Lost And Found - TV Tropes

Lost And Found

You've got this trope sticking in your mind. You can remember the general idea, and maybe an example or two, but you'll be damned if you can remember what the thing's called, and the search function turns up nothing relevant. Ask about it here.
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Rikun
Medium:
11:43:30 PM 27th Apr 2015
Do we have a trope for when a normally fearless character gets scared out of their wits? For what I'm thinking of, circumstances become so unnerving that even this normally unflappable character is reduced to a trembling mess. Examples could be:

  • A hardened, psychopathic mercenary that's capable of every depraved act imaginable sees something so horrible even he feels nauseated.
  • A hardcore gangster that's seen just about everything runs into a vigilante who's so brutal it causes the gangster to beg for mercy.
  • A Complete Monster who witnesses/encounters something so horrible he or she creates standards they never realized existed.
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Freezer
11:43:30 PM 27th Apr 2015

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Nezumi
Medium: Videogame
09:17:58 PM 27th Apr 2015
edited by Nezumi
Is there an equivalent or equivalents to Not Using the Z Word for things other than fictional creatures (particularly thinking "locations"), or do those just count as variations on the trope?
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DAN004
07:55:01 PM 26th Apr 2015
You mean a real life location is referred by another name?

May be related to Istanbul Not Constantinople
Khantalas
11:49:55 PM 26th Apr 2015
Nezumi
07:51:01 PM 27th Apr 2015
... None of those are quite what I was thinking of. The specific example I was thinking of (but using those always seems to confuse people) was of a place that is very clearly intended to be our Earth (or an extremely similar parallel world), but is referred to exclusively as Terra — "Earth" isn't even mentioned in passing as an old name or something to confirm its identity to the audience.
rodneyAnonymous
08:10:37 PM 27th Apr 2015
jormis29
09:17:58 PM 27th Apr 2015
edited by jormis29
^^Calling Earth by the name Terra is covered by the Planet Terra trope

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Superjustinbros
Medium: Videogame
07:41:58 PM 27th Apr 2015
I'm looking for a trope that fits the following:
  • In Tomodachi Life, when two Miis get into a fight, it shows their relationship status' normal title, but with a question mark at the end. This is confusing when it occurs when on one of the lower relationship levels, especially the lowest, where "Not Getting Along" becomes "Not Getting Along?", implying the two Miis may not be fighting at all, even though they currently are when you check their relationship status.
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DAN004
02:59:51 PM 26th Apr 2015
Khantalas
11:52:40 PM 26th Apr 2015
If this happened anywhere else, I'd say Belligerent Sexual Tension or Vitriolic Best Buds, but in this case this sounds more like a bug in the code because someone forgot to made an exception for that relationship level.
Superjustinbros
07:41:58 PM 27th Apr 2015
Thanks Khantalas.

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CaveCat
Medium:
06:50:50 PM 27th Apr 2015
edited by CaveCat
Is there a trope for when one character is slated to do something for an important event, such as announcing at a ball game or maybe even making a speech at a curriculum, when an incident of some kind enables the first character unable to do what he was intended to do, so another character steps in for him? This was done in the VeggieTales in the House episode "Laura at Bat", when Jimmy gets hit by a ball while announcing the big ball game, so because of that, his brother Jerry takes over for him, even though Jerry was unable to announce properly at first.
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msfcatlover
Medium:
06:05:00 PM 27th Apr 2015
Hey, so, does anyone know if there's a "Mercy Backfire" trope? I've been looking, and I can't seem to find it... Basically, Character A spares Character B's life in some way out of genuine kindness, but B takes it as a "Fate Worse Than Death"? For example (the one that got me looking for this, infact,) in the movie Maleficent, one could argue that the king did what he did in order to save the life of his childhood sweetheart, but for Maleficent, losing her wings was a "To The Pain" level punishment. Or a "Proud Warrior Race Guy" might think the opponent sparing him simply thinks he's "Not Worth Killing," and react with the level of offense, rage, or dispair one would expect from the latter trope.

