover) on, large tough vehicles that can smash through obstacles make sense on Endor.
    • Speeders prove they can fly above the tree line when Leia does just that to take down the scout trooper on her own. The question is why don't they do that as a matter of course.
      • But Endor is a moon known specifically for its dense forests. What would the use be of going above the tree line if you can't see anything going on below it?
      • Why is something that's bigger, louder, and going to require tons more maintenance (knocking over trees isn't exactly easy on the equipment) preferable? Believe it or not, "completely wreck everything about the planet we're on," isn't necessarily the best idea. Those crashes happen because they're in a fight and someone pushed them into crashing.
      • Leia never goes above the tree line, at least not in the movie (does the novelization say otherwise)? She only flew up and out of the scout's line of sight. Flying up into the foliage of a densely-packed forest, amid the overlapping branches and leaves, would be more suicidal than flying between the tree trunks.
      • Small hover bikes would probably be a decent mode of transportation through a forest under normal circumstances. They don't need to go at full speed all the time.
      • The "they're trying not to unnecessarily wreck up the place" is actually supported by the EU. Palpatine is apparently something of an amateur naturalist... he likes collecting rare, endangered, and often extremely deadly creatures. Darksaber had him make a point of saving a particularly voracious species of beetle from Yavin because he thought they were going to blow it up. Anyway, as the others said, they probably went a fair bit slower on the speeders in normal circumstances, but "I'm outnumbered a dozen to one and these guys look pissed" is not normal circumstances so the one Stormtrooper took off like a bat out of Hell.
      • Funnily enough, in the EU (specifically the novel Choices of One, by Timothy Zahn) Thrawn is the one who recommends that Palpatine actually bulldoze the forest around the generator and make it unassaisalable, until he realizes the Emperor is setting a trap. So the exposed generator was also part of the trap, as was everything else. Of course he dismissed Thrawn's warning about not underestimating the Ewoks, which came back to bite him in the ass.
  • Early on in the movie we see Jabba and co. asleep in roughly the same area. Why didn't Leia just throw her detonator at them then? It would have had the same ultimate effect and wouldn't have been as unintelligent as trying to sneak Solo out.
    • She'd be caught in the blast radius?
  • Why did the Rebel Fleet bring the medical frigate with them to the Battle of Endor? As meat shield? As cannon fodder? It's a (relatively) tiny ship with few weapons and no fighter complement, so its offensive value is virtually nil against an Imperial vessel. Its ability to function as a hospital ship would also be hindered by the running battle: any casualties or injuries incurred in the midst of combat (on the Endor surface or aboard Rebel starships) that required immediate medical attention would have to be treated on site, as ferrying them to and from the frigate would put even more personnel at risk. And injured Rebels that didn't require immediate care could wait until the end of the battle, when the moon's orbit was secure, and then have the Fleet summon as many hospital ships as it wanted. But the ship's presence there only forced the Rebel fighters to waste time protecting it, and in the end, the related materials say that it was eventually sunk by the Death Star anyway. So was there a point of having it there beyond giving the Imperials something else to shoot at? Because even that's debatable: surely the Empire would realize the frigate's minimal tactical value and would focus instead on juicier targets like Home-One.
    • The original plan for the battle hadn't called for prolonged fighting. The Rebel ships would swoop in, and the fighters would attack the Death Star while the capital ships, with some fighters who stayed back, ran interference to keep the ships inside from being attacked. The medical frigate would be an asset in that case since a pilot who has ejected from his fighter would be able to be recovered by a shuttle from the medical frigate quickly, since this was going to be the equivalent of a 'smash-and-grab' run. However, since the shield was still up, that's when the frigate became a liability, as the lack of defenses meant that it wouldn't be capable of surviving the pitched battle that they got stuck in.
    • I don't know if the medical frigate lost anything by being a hospital ship, but in the game Tie Fighter those frigates are far from defenseless. Besides carrying at least a squadron of fighters, frigates of the type shown in the film have some scary point defenses. The ships aren't good against Star Destroyers, but I wouldn't volunteer to strafe one in a TIE fighter, that's for sure. The frigate, in the original plan, was probably supposed to provide some anti-fighter support, not trade turbolaser volleys with a Star Destroyer.
      • What if it's a converted medical frigate just like many of the star cruisers are converted luxury liners? FWIW, if you look carefully and use freeze-frame, the Rebels have at least two of these frigates in the battle.
      • It IS a conversion. The ship is a Nebulon-B escort frigate, a number of which defected to the Alliance.
  • All right. You're a feared, experienced bounty hunter, with a variety of long-range weapons including a huge Hand Cannon carbine that you're very good at using. You're in a very advantageous position (the shaded deck of Jabba's barge) and your target is on lower ground (the deck of a sand skiff,) out in the open, distracted by scores of other guardsmen, and doesn't even know you're there. His weapon, while powerful, is limited to a range of maybe two meters. And while he may claim to be a Jedi, he's only using basic melee attacks to defend himself and his friends, so staying away from him is still the better option. You have every possible advantage you could ever want to blast him to smithereens. Why would you ever fly from your position to land almost on top of your enemy, immediately alerting him to your presence and intentions, and then draw your carbine at point-blank range to his face where he can chop it in half before you can blink?
    • Factoring in the Prequel movies, Boba saw his 'father' take down at least one Jedi via Five Rounds Rapid and the element of surprise during the Battle of Geonosis. Probably figured dropping right in front of one who was already distracted by the Mooks would give him a decent chance. As for the point-blank range: if Boba had missed, then Luke would know where he was attacking from. Point blank means less chances of missing and less time for Luke to react.
      • That answer is contradictory. If he misses a distant shot, and alerts Luke to his presence, the latter still can't react against him (e.g. use the Force, or take his time to leap and climb onto the barge to engage in melee) because of all the Mooks distracting him. OTOH, Luke saw Fett coming in even before the hunter touched down on the skiff, so taking care of him when he pulled his gun took only a split second.
    • Plus Boba is a bounty hunter, not an assassin. The bounty for Luke is SPECIFICALLY stated that he has to be alive. Boba figured he could snatch a nice imperial bounty on him. He's not there to kill Luke, he tried to capture and subdue him after all.
      • What bounty? The movie makes no mention of it. And if the novelization does, then wouldn't it still be safer, and smarter, for Fett to set his carbine on stunnote  and snipe at Luke from the vantage point of the barge, instead of shooting at Luke's face from two inches away?
      • If Luke was needed alive, then blasting him from afar would be useless anyway; the Mooks would kill him stun or not. Boba has to show up in person to show that he wants to bring Luke in himself, holding back the Mooks. So if you have to do that, using the surprise close range tactic you saw your father pull off successfully is actually the best bet.
      • You can't "snipe" with the stun setting on blasters in the Star Wars universe. Stun beams are extremely inaccurate, the one time in the movies they're shown being used is in a confined space at near point-blank range. That's why hardly anyone uses them, in either the movies or the EU, you're more likely to get the same results by just running up to someone and slugging them in the head. Also there's a line in, I believe Empire Strikes Back, that all of the prominent rebel leaders have bounties on their heads. The fact that Luke's would specify alive is pretty much basic logic... Vader says repeatedly "I want him alive" when talking about Luke, so saying that any bounty on him wouldn't specify 'Alive Only, No Money Dead' or somesuch wouldn't make sense.
  • When the Emperor was trying to taunt Luke into attacking him, he appeared to have no means of defending himself against a lightsaber swing. If Luke had gone ahead and attacked, wouldn't that have ended with the Emperor lying dead after being cut in half? (Yeah, the EU talks about clone bodies and such, but that's not mentioned in the film, ever.) And don't get me started on the taunting. Every time Luke comes close to attacking, the Emperor opens his mouth and Luke thinks better of it. (Unless the whole "if you'll attack me you'll magically turn Evil" thing was Reverse Psychology, but that doesn't make sense either.)
    • I think the whole point of that was to pit Luke against Darth Vader, to see if Luke would make a worthy successor. Remember, the Emperor's taunting succeeds and Luke does try to hack down the Emperor, only for Darth Vader to intercede.
    • I believe this was posted elsewhere, but I shall post it here in hopes that it helps: the Emperor was taunting Luke in order to ensure that Luke fell to the Dark Side. Luke would be able to find ways to justify murdering the Emperor (needs of the many, kill the head and the body dies, etc.) but those are righteous thoughts compared to stabbing an old man in anger and cold blood, and this would be Luke's first step to the Dark Side. Once Vader stepped in, Palpatine kept up the onslaught of taunts to ensure that Luke would not only fall, but would enter the Emperor's service just like his father did. Seeing how well the strategy of pushing a man when he is hovering just above his own personal Moral Event Horizon worked with Anakin, it's a valid theory that the same thing might work on his son.
    • Why did Vader protect The Emperor anyway?
      • Either to keep Luke from turning to the Dark Side or because he knows that if he doesn't protect the Emperor and the Emperor survives, he'll have the Emperor and Luke to worry about.
      • It's been driven into him. A properly-trained Sith apprentice both loves and hates his Master in equal measure, and will protect him from all threats until the day when he rises up to kill him. Palpatine pulled that off almost perfectly... he both took everything Anakin had and gave Vader everything he has. Even when Vader is trying to turn Luke, he says "Join me, and together we will depose the Emperor and rule the galaxy", not "Off the Emperor on your own, we'll work it out afterwards".
  • So what would have happened if, against all odds, Jabba felt generous on the day Threepio and Artoo showed up and actually accepted Luke's plea for Han? He could've accepted the droids that Luke sent him in good faith, tossed a blind and crippled man out into the desert to fend for himself, and gone on with his business. But then Luke is out of two loyal, priceless droids and his brand new lightsaber. Of course Luke knew Jabba would never accept it (and thus planted Chewie and R2 inside the court so they'd help him break Han out,) but what if he had?
    • He could always make another lightsaber. As for the droids, well, they're just droids. As far as Han is concerned, Luke didn't know Han would be blind or even that he'd still be frozen when he formed the plan. If he'd just booted Han out of the palace, he presumably would be expected to be fine on his own till Luke could catch up with him.
    • Don't forget that Lando was there before R2 and Threepio showed up. Odds are, he was inserted in case of that eventuality. If Jabba had felt generous, then Lando would have probably snuck away and helped Han get away, at which point Luke would have probably have snuck in at night and spirited the droids away.
      • The droids probably could have left on their own, without needing Luke to come get them. Artoo would have gotten Threepio and convinced him to leave, hacked any systems he needed to get out a door, and in the eventuality of a purely mechanical door could have said "Hey, goldenrod, take this and slice us a hole, okay?" Which would have been pretty hilarious to see, Threepio actually wielding a lightsaber, however awkwardly.
  • Why does Ackbar get all the credit for starting the "It's a trap!" meme, when Leia said it first in The Empire Strikes Back?
    • It's the delivery, not the three banal words, that people respond to.
      • It's actually not even that. The meme itself started when someone posted an animated gif of... well, let's just say that the first frame, and thus the preview image, looked like an attractive woman. Someone who had opened the gif and seen what happened when it panned down posted a picture of Ackbar and the text "IT'S A TRAP!" This was considered pretty hilarious. Thus, since the original incident involved Ackbar, Ackbar is credited for the meme.
  • The Rebel Fleet can't attack the second Death Star because it is protected by a shield. Even fighters can't get through. Why wasn't this an issue in A New Hope?
    • That Death Star was mobile, while the second Death Star in orbit around Endor and had its shield being projected from there. The first Death Star had no shield during the final battle because it was deep in enemy space with no other Empire stronghold around. Had it been attacked near an Imperial world, it likely would have had one and the Rebels would have had an even tougher battle.
    • The shield on the Death Star II was being projected by a station on Endor. Or, the shield on the DSII exists specifically because the failures on the DSI. Alternatively, the Death Star novel gives an interesting explanation: they comment about how it's easy (relatively speaking) to build a weapon that can destroy a planet, and it's easy to build a shield to protect it. What's hard is doing both at the same time. As a result, the Empire decided to rely more on the immense amounts of firepower the DSI was capable of to kill anything that got near and shield only a relative fraction of it.
    • The empire didn't view anything as small as a fighter as a threat to the first Death Star—they expected, if anything, huge capital ships to attack, so that's what they designed it to defend against. It was an elephant and expected to be attacked by lions or hyenas, not mosquitoes. The shield in Return of the Jedi was a deliberate response to what happened in the first one—they were forcibly made aware of the weakness and made an effort to compensate for it.
  • Not such a big deal, but doesn't anybody find it odd how big the moon of Endor is? In A New Hope, Luke and Han mistake the original Death Star for a small moon, and it is stated that the second Death Star is just as big as the first. When the briefing occurs and a hologram is shown, the Death Star is DWARFED by the moon. How big is this moon? I know it's potentially possible for a natural satellite to be that big, but still. And how big must that planet be?
    • Wookiepedia says that the planet Endor is a gas giant 148,000 km in diameter and the Forest Moon of Endor is 4,900 km in diameter, while the first Death Star was 160 km. (For comparison, Jupiter is 139,822 km and its largest moon, Ganymede, is 5,262 km. Earth is 12,742 km, Earth's moon is 3,474 km, and the two moons of Mars are both less than 30 km.)
  • Why did the ewoks refuse to obey their "god" when he told them to free his friends, it wasn't until he started flying around above them that they did what he ordered, why would they disobey the one they worship and then not take his warning seriously?
    • There are different kinds of gods. Threepio's translation is partly guesswork, remember, he doesn't know the exact language they're using, he's just putting it together from everything he knows about languages. The actual word they use might be more comparable to, say, "house spirit", or "oracle", or something like that. They might be intending to honor him, ask him for advice, have him bless babies and whatnot but not actually let him run the joint. When he apparently starts displaying actual powers they're all "Oh holy crap he's that kind of god, do what he says before he smites us!"
    • Also, the Ewoks may have believed Threepio was testing them to see how loyal they were. They may have believed this god prefers sacrifice over mercy, especially the sacrifice of one who tried to attack the god (Solo). We really know nothing of Ewok culture and beliefs at this point in the series.
  • Palpatines corruption of Anakin was slow and well put together, he spent years gaining his trust, praising his powers and gradualy turning him against the Jedi while using his fear for his family to finally get him on his side. Why then did he think he could do the same to Luke in just five minutes, Luke already knows hes an evil Sith lord and has reason enough to never want to join him and all Palpatines methods seem to amount to to is him going "watch your friends die hahahahaha soon you will be begging to be on my team" how is pissing someone off going to make them like you? and after beating Vader wouldn't it be more likely that he would then attack the emperor rather than go "hey you know what, i really want to join you now"
    • For one, Palpatine had access to Anakin since he was a small child and thus had plenty of time and opportunity for the slow path of corruption. He didn't with Luke. Thus his attempts are a bit more blunt through necessity. But that also implies that Palpatine hasn't been doing what he can to tempt and corrupt Luke, partly simply by giving him ample cause to go into battle, which is one of those things that always puts Jedi at risk.
  • Minor one, but when Luke cuts off Vader's hand it's later shown to be robotic. Yet Vader still yells like a real hand was cut off, why?
    • The robotic hands still feel pain.
    • "He's more machine now than man."
  • If the Rebellion lost the Battle of Endor, how would it automatically mark the death of the Rebellion? Couldn't the Rebellion just reorganize itself, and try to attack the Empire again, maybe after the second Death Star was completed by looking for small thermal exhaust port on it that they could torpedo away, after the second Death Star is away from its shield on Endor?
    • First off, the second Death Star wasn't designed with that design flaw, and even then the original was defeated by a guy with superhuman capabilities. I think the only way the second Death Star could be beaten would be by infiltration and sabotage. However, by then the Empire would have the ability to reproduce the Death Stars with relative impunity (relative because a Death Star is a goddamn huge money sink even with a million systems backing it). Secondly, while new rebellions might pop up, the "Alliance to Restore the Republic" would have been crushed, and as the most successful rebellion against the Empire, it would probably damage morale something fierce especially with a potential fleet of Death Stars backing the Empire up. I'm thinking the Empire would be relatively secure for the next few decades, at least until Palpatine dies from old age/Dark Side Corruption/getting murdered by his successor.
    • It would be the death of the rebellion because they would be annihilated. They threw everything they had at the Death Star - even the transports they used to evacuate Hoth, for whatever reason - and with the star destroyers blocking their escape, it was either win or die.
  • Minor one, but does Han Solo ever find out Darth Vader is Luke and Leia's father? It seems to be a critical need to know thing to know about his future wife and brother in law.
    • Luke and Leia probably just said that their dad was a Jedi named Anakin Skywalker who died a long time ago. I'm not sure Han would take it all that well if he found out that he was about to be the son in law of the second most evil man in the galaxy. Would you want to tell him? Some things are just better left unsaid, y'know?
    • I presume they had that discussion when Luke dragged Vader's body out of his shuttle to give it a Viking funeral. Han is a pretty straightforward, live-in-the-moment, kind of guy, he may not have liked it but he isn't the sort to dwell on things. Once he washed Vader's corpse-smoke stink out of his clothes he probably never even gave Vader another thought in his life.
    • He's well aware in the EU, for what it's worth. The one with the biggest hang up about it is Leia. It takes her much longer to come to grips with it than anyone else. She rebuffs an attempt by Anakin to apologize via the Force, she's initially adamant about not having children with Han, and she obviously has issues being able to separate Anakin and Vader as Luke does. To be fair, shes the one that dealt with Vader for most of her life, he's tortured her directly, and she partially blames him for Alderaan. Han, on the other hand, while subjected to some horrible stuff by Vader, is a much more cavalier person in general.
      • Essentially, they fall on opposite sides of the nature/nurture debate. Leia feels it's nature, Han is backing nurture. The novel Tatooine Ghost deals directly with this, as Leia learns of Anakin's exploits and of her grandmother's existence, with the backdrop of Han pushing for kids while Leia is balking.
    • And it's probably easier for Han, since he's only related to Vader through marriage, not blood. He doesn't have the 'daddy is the second most evil man in the galaxy' weighing down on him as Leia and Luke does.

  • Based on what Yoda and Obi-Wan witness from both Palpatine's and Dooku's attacks, you would think that they'd give Luke a good primer on Palpatine's personal Beam Spam weapon, Force lightning. Perhaps neither thought Luke would be stupid enough to face the Emperor (they only wanted Vader killed). Instead, Luke plays Idiot Ball (for drama's sake, as it was that great moment of stupidity that leads to Vader's redemptive sacrifice).
    • What we have seen of Force Lightning indicates that if you are a Jedi Master (Yoda, Mace Windu, or Obi-Wan Kenobi), you can deflect or catch it 'somehow' using your lightsaber. EDIT: Upon rewatching the prequels, Yoda can even catch it barehanded and throw it back at the caster! Young Anakin Skywalker, however, was blown right off his feet by Dooku's lightning on Geonosis. I would guess that Luke, as of Jedi, is much closer to young Anakin's level (Padawan ready to graduate to full Jedi Knight) than he is to being a Master. Luke is perhaps a little farther along the path, given Yoda's pronouncement that "No more training do you require", but he still is no Mace Windu. I presume the Idiot Ball referred to is Luke's tossing away of his lightsaber; but I would venture that the lightsaber wouldn't have helped him in any case, and his Drop Your Lightsaber gesture is what dramatically illustrated his refusal to kill his father and turn to the Dark Side.
      • In the novelization Luke does use the force after the initial blast of electricity trying to repel the lightning. He manages to hold it off for only a few seconds before being hit by it again, because the Emperor is just so much more powerful than him. As for the original question, it still stands. Yoda even says "Of the Emperor beware - do not underestimate his powers" but doesn't mention anything useful about what these powers are.