I just have a hard time believing this doesn't exist as a page yet? Does anyone know the name? Or, if it really diesn't exist, can we come up with some more examples so that someone can MAKE the page?
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Chariset
12:25:27 PM 27th Apr 2015
edited by Chariset
It's probably an unintentionally Cruel Mercy
DAN004
01:55:22 PM 27th Apr 2015
Scorpion451
04:17:54 PM 27th Apr 2015
jormis29
06:05:00 PM 27th Apr 2015

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Hatzeflatze
Medium: Videogame
03:37:09 PM 27th Apr 2015
Is there a trope for when the player character is able to pick up on radio messages (Usually but not exclusively Enemy Chatter along the lines of S/He's here!/We need backup!), without actually having the required equipment to intercept such messages? It's ubiquitous in GTA, Crysis, Borderlands, and a bunch of other series I can't remember right now.
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SolipSchism
03:37:09 PM 27th Apr 2015
edited by SolipSchism
Ace Combat does this too—although in that case it's less "lacking the equipment" and more "there's no way real-world militaries would be using the same unencrypted radio frequencies so that everything anyone says is heard by everyone else—not to mention you also somehow pick up civilian news broadcasts and police radios".

Ace Combat: Assault Horizon lampshades it when the enemy Ace Pilot starts talking, your wingman tells him to get the hell off this frequency, and the enemy replies that "Your encryption protocols are terrible," implying that the communication is encrypted, but he cracked it. Every other game plays it completely straight without mentioning it, though.

Edit: I checked with some other tropers and this would be a Sub-Trope of Enemy Chatter, but I do definitely think it's worth a Sub-Trope depending on the number of examples. Enemy Chatter is just dialogue between enemies, and doesn't require any radio equipment, which means it's generally pretty reasonable. I think this is more than distinct enough for a Sub-Trope, since it relies on the unspoken idea that everyone has a radio tuned to the exact same frequency, and it's not encrypted or protected in any way. Which, in many cases, is completely absurd.

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jayoungr
Medium: Film
02:29:48 PM 27th Apr 2015
Do we have a trope for when a character's ethnicity (but not race) changes in an adaptation? For instance, say character A is Russian in a book, but then a French actress is cast to portray her, so the character becomes French for the movie?
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DAN004
01:53:21 PM 27th Apr 2015
I believe we had a ykttw like that.
jayoungr
02:29:48 PM 27th Apr 2015
So we do—two, in fact, and the second even has five hats.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=aifmdpk8yrk81iri78o0377q http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=nw1dtswpkwirm2t35ytmqo8x

I see it's "up for grabs"—think I might take it over for launch, unless you want to, as it seems like something we should have.

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Kalaong
Medium:
01:54:57 PM 27th Apr 2015
edited by Kalaong
Do we have a trope for "realistic superhuman"? A combination of realistic and cinematic realms.

To quote Roger Ebert's review of The Hunted; "We've seen so many fancy high-tech computer-assisted fight scenes in recent movies that we assume the fighters can fly. They live in a world of gravity-free speed-up. Not so Friedkin's characters. Their fight is gravity-based. Their arms and legs are heavy. Their blows land solidly, with pain on both sides. They gasp and grunt with effort. They can be awkward and desperate. They both know the techniques of hand-to-hand combat, but in real life, it isn't scripted, and you know what? It isn't so easy. We are involved in the immediate, exhausting, draining physical work of fighting."
But also, Tom Brown, Jr., the primary consultant on the film is a bit ashamed of it despite this; "...the bloody knife fight at the end — no way it would last 4 minutes, any of those wounds are lethal."

In another example, enemies don't immediately go down just because Daredevil pastes them one. It can take a full minute for him to disable a single mook. On the other hand, just about anyone else - including most of the world's most exceptional military operatives - would lose if they tried to take on a dozen healthy, blooded mooks on their own ground while unarmed.

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eroock
12:36:36 PM 27th Apr 2015
edited by eroock
DAN004
01:54:57 PM 27th Apr 2015

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Fishbreath
Medium:
01:19:03 PM 27th Apr 2015
I ran across what feels like a common linguistic device on the Underhanded C Code Competition web page: its tagline is, "The official perfectly innocent web page for law-abiding good guys."