  • A few things about the mission to rescue Han from Jabba. Firstly, what was the point of keeping Lando in disguise? He didn't do anything useful and he even led Leia to Jabba after she was captured! And then in the Sail Barge battle, he wrestles with ONE goon a little before they're both knocked off the skiff. Also, speaking of Leia, why didn't Luke or Lando or R2 or anyone try and help her out? She was basically a sex slave to a slug and, yet, none of them so much as mention the fact she's enslaved, nor do they make any attempt to rescue her. And, yes, it was awesome to see her kill Jabba all by herself but seriously, some help would have been nice.
    • Lando was insurance—he's there so that Leia has someone on her side to help if Jabba says "Execute her" instead of "put her in a bikini." Leia is perfectly capable on her own and, you know, escapes on her own and kills Jabba with her own hands. They didn't go out of their way to help and rescue her because they knew she didn't need it.
      • You have a strange idea about any human's abilities if you think Leia would have survived for more than five seconds if Jabba simply decided to kill her. When she's first caught, she's surrounded by a lot of strong, armed, and quite possibly experienced killers. Short of blowing herself up, she's got no options, even if Lando is still there to help. Also, just because she could escape on her own does not mean her friends should expect her to. She'd help them, so they should help her. Luke does precisely that.
    • I can buy that Lando was insurance but I doubt that they didn't rescue her because they thought she didn't need the help. Leia getting caught was probably not part of the plan, and her being chained to Jabba certainly wasn't. Leia is perfectly capable of handling herself but when you're chained to a giant slug with armed guards near him and with no weapons on you, anyone in that position would be vulnerable. So, again, why would they not, at least, try and rescue her?
      • Part of the plan? Maybe not Plan A, but certainly a known possibility. As for them trying to rescue her...Perhaps you mean something like, say, Luke jumping over to the Barge, engaging the guards, on it, and helping her swing away afterward?

        Leia is not some damsel in distress that needs a big strong man hero to rescue her. That is the point of her character. And everyone else involved knows exactly how deadly and capable she is. They didn't go out of their way to make rescuing her a top priority because they knew she could take care of herself.
      • I know she's not a damsel in distress, as you can see by the fact that I explicitly said that she was perfectly capable of handling herself. ^^Now that you point it out, I guess Luke's plan was to jump over to the barge, rescue Leia, and then blow up the barge. Too bad Leia beat him to it! Alright, that's all cleared up.
      • I always got the impression that by the time Luke got in there they were on plan D or F or something. Not part of the original plan at all, but adapting to Jaba and his goons changing the plans they laid out. As for why Lando was in disguise, what would you expect him to do? Loose the disguise and then his life? He may have seemed useless, but I always assumed he was to remain hidden until all else failed. Fortunately, things worked out with plan Z (finally).
    • Most likely, Lando was feeding information about how things were going in Jabba's palace back to Luke, to alert him if something went wrong.
    • Trying to rescue Leia at the point where she's first captured would have been counterproductive. The plan to steal Solo in the middle of the night was blown, so Lando is leading her to Jabba and shaking his head at her, signalling "not yet, wait for Luke, the last piece, to come into play, before we make our next move." After all, Chewbacca is in a cell at that time and is no help, R2 is on the sail barge already (probably) and the team is split up. It's really only after they are all gathered together for Luke and Han's execution that they are all in a position to work together. Lando being in disguise should have let him surprise Jabba's men and be very effective. The fact that he performed horribly was not his fault, his luck let him down. He compensated later by blowing up the Death Star.
    • Think of Lando as a kind of wild card (he'd probably call it a skifter or something). Whatever happens, the crew has at least one armed ally in Jabba's palace that Jabba doesn't know about, ready to intervene as needed no matter what the need is.

  • How come Boba Fett didn't recognize Lando?
    • Lando had a mask on.
    • Why would he care, even if he did? Boba wouldn't have made any connection between Lando and the Rebels, as he left long before that connection was made (publicly). Sure, he might have recognized him as one of the guys shooting at Slave 1 as it left Bespin (can't recall if Lando was even in that scene, and if he wasn't, that makes the point), and been a little miffed, but that was business. Fett is a businessman, first and foremost. But again, why would he care? Jabba has already paid him (not even Jabba would withhold payment from that one...), so it is no longer his problem. He could potentially double-dip Jabba, as once Han has escaped, a capable (and now proven) bounty hunter will have to be hired to track him down again...

  • In Return of the Jedi, when Han Solo is leading the team of crack commandos who are heavily camouflaged and very stealthy, why do they bring along a shiny brass robot? No good reason, that's why.
    • They were divinely influenced by C-3PO to bring him to his worshipers, the Ewoks. Or maybe he was previously programmed as an assassin droid and the memories resurfaced? Though more likely is the writers wanted the C-3PO-as-Ewok-god plot point and either forgot or didn't care to work backwards from there to justify him tagging along.
    • Someone needs to translate for R2. The rest of the team doesn't seem terribly happy to be bringing him along anyway.
    • Perhaps they brought him along to translate for the Ewoks and convert them to their side, the Rebels being Genre Savvy and knowing that Underdogs Never Lose. A better question would be: why do they need a full-sized android to be their translator in the first place? Yes, he would be useful for diplomatic functions where they need a life-size representative (like Jabba's palace) but surely there's a handheld translator out there somewhere. Luke's X-Wing has a translator for R2.
      • Yes, Luke's X-wing has a translator, but they probably all do. The droid's like a co-pilot, and they speak a specific artificial language, which would be easy to translate back to Basic. Completely foreign languages ensconced in an otherwise-isolated culture...not so much.
    • Possibly they were planning to use 3PO as a distraction for the storm troopers, in which case his shininess would actually be an advantage. They didn't say this out loud because they knew he'd freak out if he knew their intentions, and they never did so because that Ewok who stole the hoverbike stepped up and did it first.
      • Ahh, but he does get used for a distraction. He baits the Stormtroopers into an Ewok ambush after the Rebels are captured.
    • Perhaps he was originally going to stay in the ca-, er, ship, but when they got there something came up that necessitated taking him with them. Or, more likely, they were planning to leave him somewhere before going into actual combat and then come back for him afterwards.

  • So, shuttle Tydirium is "bringing parts and equipment" to the Endor moon. The Emperor and Vader know what's up, and let it pass. Piett suspects there's something off, but heeds Vader's command. But the rest of the Imperial crew has no idea why that shuttle, instead of landing in the nice, elevated, designated landing platform, suddenly veered off course and landed in the middle of a forest, and was never heard from again. Sure, anyone who brought this up would be told not to worry about it, but wouldn't the Rebels themselves realize the myriad issues with this plan?
    • Guerilla fighters, rebels, and general resistance forces rarely have the option of a good plan, or the luxury of time to plot one. What they get are opportunities and plans with a shot of working. As far as the Endor plan goes, it is far from the worst long shot in existence. Especially when it looks like the alternative was "Death Star II". This was probably the best they could get, what with Palpatine carefully orchestrating the scenario to constrain them.
    • Also, with some clever piloting and maybe a fake distress signal its not impossible to fool the Imperial air traffic controllers into thinking you crashed in the middle of the forest, as opposed to landing there. Granted, you run the risk that the Imperials might send out a search-and-rescue flight that will then find your perfectly intact and empty shuttle sitting on the ground, but betting on the Empire to be callous and wasteful of human life is usually a safe bet. Spaceships crashing from orbit don't usually leave survivors anyway.
    • Callous and wasteful of human life.. sure. Callous and wasteful of an expensive spaceship, probably not. Besides it's a top secret project, any random crash is going to be investigated in case it wasn't an accident. Also as mentioned in the Star Wars headscratcher archives, the military does not watch everything that closely. The Executor let them pass, and would expect to get a call from the base if the shuttle never arrived but since the shuttle isn't expected by the shield generator in the first place, there would be no reason to call it in.