Is there a trope for that sort of repeated-for-emphasis thing? It's kind of the inverse of Suspiciously Specific Denial.
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eroock
01:12:14 PM 27th Apr 2015
Micah
01:19:03 PM 27th Apr 2015
I would still call that a Suspiciously Specific Denial. It doesn't matter if you're denying something by saying "We're not doing this" or "We're doing the opposite of this"; it's a denial either way.

Note, for example the link from Suspiciously Specific Denial to Legitimate Businessmen's Social Club, in which the denial functions in exactly this way.

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Tsukireiko
Medium:
01:11:29 PM 27th Apr 2015
Is there a trope for when a person confesses something to someone (maybe that they love them, maybe their identity,) but whoever is supposed to hear it does NOT hear it, either because there's too much noise around them, or because the recipient fell asleep? something like that?
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LavaSkies
02:47:18 PM 25th Apr 2015
edited by LavaSkies
The Un Reveal perhaps?

Although that is about what the audience learns, not the character.
eroock
01:11:29 PM 27th Apr 2015
For "because there's too much noise" we have Plot-Based Voice Cancellation.


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MarqFJA
Medium:
12:59:45 PM 27th Apr 2015
edited by MarqFJA
Do we have a trope for when the Iconic Outfit of a character's original incarnation is subjected to a number of changes for a different version of the character (be it in an official reboot, an Ultimate Marvel-style alternate universe adaptation, or even in fan work), with the new outfit still obviously resembling the original one, yet also visibly different? (Tentative name: Adaptational Costume Update)

Adaptations of comic book superheroes into live-action or animated format are rife with examples of this.
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DAN004
06:32:00 AM 26th Apr 2015
Doesn't sound that tropeworthy to me
Scorpion451
01:29:23 PM 26th Apr 2015
Not Wearing Tights, Civvie Spandex, Spandex, Latex, or Leather, Movie Superheroes Wear Black, Adaptational Modesty, ... those are some of the more common ones.

There's also Clothes Make the Legend for why even a Legacy Character can't change up the costume too much.
eroock
12:59:45 PM 27th Apr 2015
Also see Art Evolution.

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Bushpigg
Medium:
12:30:57 PM 27th Apr 2015
edited by Bushpigg
firstly medium: largely something I see in comics, but that wasn't a choice.

What trope is it when one member of a team screws everything they are working towards because they are just impatient?

The specific example I am thinking of (though I can't remember the source material, I think it was a DC animation) was two people interrogating a suspect, one is just about to get through and the suspect is beginning to spill his guts when the other is like, screw it and assaults him, shutting him up and ruining everything.

another example is Misty Knight when she tranqs moon-boy instead of listening to colleen wing because all she is interested in is getting their mark (since they have been told they need moon-boys dna because he might have the cure for cancer)in the process she ruins moon-boy's trust in colleen and that gets them almost eaten by devil dino.
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Bushpigg
05:26:44 AM 25th Apr 2015
thanks in advance to anyone who tries to answer my question
eroock
05:35:07 AM 25th Apr 2015
Bushpigg
06:09:45 AM 25th Apr 2015
edited by Bushpigg
Leeroy Jenkins seems ALMOST like what I am talking about, except it seems more like people rushing into danger and/or ignoring laid out plans. rather, what i am talking about is someone ruining something that is clearly working, though not necessarily dangerous or planned, just because they can't be bothered waiting or more specifically analysing the situation. think of every superhero when their "love" is in "danger" but it turns out their actions to save them threw whatever was going on out the window because they just had no idea wtf was going on.

Like for example if someone were connected to a machine, and someone else comes along and sees it and takes it upon themselves to remove that person, but in doing so kills them, or that person had volunteered to go in and taking them out stopped what they were doing.