  • When Jabba captures Leia he clearly seems to be acting with lustful intent, and C-3PO says "I can't bear to watch". Yet it doesn't seem that Leia is so completely traumatised by the event that anything incredibly horrible (on the level of rape) had happened to her. So just what was it that Threepio couldn't bear to see? Or is it just that, being his typical protocol-droid self, he's just that sensitive? (And anyway, why is Jabba fond of humanoid females in quite that way? Would he not be more attracted to his own kind, finding humanoids as repulsive as we do him?)
    • According to the EU, Jabba does have something of a fetish for humanoid females (which even other Hutts find weird), and even if you don't take that into account, there are some people who are into animals or creatures who are not remotely human. Jabba could be similar to that. As to Threepio's reaction, yes it's just him being his usual self.

  • When its implied the Ewoks are about to eat the main members of the cast, why do they string up R2-D2? Do they just assume he's a weird creature with a hard shell and meaty insides?
    • Considering their level of technological sophistication, most likely.

  • If Darth Vader was a Jedi why didn't his body dissapear when he died as Obi Wan and Yoda did?
    • Because that doesn't happen every time a Jedi dies. Watch the other movies.
    • Who says his body didn't disappear? Unlike Yoda and Obi-Wan, he's not wearing robes. He's wearing hard-shell armor. And huge chunks of his body (including all four limbs) have already been replaced by cybernetic parts. Since Vader/Anakin was already lying down when he died, his armor wouldn't have any reason to collapse after his body disappeared out of it. And then Luke takes the armor to burn for Anakin's funeral.
      • But his head was exposed, it counts as his body and it didn't dissapear.
    • Probably because it didn't disappear until Luke put him on that pyre. By that point, his mask was put back on, so we didn't get to see if he became a Force Ghost until the party.

  • When Wedge and Lando take out the Death Star's reactor, why does it tilt over and start to fall? The reactor is at the exact center of the Death Star, and there's no rational reason to have artificial gravity in a section that would rarely if ever have people in it. And for that matter, if people did have to enter that massive chamber to do maintenance on the reactor, artificial gravity would actively hinder them and make it much more dangerous. Thus, the reactor should even if completely severed from the bottom of the chamber by the missiles exploding, have just floated there.
    • There actually IS gravity; it was pulled towards Endor.

  • "Split up and head back to the surface. And see if you can get a few of those TIE fighters to follow you." Who the hell would break off their pursuit of an enemy rapidly approaching the vulnerable core of their battle station, to go chase after a few fighters who seem to be in retreat? It seems that in reality, all Lando would do is needlessly reduce his own numbers and draw more fire onto himself and Wedge; the fact that some of the TIEs do break off strikes me as nothing more than a case of Too Dumb to Live.
    • The TIE pilots might not know the ins and outs of the inside of the space station — if they don't know which way the core is, they're going to pursue all the enemy pilots who might.

  • Did Lando ever apologize to Han about his betrayal at Cloud City.

  • Did Darth Vader get off too easy? I mean, sure he turned back to the light side at the last minute but before that he had no problem murdering anyone who was so much as standing in his way in the hallway. He spent over twenty years being the public face of Imperial tyranny and now he gets to spend eternity in Force heaven because in his last moments he saved the life of someone he personally cared about.
    • According to the old EU, Luke felt Vader got what he deserved in terms of both forgiveness and punishment, so was in balance with the Force. Leia felt Vader could never ever be forgiven. For everyone else, who knows? Its one of those things that every individual has to form their own opinion over, there is no right or wrong answer.
    • As far as Anakin is concerned, being Darth Vader for 20 years until his Redemption Equals Death was the punishment for his crimes. He only joined the Sith so he can gain the power to cheat death and save his wife from childbirth. However, this decision caused him to destroy the Jedi Order, betray all of his friends, lose all of his limbs and burn in Mustafar's lava fields after losing a duel to his former best friend and master, being forcibly converted as a cyborg in a permeant iron clad life support suit, and then realize it was all for nothing since Sidious revealed his wife died anyways, meaning that he has nothing left except embracing the identity of Vader and hating himself for mess. The fact that Luke even suggests he could turn back from the Dark Side is shocking for Vader, for even he thought he was beyond any form of redemption after all this. Saving Luke from the Emperor was really his second chance of making the right choice and atone for his initial sin (the fear of death) that led him down the Dark Path.

  • Why did the Executor start to plummet after the bridge went out? Wasn't there a backup bridge?
    • The most common theory (and a common explanation in the EU) is that the Death Star was putting out a strong artificial gravitational field in order to keep the Rebel Fleet from escaping into hyperspace. When the Executor's bridge was taken out, the ship (which was fairly close to the Death Star) got caught in its massive gravity well and pulled in before any backup controls could take hold.
      • The death star wouldn't even need an artificial gravitational field, it's the size of a small moon, it would have gravity all on it's own.
      • The Death Star II is about the size of Ceres, and should thus have a weak field of about 0.03g, assuming equivalent mass. ...amusingly, by definition, the Death Star II is less the size of a "small moon" and more a dwarf planet! Bring that up to Han Solo! "It's heading for that small moon!" "That's No Moon!. It's a dwarf planet." "Actually, it's a space station."
      • It depends on the source. The movie novelization only pegs the DS2 at slightly less than twice the size of the original Death Star, which was 120-160 km.
      • The gravitational field being emitted wouldn't be to allow for gravity on the Death Star, it would be to prevent Rebel ships from escaping into hyperspace. Gravity fields disrupt hyperspace, dragging ships back into normal space if they come to close to one. In the EU, the Empire creates an entire class of ships (Interdictor-cruisers) for that express purpose.
      • Also, the whole battle was taking place above Endor, a planet-sized moon with a lot more mass than the Death Star. If anything Executor should have fallen onto it. In addition, the presence of Endor negates the possibility of the Death Star putting out a strong gravitational field, otherwise having it in such a low orbit over the moon would have caused major tidal effects.
    • Another possibility is that the Executor was in the middle of a maneuver that involved turning in that direction, and the pilot was killed before he could complete the maneuver and turn back away from the Death Star. A third possibility is that the pilot yanked on the controls in any old direction in order to try to shift the ship so that Arvel Crynyd's A-wing wouldn't crash into the bridge and kill them all.
    • If you look you can see flames coming from the engines just before it hits the Death Star. At least it does in the DVD version I can't remember if it was there in the original.

  • Couldn't the Rebels just bomb the shield generator from orbit?
    • And wasted hours getting the ships close enough and aiming the shots, all while allowing "bullet-proof" space ships to take pot shots at you on a whim? Not exactly subtle...
      • They had, like, a lot of ships didn't they? Some of them bomb, other fight off the Empire, what's the problem? And what do you mean by bullet-proof?
      • They didn't have a lot at all compared to the Empire, so speed was essential. They needed to get in and destroy the Death Star as fast as possible to prevent being completely wiped out. By "bullet-proof" I was referring to the station itself, which would be completely invincible until the shield was down. Having to separate their squadron into two distinct forces had a much larger chance of failure then showing up with the generator already down (which was the intention) and going full-throttle against the Death Star.
      • True, but their plan relied on a rather wild hope that the generator wouldn't be dully defended, which failed miserably and would've doomed the whole operation if it wasn't for...ugh...Ewoks. Orbital bombardment looks somewhat more reliable to me. Besides, in the end it wasn't the capital ships that took out the DS but a squadron of fighters. But even discarding the idea of bombardment, wans't there ANY contigency plan in stock? Like a full scale assault on the generator with hundreds of troops and heavy weapons once it was clear that the covert operation failed. Nothing at all?
      • The generator itself is protected by its own impenetrable forcefield.
    • As noted above, Endor itself was fully shielded; the only way that the Rebel team could get down to the surface would be if they were cleared by the defense fleet to enter the shield. There's no other way to get troops onto the surface - especially after the assault began. Orbitally bombarding the shield would have been useless, as planetary shields are designed to take that kind of abuse and laugh at it.
      • In fact, if I remember correctly, the weapon devised to get around that sort of shielding? The Death Star.
      • It was never meant to be implied that their plan was perfect or even the ideal solution, but there are clear reasons why they chose it and not a straight rush in and start shooting. Ideally, the way their plan was envisioned, the shuttle got them down to the planet, nobody detected them, and they either deactivated or destroyed the generator swiftly while the armada shows up in orbit simultaneously. So in theory, the plan was sound. And really, I don't think they had time or resources for a "backup plan". It's a relatively small force of dedicated soldiers and pilots up against the might of practically the entire Empire. Think U.S.A vs. Malta.
    • The Rebel Alliance did not have the hundreds of troops, tanks, or warships necessary to mount the kind of assault you and so many others are talking about. Yes, the chances of success would be much higher if they sent a massive armada to bomb the living crap out of the planet, and a powerful force of armor and infantry would also stand to do much better than a small force of infiltrators, but the fact that they are "The Rebel Alliance" and not "The Astoundingly Well-Equipped Anti-Imperial Ass-Kickers" means that their options do not include those two infinitely preferable strategies.
    • Simple: a stealth mission would have a higher chance of success. The generator was guarded by the entire Imperial Navy. A small, land-based infiltration force had a better chance, just like how a small squadron of fighters had a better chance of taking out the Death Star than a frontal assault.
    • Fact is the rebels did not know a huge fleet was behind the corner waiting for them. Every information the Bothan net provided was leaked on purpose by the emperor. Rebels thought the death star was -relatively- low defended (the executor being there was no mystery though) because of the shield generator making a fleet unnecessary. If they really came in and attempted to destroy the generator through brute force the empire would have had enough time to respond to the attack with other ships in the area. Instead they tried to blow up the generator, drop in, blow the thing and get out before a serious response showed up, which is the usual Rebel hit-and-run MO. Also they had to move quickly because the intel they received indicated that DS weaponry was not yet functional, not yet, that is. Could not risk to wait. Must give credit to the emperor for a really well set-up trap, too bad he screwed it all up by giving fancy orders to his fleet (troops losing to a bunch of Ewoks wasn't exactly his fault though).

  • It just bugs me that Darth Vader, or I guess I should say Anakin as he was redeemed at this point, suffocates to death on the Death Star. Sure his iron lung was short-circuited but you would think that the space ship that Luke escaped on would have had medical technology that could sustain a person's general health and oxygen until Anakin could be brought to a medical facility and his suit and especially his iron lung repaired. I have watched the Return of the Jedi for years and yet when I watched it recently this struck me as odd, we have breathing masks in our modern day air crafts for goodness sake; you mean to tell me that in a universe that has faster than light space travel they can't afford to have some damn breathing masks, oxygen masks, or space suits that provide air for you to have where the airless void of space will kill you if anything happens to your ship?
    • Well A. what's the likelihood that a shuttle, picked at random out of possibly a whole bay of things will have a hyperbaric chamber, and B. it takes more than a breath-mask to overcome Vader's issues, remember his lungs are pretty-much shot without the equipment, plus he picked up a few bolts from Palpatine turning pretty-much into totally. Oh and C. he'd be brain-dead by the time Luke had got thing half-way back to the fleet, and D. he's a mass-murderer at best, so it's possible that someone would deliberately botch something anyway.
    • Yeah, you're making way too many assumptions for what a run-of-the-mill shuttle would have as far as medical equipment. In addition to the above, don't forget E. He never made it to the ship. Even if the ship was a fully staffed, fully equipped medical frigate, even Star Wars tech isn't going to be able to do much to a corpse.
      • A. This is explained by scientists who are researching the field of advanced space travel, noting that any ship flying through space is going to want to have full-fledged medical facilities on board because as vast as the universe is you may be wandering space for months or even years at a time depending on where you are headed (and that's if you have faster-than-light space travel) and some random escape pod with only an oxygen supply is not going to last you if it can't also provide food, water, and medical equipment to help you if you get injured or sick. Now granted this is just a small ship and there is a nearby fleet and forest moon for Luke to land on but it should at least have some sort of equipment.
      • B. Before Vader underwent his surgery he was put on a medical capsule that provided a breathing mask for his damaged lungs, obviously breath masks can at least sustain him until he can get to a proper medical facility in the Fleet. Besides breathing masks utilize sterilized and clean oxygen just like the air that was used in the chamber that Vader was repaired in, Vader can breath with purified oxygen, regular oxygen has pollutants that would infect his scarred lungs and he would die of infection and lack of oxygen.
      • C. Explained in part B.
      • D. Now this is a fair point that someone would botch Vader's surgery out of revenge for what he has done but we have the fact that Vader would be a political prisoner of the highest order for the rebellion, being the Supreme Commander of the entire Galactic military Vader has more inside knowledge on the Empire than anyone next to that of the now-dead Emperor himself. Vader's survival would end the war with the Empire faster than without him that is for sure, and Luke could plead this to the Rebels as a bargaining fee for his father's life and if not at least Anakin can be executed for his crimes knowing he helped the Rebellion end the war with the Empire.
      • E. Yes he did they where on the hanger door of the ship, Anakin told Luke to stop trying to save him believing that nothing could stop his death now.
      • Well A. that was a shuttle, not a long use spaceship, and so the changes of having anything more advanced than a medikit on board were fairly remote (when was the last time you saw a medical facility on a commercial airliner?), which answers both B. And C. as well. For D. looking at what happened after RotJ, I highly doubt he'd have had any value as a political prisoner since very few in the Empire actually liked him. And E. he probably aimed Luke at the nearest shuttle bay, not the best equipped.
      • A. Realistic space travel would require decades, or even hundreds of years, to go from place to place, when you have to wait that long to get to your destination then yes even your escape pods need to be fully staffed as if they were space ships in and of themselves. Now granted Star Wars isn't completely realistic but I would expect something medically relevant to be on ships even if they can get to where they need to go in hours or days. If A is valid then B and C should still apply. D. Since when did whether or not lower-ranked officers liked their commander translate to him not knowing anything about military operations? Supreme Commanders in our world dictate how wars are fought so Vader should be no different, Vader's rank means he can give orders that outrank any other officer's orders and his orders are ultimately the go-to orders that decide how the war is fought, as he is second in command to the Emperor himself, and would know the Galactic military inside out since he commands it. E. It was never said that Luke went for the best equipped, but I would realistically expect to see at least a spare space suit or breathing mask that would be used for the sake of survival if the void of space leaks in and sucks the air out of the ship.
      • Well space travel in SW takes place in days, not years, and this is a shuttle than can go dozens of light-years a day (assuming it takes a week to get to Endor), so the distance thing has no relevance, and furthermore, Luke grabs a shuttle, which, surprise surprise, would have to be completely outfitted to keep Vader alive, otherwise it probably only bandages and a few anti-biotics on board. Also, how much 'specific' information would Vader have that the rebellion didn't already know, and as for giving orders, the were Admirals prepared to openly rebel against unquestionable authority, there are a lot more who'd be prepared to rebel against Vader, especially in light of the fact that the Emporer died in mysterious circumstances. Oh, and as for equipment, Vader was a big guy, there was probably no way to get him into a normal space-suit, and no way to seal a normal space-suit helmet around his head.
      • Vader survived severe third degree burns and triple dismemberment through the use of a medical capsule, which surprise, surprise, had oxygen that sustained him until proper surgery could be conducted. Having a malfunctioning suit is better than being burned and having no suit, a supply of oxygen, which any reasonable air or space craft would need regardless of how far it can travel in whatever speed, should have kept his condition stable and that is all I have to say about that. How much do you think the Executive Branch of America knows what the President knows, they pretty much share information with each other on a regular basis so there are very few intelligence gaps between the President and his cabinet, Vader is the same way with the Admirals and the Emperor, and any rebellion he would face Vader would have crushed. Luke does have a lightsaber, a quick surgery via cutting off the robotic parts of Vader's body could allow a space suit to fit if there were no other oxygen supplies.
    • Hey, guess what? Vader was mortally wounded. He explicitly says that he's going to die, and his suit has onboard medical equipment that says, in much more technical terms, that he's going to die.
      • And the dismemberment of 3 of his limbs, severe volcanic burn scars, and the days of surgery that put him in his suit in the first place with no anesthetic weren't mortal wounds? Hell Vader in the expanded universe has been through all sorts of abuse, explosions, lightsaber wounds, severe blunt force trauma to his body, and had his armor broken down to the point his skin underneath is exposed and even had his helmet damaged and knocked off. He always got his suit repaired after each and every one of these incidents and continued on his Imperial business, and they were never written off as "mortal" wounds that would stop him, the Emperor as powerful as he was could not stop Vader from continuing his march to the reactor shaft that he threw his master down despite the barrage of Force lightning. That is a mortal wound rather than all the other stuff Vader has been through?
      • Well the dismemberment and surgery were no issue to his health, but he was right on the edge from breathing volcanic gases, and the surgery that saved his life probably pushed him too far over the top to survive without it.
      • The issue lies with the Rebellion. Even if Luke somehow managed to get Vader to a nearby medical facility, what's he going to say to everyone there? Think they're just going to drop 20+ years of hatred for Vader and work on a way to save his life just because Luke told them to? Of course, not to mention the fact that if Luke begged people to heal Vader, they'll think he's defecting. Vader did it because it was better this way. He dies redeemed and Luke can escape a hero.
      • Vader is the commander of the Imperial military and was Palpatine's trusted(ish) associate for decades. Can we say intelligence asset anyone? I would bet that if Rebel med techs could have saved him, they would have tried to. On top of that, you not only have the medical person's mindset of 'do everything you can to heal this person despite who he might be' and the little fact that the only real medical personell you see in the films are DROIDS, who would presumably not have much in the way of grudge-holding capacity...
      • A breath mask is not the same thing as an iron lung, folks. The mechanisms in the suit physically push super-oxygenated air into his lungs via a small hole in his trachea below his voice box so he can breathe. That's just been shorted out by Palpatine, along with probably most of the other mechanical equipment sustaining Vader, and his prosthetics. A fair number of his internal organs are cybernetics at that point too- including his heart- so basically anything short of a full stasis pod probably wouldn't have kept him alive long enough to get medical help.
      • Also, for what it's worth, I always got the impression that Vader wanted to die. Having killed the Emperor and reconciled with his son, he now has nothing left to live for.
      • Let's not forget that Vader took a *massive* amount of electricity when he was tossing Palpatine into the shaft. having your life support system completely shorted out when you can't even breathe on your own is bad enough to kill you, but add in being *Dragged* through the death star on top of it? Yeah, no chance.
      • Also, I don't think "Anakin survived Mustafar" can really be used to say he should have survived Palpatine's lightning. In real life, people survive horrific-looking injuries sometimes, and they sometimes die from seemingly mild injuries that happened to hit the right vital spot. Anakin survived for several hours after being burnt alive; that he only survived a few minutes after the force lightning shows that, regardless of the details, those injuries were even more serious and lethal than what happened on Mustafar. As for a likely reason why: the lightning didn't just turn his suit off, it fried all the metal along with every bit of flesh connected to it. His organs were probably roasted, his heart was likely going through massive electricity-induced arrhythmia and cardiac arrest, and that's on top of the damage that the suit no longer working was causing (and assuming force lightning doesn't have any corrosive dark-side effects that no medical science could deal with). As Anakin himself said when Luke protested removing the helmet (thinking that it'd kill him), nothing could have saved him at that point.
      • Also, the ravages of time. Anakin was a young, strong man at the peak of Jedi padawan martial arts training who willed himself to survive out of love for his wife. Decades later, Vader was an old man whose physical body hadn't been exercised in years (tell me how you're going to do cardio training with three prosthetic limbs?) who had just realized how much of an asshole he'd really been all that time, but saw redemption as a Force Ghost only seconds away.
      • Also, this isn't an RPG, where you heal up after getting beaten up after a night's sleep. Darth Vader's suit was all that was keeping him alive after Mustafar. Without that, he's boned. As demonstrated.
      • And don't forget, Palpatine sensed Anakin's agony when he got maimed on Mustafar, so would've brought a full suite of medical equipment, medical droids included, along when he retrieved him. Luke probably doesn't even know how to work whatever medical gear a standard shuttle would be equipped with, and if the gear is automatic, it probably wouldn't be programmed to deal with something as bizarre as a mangled, aging cyborg of a unique, probably outdated design.
    • There's one key point you guys seem to be missing here, in his first few days as a Sith Lord, Anakin was as strong in the Dark Side of the force as he would ever get (did you miss his bright yellow iris'?). The only thing keeping him going after Obi-Wan left him for dead was pure, blind, seething hatred for Sidious, Obi-Wan, Padme, the Jedi Order and each and every aspect of his life. After he calmed and realized what he had done to Padme, he was filled with a self-loathing that would haunt him for decades up until he saved his son from Sidious. At that point, he finally let go of decades of torment, sadness, and anger. He couldn't keep going because the anger that kept him 20 years earlier had left him long ago. He was just an, old, tired man who had finally been released of his torment and now just wanted to die.
      • Vader has several other internal cybernetic implants in addition to the iron lung, you can see them when he's being electrocuted. They were probably shorted out. Also Sith lighting is very nasty stuff, Luke actually got a lethal dose off of the emperor here and had to have treatment in the follow up book.