Could just be a case of Leeroy being the best fit though, or that I am just mixing two tropes that seem similar to me into one, which probably isn't helped by the lack of similar tropes listed on the (decidedly multiplayer game focused) Leeroy page.
Bushpigg
12:40:17 PM 25th Apr 2015
I'm sorry, I really don't know how to phrase my question, but Leeroy really isn't what I am looking for. Thanks anyway, and I will try and figure out a better way to ask what I want, or a find better set of references to work off.

Cheers for giving it a shot though, it's appreciated.
randomsurfer
08:18:56 PM 25th Apr 2015
Not quite what you're describing, but I'm reminded of Interrupted Cooldown Hug and Won't Take "Yes" for an Answer.
eroock
12:30:57 PM 27th Apr 2015
Your examples are clear. See if Nice Job Breaking It, Hero does it for you.

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Lyner
Medium:
10:23:25 AM 27th Apr 2015
What trope(s) are there for a being that arrives somewhere to pass judgment on a place, be it as small as a city or as large as a world/universe, weighing the good and bad of the people to determine whether to put an end to things or not? In addition, is there a trope for the concept of a dual judge, in which one is there to find the weakness and/or corruption and prove why everything must go, while the other is there to show the strength/virtue and beauty and all the reasons to preserve?

I have one or two series that seem to be going down this path, and there are probably others that have, but the best example I know is This Ugly Yet Beautiful World. In this series, a being appears that apparently exists to eliminate some or all existing life and bring in new life that had had potential to exist but couldn't until now; the being accidentally split into two separate parts representing separate functions: the first was there to identify all the reasons to eliminate each particular organism and then carry out the destruction, while the other was there to show all the reasons to preserve the organisms and prevent the destruction of those things that must stay.
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eroock
10:02:52 AM 27th Apr 2015
For humans, Humanity on Trial.
Scorpion451
10:23:25 AM 27th Apr 2015
edited by Scorpion451
Hmm, this one's got a few layers. There's some shades of Just Before the End, The End of the World as We Know It, Divine Conflict, Götterdämmerung, End of an Age, Darkest Hour, and Balance Between Order and Chaos.

On a tightly focused scale, it can also be The Day of Reckoning and Knight of Cerebus.

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ZuTheSkunk
Medium:
09:15:12 AM 27th Apr 2015
Do we have a trope for when a character who previously appeared to be a single person, possibly even with a lifespan longer than that of a normal human, turns out to actually be just a secret identity used by multiple people, possibly over numerous generations?
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DAN004
10:22:49 AM 26th Apr 2015
SolipSchism
09:15:12 AM 27th Apr 2015
When it's not as long-term, there's also Collective Identity.

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Threefold
Medium: Live Action TV
07:11:13 AM 27th Apr 2015
This trope must be on here somewhere, but I can't remember ever seeing it. It applies to mainly to TV shows but can apply to pretty much any Long-Runner.

The trope I'm thinking of is when a show ends by making extensive references to its beginnings and recapturing the old magic. It may just be a matter of tone, but it may also bring back old characters, use old settings or even actively engage with the first episodes using flashbacks or time travel. Some examples are Lost, where the whole final season does this, Glee, where the final season restored the original premise and featured a full-episode flashback to the pilot, and outside of TV, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, which puts original characters back at the forefront and deals extensively with the story's beginnings, and Return of the Jedi, which re-uses a lot of stuff from A New Hope and puts Luke, Han and Leia's relationships back in focus.

Does this exist? Surely it must do! Thanks.
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DAN004
07:11:13 AM 27th Apr 2015

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Chariset
Medium:
05:42:30 AM 27th Apr 2015
We must have this one...

What is the trope for a character convincing someone of the truth of what he's saying by using Psychic Powers or similar to open his thoughts and memories to them so they can see it for themselves? This would also apply to cases where The Empath lets another person feel her emotions (e.g. to finally get through to her Love Interest that she really does love him, dammnit!)
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DAN004
02:58:30 PM 26th Apr 2015
Chariset
05:05:33 PM 26th Apr 2015
I suspect it's Exposition Beam.