  • Classic question I know but what was the reactor core for the Death Star doing in the Emperor's throne room? Some sort of twisted symbolism of how his throne should be near the "heart" of the Empire's military might? Regardless of his intent I wouldn't want to be near a reactor core if I didn't know how to stop the numerous technical issues that can come up in reactors.
    • They needed some way to kill the Emperor, and throwing him down a shaft was what they decided on.
      • George Lucas must have had quite a time explaining that plot point at the drawing board, "OK guys so the Emperor is going to be electrocuting Luke near his personal reactor shaft stationed in his throne room and then Vader now redeemed as Anakin saves his son by throwing him down said reactor shaft. Any objections?"
    • Because its nowhere near the reactor core. There's a tower on the Death Star's "North" pole where the Emperor's observation tower was located. The shaft in question is....just a shaft. When you get thrown down a shaft and fall hundreds of meters before hitting something hard and metallic, you tend to suffer instant death.
      • At the bottom of the shaft is a ball of pure energy, which looks exactly like the reactor core of the Death Star that Lando and company blast in order to destroy the Death Star. It is unlikely that it is a different core then the one we see destroyed, the fall would have killed the Emperor on impact but the pure ball of energy he fell into wouldn't have helped.
      • There is no ball of energy at the bottom of the shaft. And if there is, it has nothing to do with the core of the station. The massive expanding energies that come from that scene are the dark forces Palpatine was in control of leaving his body when he dies. Basically... he exploded into blue energy. And before anyone says that is ridiculous, it is George Lucas (or was) and the whole universe of Star Wars is ridiculous, so how is this any less probable?

  • The Super Star Destroyer Executor loses its shields, and moments later an A-Wing crashes into the bridge. After this, the huge, gigantic, MASSIVE ship crashes directly into the Death Star, killing all on board. You're telling me that on a ship that size, there are NO redundant control systems? No damage control teams? No engineering section to say "Holy crap, we just lost the main bridge," and take control of the ship? That's just poor design.
    • If I remember correctly, the thing crashes less than a minute after the thing crashes into the bridge. Given the rest of the battle going on, it might've taken a few more seconds than it should have for the rest of the crew to realize what had happened, and they didn't have time to pull the ship out of the Death Star's gravity (it might also have been too close to that as well) before it crashed.
      • It's a 19 km long starship, the resources alone should have mandated a backup command centre if not a string of them. With a design that stupid they virtually deserved to lose it.
      • The Executor did have backup control centers, including a fully-functioning secondary bridge. It's just that the Executor was already in the Death Star II's gravity well and was being pulled into the station before anyone could react in time to save the ship. Watch RotJ again: The Executor starts falling immediately after Crynyd (the A-Wing pilot) crashed into the bridge, and within seconds is in a straight-vertical dive. Even if command and control was transferred to the secondary bridge, it would still take several seconds before anyone figured out what the hell was going on, or for the transfer of command and control between the two stations to finish.
      • I'm no scientist, but shouldn't the largest concentration of mass have been attracted to the DSII, rather than the smallest (that is, the tiny point of its nose)? Also, why did the ship suddenly disappear as it exploded? (sarc)
      • It gets worse when you remember that the whole battle was taking place in low orbit above a planet-sized moon. If gravity were really the deciding factor then Executor should have crashed on Endor.
      • Don't forget the ship had the entire Rebel Fleet pounding on it. Maybe a combination of physical and ion damage prevented (or at least slowed) the transfer to the backups.
      • That's the most plausible explanation, because really, for a ship that size you should be running the battlebridge in full duplex, so that the changeover takes milliseconds.
      • "Concentrate all fire on that Super Star Destroyer!" Yeah, I'm fairly certain that was a contributing factor to Executor's destruction.
      • All the pointless little changes Lucas made to the Special Editions, and he never bothered to improve the destruction of the Executor, which is one of the most underwhelming explosions of a 19 km long starship crashing into an artificial dwarf planet I've ever seen. Then again, both Death Star explosions and the Alderaan explosion are equally lacking. They are too "sparkly"; just adding a Praxis ring isn't a substitute for throwing solid-looking debris in all directions.
      • E=mc^2. Matter can be transformed into energy, and energy into matter. I always assumed the explosions were so intense that all the matter was transformed into the energy you see. There literally was no debris.
      • Except that if you converted something as massive as Executor directly into energy the out put would briefly exceed that of an average star. The rebels wouldn't have needed to hit the reactor, Executor's destruction should have destroyed the Death Star. But then, technically the Death Star's destruction should have destroyed Endor.
      • You can see flames coming from the engines just before it hits the Death Star there was other damage.