There's nothing in there about "your memories are infallible proof of your sincerity", but it's close enough for jazz.
DAN004
07:57:05 PM 26th Apr 2015
edited by DAN004
One Piece: Viola, using her Giro Giro no Mi (Glare Glare Fruit) powers, can let others read her thoughts by looking to her eyes with her hand forming a "monocle" gesture. She does it to Sanji for him to see what she saw moments before the Straw Hats arrived to the island they're on.
Scorpion451
05:42:30 AM 27th Apr 2015
edited by Scorpion451
^^ Seconding Exposition Beam for both the OP and Dan's examples. There also is a line in there about the "proving something via mind-link" thing:
This also has the benefit of making even the staunchest skeptic at least give the expositor the benefit of the doubt

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DAN004
Medium:
10:34:34 PM 26th Apr 2015
Do we have a trope for when a prologue to a work does a recap of its previous installment/episode?
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Micah
09:02:32 PM 26th Apr 2015
Freezer
10:34:34 PM 26th Apr 2015

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DAN004
Medium:
07:49:19 PM 26th Apr 2015
What's the difference of Greater Scope Villain and Overarching Villain?
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Scorpion451
07:49:19 PM 26th Apr 2015
Greater Scope Villain- Alice the Superheroine typically deals with minor-league supervillains like Bob the Pigeon Master and Carl the Cornbender, stopping whatever lame attempt at villainy the latest sort-of-superpowered nutjob is up to in Suburbville. Except this week she spots Bob fanatically packing cages and bags of birdseed into the back of his Prius. Apparently, rumor has it that the supervillain Dethmäkker is in town. And is planning to use Suburbville to beta test the latest round of upgrades to his Dethböt Army before he tries them against Invincibleman in Grimdark City.

Overarching Villain- Alice does have one regular major threat villain, though: the Shadowwalker. This mysterious villain was responsible for the accident that gave Alice her superpowers, and seems to be the Bigger Bad to many of the threats she faces. She's come close to catching him a few times, and he's almost taken her out a few more, but he always seems to be one step ahead of her. When she's not busy stopping Bob's latest birdbrained scheme or a popcorn-maker-based-mecha, she's trying to figure out what the Shadowwalker's overarching plan for all of this is.

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TheMusicGirl
Medium: Western Animation
07:44:42 PM 26th Apr 2015
edited by TheMusicGirl
1. Consider the following lines:

"What's with the wait, Jennifer Slow-pez?" "What's your favorite movie? Squeal Magnolias?" (After someone has just been a snitch) "Who are you, Nagatha Christie?" (After someone is nagging the speaker)

These are all puns and plays on words, but do they each count as a Shout-Out?

2. A trope for when something is going wrong and a character, in front of a series of buttons/levers/whatever, presses and pulls everything in order to try and stop the wrongness.
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DAN004
04:05:05 PM 25th Apr 2015
I believe 2 is a Video Game Trope. Seen once in Crash Twinsanity, at least.
randomsurfer
08:13:34 PM 25th Apr 2015
edited by randomsurfer
2 might be Button Mashing.
Chariset
06:57:58 AM 26th Apr 2015
I think 2 would be a combination of What Does This Button Do? and Try Everything

As for 1, try our Pun index, though if all of your dialogue examples are from the same character, that might be just your garden-variety Pungeon Master
TheMusicGirl
07:44:42 PM 26th Apr 2015
edited by TheMusicGirl
I think Chariset is right about 1, it's a bunch of different characters, but someone had categorized them under Shout-Out and I didn't know if it counted!

As for number 2, I'm surprised there really isn't any that fit it exactly. The thing is, What Does This Button Do? could be (in this case, was) the reason that the crazy attempt at correcting the failing started. Try Everything is the same concept, but I'm looking for it occurring between characters in-show and not involving video games, which is why I was reluctant to go with Button Mashing. I had considered it at first but this usually occurs with things of high consequence within the storyline rather than a game.

I know I've seen other examples in media. Here's a gif that sort of demonstrates it. If there's two characters involved, a common exchange would be:

(something of consequence spirals out of control)
Alice: What did you do??
Bob: (while pressing all buttons/pulling all levers) I just pressed the red button to see what it would do!!
Alice: Well, fix it!!
Bob: I'M TRYING!

Bob could have also pressed the button in an attempt to resolve a pressing situation. I think we all understand the scenario but there isn't really a good fit somehow. Thanks for all your guys' help and if anybody finds anything closer, comment!

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alphaone
Medium:
01:13:25 PM 26th Apr 2015
Do we have that thing where somebody asks "Are you okay?" and the person responds "I'm more than okay". This seems to happen after a Face Heel Turn, especially after a power upgrade.

One example is in X-Men 3, with Logan asking Jean.
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Scorpion451
01:13:25 PM 26th Apr 2015
Might look at Stock Phrases to see if we already have it (not seeing it myself), but there can be No New Stock Phrases aside from adding it to the list of Other Stock Phrases.

Trope-wise, however, this is usually Heroic Second Wind or Came Back Strong.

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Chabal2
Medium:
06:52:13 AM 26th Apr 2015
An Iconic Item replaced with a modern version, like witches using vacuum cleaners instead of brooms, the Grim Reaper using a harvester instead of a scythe, etc.
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DAN004
10:49:36 PM 25th Apr 2015
Chariset
06:52:13 AM 26th Apr 2015
edited by Chariset
...psst.... if you want to hotlink a single word, put it in angle brackets, like so: {{Demythification}}

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DAN004
Medium:
12:48:35 AM 26th Apr 2015
Do we have a trope for
  1. A child who doesn't know that he's adopted, or his parents aren't his real parents?
  2. Said foster parents trying to keep the secret about his real parents to the child?
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Chabal2
12:48:35 AM 26th Apr 2015

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LavaSkies
Medium:
06:46:31 PM 25th Apr 2015
edited by LavaSkies
What is the YMMV about when one subconsciously makes up "facts" about the work-effectively an unintentional fan theory? For example, someone gets it in their head that Alice and Bob used to date some time ago due to their behavior towards each other but they really only met recently.
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Bisected8
02:57:41 PM 25th Apr 2015
LavaSkies
03:08:33 PM 25th Apr 2015
Close, but Fanon is more widely shared. This is just when people unintentionally and erroneously assume that something is so.
DAN004
04:02:46 PM 25th Apr 2015
Gideoncrawle
06:46:31 PM 25th Apr 2015
You might also be looking for Fan Wank and/or Epileptic Trees.

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SolipSchism
Medium:
03:49:32 PM 25th Apr 2015
edited by SolipSchism
Do we have a trope describing the tendency for some shows, mostly anime, and mostly comedy, to periodically cut away to a brief and very tranquil shot? It's not Relax-o-Vision, which is used to cover up (or parody covering up) something inappropriate or violent, and it's not We Are Experiencing Technical Difficulties, which is used for similar purposes; this is typically used to punctuate a joke or serve as a segue between scenes.

The anime of Nichijou uses this a lot; right after a joke, or between sketches, the camera will cut to a tranquil area in the city for a few seconds. You might see somebody casually walking past, and occasionally there will be a very mild in-joke; one episode, for instance, had a sketch that ended with a character deciding to go to the store, and one of these cuts later showed her walking through the frame with a shopping bag. In Nichijou in particular, each episode will have a different location that it uses, but it will use the same location for the whole episode.

I might not be explaining this very well. Feel free to ask clarifying questions if this is confusing. I'm thinking something like Tranquil Cutaway if it's not already a trope (and if there are more examples).

Edit: I haven't seen it in Nichijou (yet; I'm only a few episodes in), but The Thing That Goes Doink often features in this type of cutaway.
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DAN004
05:06:22 PM 24th Apr 2015
Try looking @ Cut to the Index
DAN004
05:08:01 PM 24th Apr 2015
And I just found Blade-of-Grass Cut.
SolipSchism
03:49:32 PM 25th Apr 2015
edited by SolipSchism
Hm. I wonder. That looks pretty close, but there's a surprising lack of anime examples.