  • Wouldn't the destruction of an object the size of the Death Star in orbit above it also have resulted in the destruction of the Ewok's homeworld in The Return of the Jedi?
    • Sigh.
      • Yeah well I don't care what the canon says, the death-star had a volume of like 2.5 billion cubic kilometres (taking account of the unfinished section, and even in 99% gets disipated across the galaxy that still leaves 25 million cubic km behind, and even if only 1% of that were to hit Endor then that's 1/4 million cubic km of debris. You'd have to throw out the laws of physics not to flatten half the nearside forests in Tunguska-like explosions or worse.
      • Canon-wise, the destruction of the reactor core apparently created a wormhole due to the exotic fuel used. Thus, most of the mass was flung about the galaxy, and the rest was shot down the Alliance.
      • You read the numbers right? 1/100th of 1% is still enough for probably extinction-level devestation. Hels, even 1/10,000th of 1% would a pretty serious issue.
    • The Alliance shot down multiple pieces of debris entering the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds? Really?
    • And wouldn't the re-entry friction of so much material actually have caused fires across the planet?
    • And how about the fact that any of the pieces that survived re-entry hit Endor would almost certainly been radioactive due to the Death Star's reactor being destroyed? Toxic wastelands,anyone?
      • WRT all of the above: Endor's planetary shield blocked all of the debris.
      • Well A) Endor had no planetary shield, it was protecting the Death Star, and B) the shield generator blew up before the Death Star did (in fact they had to blow the shield up to be able to get at the Death Star).
      • It is quite possible that there were not one, but two shield generators on Endor. One to protect the Death Star and one to protect that one. We don't see the other one becuase once they are on the planet, it's not relevant.
      • Except that we have nothing to suggest there were two shields on Endor. It's much simpler (and probably more accurate) to assume that Lucas just wanted the plot to go a certain way without necessarily thinking out all the steps.
      • No, there was a shield that protected Endor itself. That's why the rebels only sent a ragtag team on Endor: because access to the planet was severely restricted.
      • And even if it wasn't mentioned, it would make sense to make one: the Empire may have realised that the Rebels/traitorous members of the Empire would try to counter the Death Star with another planet-destroying weapon. Thus they gave Endor a shield generator so this theoretical planet buster can't remove the world giving theirs the defence shield.
      • That's not Fridge Brilliance. The resources required to make a Planet Buster is far above what the Rebels could muster (that fleet they had was everything spaceborne). There was a shield on Endor, though it's not clear whether it covered the whole planet or it was simply a dome that protected the area around the installation, nor whether it was part of the same installation that was protecting the Death Star as that would mean the Rebels destroyed the moon's shield at the same time. If there was a Shield Generator outside of the Death Star's protecting the whole planet, how did the Rebels make a surface landing?
      • The Rebels made a surface landing because they gave a passcode and Vader gave the order to let them land on the planet. That all happens right on screen.
    • Look, this is really very simple. The rebels had a Jedi on hand. He did it.

  • Why is the collapse of the Empire seen as a "good thing" at the ending? The Emperor's only potential successor was also dead, so wouldn't everything simply collapsed in the ensuing power vacuum?
    • Because the Empire was a evil, Sith-backed totalitarian government based on racism, tyranny, and fear. There would undoubtedly be squabbling between warlords in the vacuum for a bit, but the Rebels would be able to take over, as they'd probably gain more support after Palpatine's death. And really, anything is better then a government that destroys planets to root out rebellion.
    • This always bugged me too. When you really look at it, was the empire really that evil? Prior to the establishment of clones, the Imperial Military could be interpreted as an all volunteer force of, presumably, millions if not billions if not trillions of people. Even after the introduction of clones to the canon, the EU establishes that the vast majority are volunteers. Volunteers who, based on their actions, believed in the cause they were fighting for. Countless stormtroopers and fighter pilots laid down their lives to preserve the longstanding order that the Empire had established. On top of that, the rebels are very few in number, which indicates that the majority of the civilian population of the galaxy is largely ambivalent toward the empire. In fact, if you consider the Clerks argument (civilian contractors on the Death Star II and personal politics), a large amount of the civilian populace actually supports the Empire.
      • In contrast, look at the rebels. What exactly were they fighting for? Perhaps I've stumbled upon a bit of Fridge Brilliance here. If you (tying in with an above sentiment of people in the future looking back) think of the events as a propagandized version of history, then the one-sided nature of the story (as in "Good vs Evil) makes a bit more sense.
      • *coughcough* Alderaan *cough*
      • The Empire used slavery on aliens and permanent conscription on humans as well. Imperial Stop Loss Order, or I'm Milking Scragged, Life Over. And the A New Hope radio drama mentions "reeducation camps".
      • RE: The Clerks argument and the 'civilian contractors', what a lot of people who cite it as part of a "was the Empire really that evil/were the Rebels really that good?" argument tend to forget/ignore is that in the very same scene, someone else essentially points out that those civilian contractors were working on a huge-ass battleship (called The Death Star, for cryin' out loud — how big a clue do you need?) being constructed for the military of a powerful empire that was embroiled in an ongoing conflict, and had to know on some level the dangers they were facing and what they were potentially getting themselves in for even if they choose not to acknowledge it (and if they genuinely didn't know what they're getting themselves in for they are, at best, very naive). Volunteers or not, civilians or not, if you work building battleships during a war you don't get to cry foul if someone from the other side tries to drop a bomb on you to stop you building battleships. As for whether the Empire was bad just because it managed to get people to support/volunteer for it, that, frankly, means absolutely diddly— hate to go Godwins, but people supported/volunteered for the Nazis. And most of them did so not out of genuine commitment but because they were terrified of the consequences of not doing so. Popular support (or the appearance of same) doesn't make you right/good.
    • Zahn's books cover this somewhat. In fact it was Zahn who invented the more "friendly" Imperial Remnant common in the "New Republic" EU publishing era (read: everything between Return of the Jedi and the New Jedi Order series). Many of Zahn's books ask the question; what would the galaxy have been like if the Empire weren't ruled by a crazy Dark-side-obsessed narcissist? His books also point out that the New Republic is also not perfect and pretty much all of the "New Republic" era is focusing on the massive fallout, wars, rebellions, and power struggles that take place after hte collapse of the Empire.
    • Why should everything collapse? In canon the Rebel leaders take a great deal of power in the new order (much like real life) and most of the galaxy would have had a long history of self-rule with just a twenty year blip of imperial rule. As for why it was considered a good thing...the Empire's murders, discrimination against nonhumans and tendency to blow up planets might have had something to do with it.
      • Episode VII is coming out, so Sequel Hook. Also we know that the Empire being run the way it is bad because a)People don't like totalitarianism, especially since people had a democracy(thus no general Values Dissonance like, say, early civilization), b)Willing to threaten rebels with a planet destroying weapon, which is the galactic equivalent of the United States threatening to nuke cities if they rebel, c)just LOOK at them and d)they have Palpatine as Emperor. And I'm not even mentioning the Expanded Universe.

  • The Death Star IIs construction. They way it was constructed seems completely illogical and impractical, as it's being built in a way that looks like it barely came out of battle.
    • What? What's wrong with it? How do you think you're supposed to build a moon?
      • They could start with building a frame, at least.
      • The thing was over 900km in diameter, building a frame first would have been immensely illogical and impractical given the size of some of the things they had to fit in there.
      • Why do you need a frame for something being constructed in zero G?
      • It might help when the thing you're building is large enough to have it's own significant gravitational field. However, anti-gravity technology in the SW universe once again makes this less of a counterpoint. Not to mention a big point in the space battle is that they got the main weapon online long before it was expected to be finished. They probably started with everything they needed for the big gun, and just built around it.
      • Correct. The novel Darksaber even has a ship that is, specifically, just the weapon with a basic spaceship built around it (that winds up looking a lot like a giant lightsaber, thus the name). The Rebellion seems to have been under the impression that the entire facility was necessary for the Death Star's weapon to function... turns out that Palpatine actually just intended for it to be that large so it could be massively intimidating and house a ton of soldiers as his new seat Imperial of power, a kind of Mobile Oppression Palace.
    • I think I've been over this before on the archives page, and it's the same reason why Randall in Clerks shouldn't have feared so much for the construction workers: it was obviously never meant to look complete, or at least not until after the Battle of Endor. Remember that they were luring the rebellion into a trap (no, I'm not going to say it). They wanted them to think that the Death Star was still too incomplete to be operational when in fact it was working just fine. The incomplete look was a large part of the ruse. They were good to go, as they proved. Probably afterward they would have brought the construction crew back but for the time being this was exactly how the Death Star was meant to be.

  • When Han goes into the carbonite, his arms are bound, but not when he comes out. What happened to his restraints?
    • Maybe they were biodegradable?
    • More likely, they were remote released. Han was thus in the process of reaching up to try and haul himself out when they started blasting him with carbonite, explaining why he's in the position he is. Either that, or the moment he was lowered out of sight he started furiously picking the damn things and got them off, and in another moment would have hauled himself out of there.

  • Excuse me if this one's already been done to death, but during the Sarlacc pit fight, why does near-blind Han ask Chewie to pass him the blaster so he can shoot the tentacle that's grappling Lando? If Chewie can hold Han's weight up with one hand in order to pass the weapon to his partner, why couldn't the Wookiee have fired it at the tentacle himself? His vision wasn't impaired, and his manual dexterity is good enough to work on the Falcon's electronics without difficulty.
    • In the Expanded Universe, Han is repeatedly described as the better shot. The two have worked together long enough that Chewie probably knows that.
    • Because Han has a giant ego and always assumes he is the best person for the job, any job, regardless of actual ability. By the time Chewie had talked him out of it Lando would be in the Sarlacc's belly. Plus Chewie probably still holds a little bit of a grudge against Lando for the whole betraying them to the Empire thing. Sure he might not actively do anything, but if the half-blind Han either misses and lets Lando get eaten, or nails the traitor by accident, hey I bet the Wookie wouldn't be losing much sleep over it.