The description isn't super clear, but seems to imply that this is a shot that occurs during a scene, i.e., you can still hear whatever is going on, but the camera focuses on something apparently unrelated. What I'm thinking of is similar, except that it's usually not close-up on anything in particular, but rather a wide shot of a place in the city or a landscape, and also that it's something used as a beat in a scene or a transition between scenes, so it's virtually always silent or nothing but ambient noise, no dialogue. It's definitely not just a camera trick in the middle of a scene when the dialogue keeps going; this cuts away from the scene entirely.

It's a little vague, though, and it might be flexible enough. Would like to see some other opinions first. Thanks!

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H-Z
Medium:
02:24:15 PM 25th Apr 2015
Do we have a trope for when someone walks into a nasty situation, be it a brawl, monster, or just something plain weird, only to do a 180 degree turn and walk back out again?
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Freezer
07:20:31 AM 25th Apr 2015
H-Z
10:19:10 AM 25th Apr 2015
Naw, its usually done immediately upon entering for comic effect and it has nothing to do with henchmen deserting.
Scorpion451
10:41:50 AM 25th Apr 2015
edited by Scorpion451
Tropes Are Flexible- any trope can be Played for Laughs. Screw This, I'm Outta Here! can also apply to anyone who does it, not just henchmen. Even the hero can pull a Screw This, I'm Outta Here!.

That said, could also be Know When to Fold 'Em.
rodneyAnonymous
02:24:15 PM 25th Apr 2015
Stealth Hi/Bye may be related.

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Lyendith
Medium:
01:49:52 PM 25th Apr 2015
Is there a trope for stories that are about author/filmmaker/artist wannabes trying to get their work published, the world of edition, and such?
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Micah
01:49:51 PM 25th Apr 2015

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PistolsAtDawn
Medium:
12:56:39 PM 25th Apr 2015
Do we have a trope for First Kill?

We have It Gets Easier and It Never Gets Any Easier, but those are about the reaction to killing, not the kill itself, and Gaining The Will To Kill, but that seems to be more about a characters willingness to kill in general than their actual first kill.
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SolipSchism
12:42:30 PM 24th Apr 2015
edited by SolipSchism
Unless there's deeper meaning or context for it, it's Chairs.

Some people kill people. And logically, barring some timey-wimey shenanigans, every person who has killed people must, at some point, have made their first kill.

There needs to be something deeper than the chronological happenstance of an event for it to be a trope.

Edited for grammar.
Chabal2
05:52:04 AM 25th Apr 2015
Some can probably be found under My God, What Have I Done? if it turns out they didn't like it.
Scorpion451
06:21:24 AM 25th Apr 2015
There's also Moral Event Horizon for when this is the point of no return on someone Slowly Slipping Into Evil or a Protagonist Journey to Villain. (I'm wondering if you might not have a certain recent extremely good but spoilerific Gut Punch moment from Gotham in mind...)
Gideoncrawle
12:56:39 PM 25th Apr 2015
Depending on the circumstances and the killer's culture, there could also be a Rite of Passage or Start of Darkness involved. But yeah, any trope applicability will probably depend more on the circumstances surrounding the kill than on the kill itself.

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Chabal2
Medium:
06:07:24 AM 25th Apr 2015
Is there a trope where instead of using a Historical-Domain Character, an author creates a protagonist that's related to the character in some way?

For example, Fujiwara no Mokou and Fujiwara no Sai, both fictional characters who belong to the (historical) Fujiwara clan.