  • What exactly was Luke intending to do when he threw away his lightsaber and defied the Emperor?
    • He was intending not to fall to the dark side.
      • Holding onto the lightsaber was a temptation for Luke to strike down his father. When he saw Vader defeated and with his twisted form he knew that holding onto the lightsaber was a trap. To strike down his father would lead him to the dark side and would force him to become a twisted and evil slave of the Emperor just as Vader had been. Throwing away the lightsaber was symbolic of Luke's lack of desire to fight.
      • Which would have had the ultimate goal of getting himself (the last Jedi in the movies) killed and with the Emperor's intervention quite possibly destroying the rebel fleet. Yet one is giving in to the Dark Side and the other is the good thing to do.
      • A possible result, not the "ultimate goal". He was standing up for his principles.
      • Having the lightsaber wouldn't have made a difference at that point anyway, which is why throwing it away is just symbolic of Luke standing up for his moral principles and means that Luke was going for a Doomed Moral Victor gambit at that point. Emperor Palpatine was much more powerful than Luke was at that point, the Force Lightning that he uses was more potent than any other Dark Sider that had ever lived and could easily have knocked it out of Luke's hand. In a battle of the Force Luke was hopelessly outmatched and could do little but just sit there and suffer as Palpatine tortured him to death, only Vader had enough power to deal any harm to Palpatine. Unfortunately due to Vader's suit and its weakness to electricity attacking his master was a death sentence.
      • Wait, wasn't the Force Lightning a surprise? Maybe I solved this myself...he threw away his lightsaber, not expecting the Force Lightning, because how would he have known about it?
      • Even if Luke didn't suspect the Force Lightning nevertheless he should have realized that for Palpatine to be Vader's master, who knows how to use the Force, then he would also need to know how to use the Force. The lightsaber toss was a symbolic action for Luke, he was embracing the peace of the Jedi. Luke asking for Vader's help was him trying to reach out to his father one last time and as he soon realized Anakin loved Luke more than his Vader persona was capable of hating and more than his own life.
      • Luke understood that if he fell to the Dark Side, he would be a tool of more pain and destruction, and thus letting himself die was the option likely to lead to the less suffering for others. Which is why a later EU book that basically had him go to the Dark Side because "Gosh, maybe I ought to see what this is like since I've been preaching so hard against it" was so gorram stupid. But anyway, at that point between fighting further and letting himself die, Luke knew that the greater good would be best served by his death. It's basically showing that he learned the lessons Obi-Wan had been trying to teach him.

  • A medical question: Does Vader die from asphyxiation/suffocation, or was it the toxins in the air that polluted his weakened lungs? The Star Wars Wiki (or Wookieepedia) talks about how in sterilized air chambers Vader's lungs could process air but under normal circumstances his lungs would get infected from toxins in the air which is why he wears the respirator. The generally accepted answer is that Vader's lungs were just so weakened in general that breathing unassisted by the respirator was impossible. Which answer is more responsible?
    • He needs the iron lung in his suit to breathe properly.
    • He died from suffocation, because Palpatine had just shortened out his iron lung as the former was about to toss him down the reactor. Without the iron lung, Vader suffocated to death because he couldn't get enough air in to survive.

  • Okay, how come when Luke hit Jabba's mooks with his lightsaber they fell back instead of getting sliced?
    • Not sure how many mooks actually get hit with the blade, but it looked like quite a few of them were trying to get away from it. Unfortunately for quite a few of them, getting away from the blade meant being eaten by the Sarlacc.

  • How did the Imperials know that Han and his strike team had broken into the shield generator bunker on the forest moon? There were four stormtroopers, three of which were pursuing an Ewok with a speeder bike, while the other one had been captured/killed by the strike team. They even got a Rebel trooper to disguise himself as that scout trooper. So, even if the Emperor planned the whole thing as a trap, how did the stormtroopers know that the strike team was within the bunker at that exact moment? Even if they did know, wouldn't the Rebel trooper dressed as the scout trooper just say some bull about everything being fine?
    • When you have four guys manning a place, then they all mysteriously disappear, it's not hard to figure out what happened. Also, yeah, someone saying some bull about everything being fine worked great back in A New Hope, didn't it?
    • True but all that Rebel guy had to do was be like "Hey, some Rebels just fled into the woods/an Ewok stole a speeder bike. If you hurry, you could catch them! I'll stay here and guard the bunker."
    • They were expecting Rebels to show up. An Ewok steals their speeder, three guys go to chase him down, and the remaining scout trooper reports it. Any halfway competent security force expecting an infiltration will go on alert when someone steals a vehicle from the guards. Note how when the Rebels enter, they momentarily surprise the guards and workers in the power room, and then they get swarmed by Imperial troops. It was almost certainly a case of the guards going on alert after the theft, someone in the power room signaling the fully-anticipated intrusion, and the guards swarming them.

  • Why did Lando choose to reveal himself during the skirmish at the Sarlaac pit? Luke clearly didn't need help and Lando didn't even do anything to help. If anything, he ended up a hindrance. Lando should have acted still under-cover and that way if, for some crazy reason, the plan went sour, the heroes would still have an ace in the hole.
    • Um... he tries to help because he's on their side? And more practically, he reveals himself so that in all the chaos, no one who's on his side kills him because they mistake him for an actual Jabba mook?
    • Yeah, I'm real sure Luke would totally kill Lando accidentally. Everyone knew that Lando was on their side. What they didn't know was if they'd win the Sarlaac battle or not. What is the point of an "ace in the hole" if you don't keep him as an ace? Espescially during a battle where, if things went south, Lando could bail them out.
      • Things had already gotten as bad as they possibly could. They were in the middle of escaping an execution; they either escape or die trying. There would be no "later". There was also precious little Lando could do to continue blending in and not hinder the escape plan.

  • Why does Vader prevent Luke from killing Palpatine?
    • Vader needed Luke to get angry enough that he would fall to the Dark Side, not just kill an old man and then have a My God, What Have I Done? moment. Luke needed to actively embrace the Dark Side when he made his move against either the Emperor or Vader, so they took turns pushing his emotional ties until they could find the one that would accomplish this. Whomever he didn't kill would then become his master.

  • So, the Death Star construction started at the end of Episode III in it's structure and it was completely finished in episode IV, let's suppose that because of Luke and Leia's age they lasted at least 17 years building it. But in The Return of the Jedi just 3 years and a month have passed and the new Death Star was almost finished and fully functional. How could they build it so quickly this time?
    • It takes a lot longer to build something the first time than to build it a second time. The first time had to go through rounds of prototyping, development, and just plain trial and error. The second time, they'd already done the hard leg work, so they made some improvements and built over from what they already knew. Don't compare it to the time it took to go from zero to Death Star 1.0; compare it to the time it took to go from Death Star 0.9 to Death Star 1.0.

  • Why didn't Palpatine use the force to fly back up when Darth Vader threw him over the ledge.

  • After that Ewok has stolen a speeder bike, leaving all but one trooper to pursue him, Han Solo taps the one trooper on the shoulder and then runs away to where the rest of the commandos are. The stormtrooper follows and is captured. First of all, how could the trooper feel the tap on the shoulder when he's WEARING ARMOR? Secondly, why did he run after Han instead of blasting him?
    • Wearing armor doesn't mean you don't feel anything. Far from it. Seriously, tap someone on the shoulder who's wearing football pads, they'll notice. Second one, he probably wanted to capture him.
    • Ever wear football or hockey gear? You can still feel impacts with it because the padding hits you and the dude was carrying a pistol... that was on his stolen speeder from what I remember.

  • In Empire Strikes Back, Vader was pretty much like "Bwa ha ha! Luke join the dark side and we'll kill the Emperor and rule the galaxy together!" But here, he's all mopey and subservient, refusing to even contemplate betraying his master. Why didn't he try to convince Luke to team up with him to kill the emperor while they were walking to the throne room? Even if he couldn't turn him to the dark side at the moment, Vader could still point out that the emperor's death would be a boon for both of them.
    • It's a lot easier to plan against your super-powered, psychic boss when he's not in the next hallway over, probably listening to what you're up to through the Force.
    • Having your own son decide they'd rather die than be with you hurts. Luke rejects Vader in the most direct way possible, by hurling himself to his likely death at Cloud City rather than assume power with him. That has gotta hurt even the darkest of hearts, and I think it is reasonable to say that Anakin had built up a nice little domestic fantasy about himself and Luke together before that confrontation in Empire. Then when Luke survived and showed up still all idealistic and talking about redemption, that had to provoke more than a little introspection in even the darkest heart. Knowledge of the prequels helps, so if you watch the films in Machete Order it means Vader/Anakin's characterisation makes sense.