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SolipSchism
02:28:23 PM 22nd Apr 2015
The Fictional Character Non Fictional Relative YKTTW apparently never got off the ground (inactive for over a year and a half now). Nothing stopping anyone from taking it over, though.
jormis29
09:26:28 PM 22nd Apr 2015
DAN004
11:21:43 PM 22nd Apr 2015
^ What the OP asked isn't limited to an ancestor. But it is limited to Real Life ppl.
jormis29
07:21:53 AM 23rd Apr 2015
edited by jormis29
^ Famous Ancestor includes a fictional character being related to Real Life people, just read the page
FurAndStone
07:44:29 AM 23rd Apr 2015
^ OP Doesn't appear to be asking about ancestors though, more like a more contemporary relative. Famous Ancestor is like "My great great great grandfather was Christopher Columbus". This trope would be like "My brother is Christopher Columbus".
Freezer
08:08:15 AM 23rd Apr 2015
There are a few entries of the "famous immediate family" under Famous Ancestor. Barring enough examples for a subtrope, that's still your best bet.
SolipSchism
09:00:13 AM 23rd Apr 2015
^ I'd say those are misuse. As written, the description is explicitly about somebody who has Exactly What It Says on the Tin: A Famous Ancestor. The description doesn't make any allowances for closer relations. A Sub or Sister Trope would be appropriate, though.
Specialist290
10:05:21 PM 23rd Apr 2015
I'd say this would most likely fall under Been There, Shaped History.
SolipSchism
10:34:25 AM 24th Apr 2015
^ What OP is asking has nothing to do with historical events, though. It could overlap, but that's tangential to the question.
Chabal2
06:07:24 AM 25th Apr 2015
All the tropes cited are often seen alongside this one, but the one I'm looking for would basically be "Fictional member of a real-life family". Often seen in historical fiction, since the further back it goes the easier it it to believe.

For example, The Three Musketeers' take on The Man in the Iron Mask is that it was the (real) king Louis XIV's (fictional) twin brother, and in The Count of Monte Cristo, the (real) general Quesnel is given a fictional son so as to provide a You Killed My Father moment (in real life, his death was unsolved).

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Tallens
Medium:
06:07:15 AM 25th Apr 2015
edited by Tallens
Do we have anything for when after some incident the last message found seemingly realated to it is really cryptic? For example, in The Old Republic, a Sith Lord is found dead after going into a dangerous, mysterious area, and the only thing on his datapad is a note that says, "It sees."
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Scorpion451
08:33:58 PM 24th Apr 2015
Tallens
08:50:51 PM 24th Apr 2015
In Apocalyptic Log we get a fairly good idea of the events leading up to tragedy, so not what I was thinking of.

That Was the Last Entry is when a log or journal suddenly stops. Cryptic but not reallywhat I was asking about either
FurAndStone
08:59:24 PM 24th Apr 2015
DAN004
08:59:50 PM 24th Apr 2015
eroock
03:06:41 AM 25th Apr 2015
Also check Vagueness Is Coming.
Scorpion451
06:07:15 AM 25th Apr 2015
^^^^You can have very short apocalyptic logs, especially if its implied that the thing used to have more information on it, but everything but the Last Entry is ruined/torn out/corrupted/erased, or that the only thing of note in it is the last bizarre entry and the rest is left out in accordance with Conservation of Detail. For example, in games like Dead Space and Bio Shock where you find recordings and notes from different people (which can be as short as "It sees"), those are apocalyptic logs.

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Pastykake
Medium:
05:11:00 PM 24th Apr 2015
Is there a trope for when a character considers an idea and finds it so absurd that (s)he bursts out laughing?
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PPPSSC
08:38:11 PM 17th Apr 2015
Pastykake
09:20:55 PM 17th Apr 2015
No, that's laughing along with something to be sarcastic and then basically telling whoever said it to shut up. This is genuine laughter at something so unbelievable it's funny. Contempt vs. amusement.
DAN004
12:05:18 AM 18th Apr 2015
This is very common, though I haven't found it yet.
SetsunasaNiWa
08:28:03 AM 18th Apr 2015
Wouldn't it risk being a variant of PSOC? People Are Laughing At Absurd Things They Find Funny.
Pastykake
02:19:04 PM 18th Apr 2015
I'm thinking of a specific situation: Alice suggests a premise to Bob ("Maybe he'll win," 'he' being an incredibly wimpy person going to fight a very strong opponent, or "What if we have Carol sneak past everyone and complete the Stealth-Based Mission," where Carol is notoriously clumsy and/or otherwise unstealthy) and they briefly ponder such a thing happening, or else Bob is thinking alone and considers it by himself. Seriously imagining the premise causes them/him to burst out laughing.

It's not just "I find X both funny and absurd," it's "I tried and failed to imagine X being possible, and the absurdity of it is too great to consider it without laughing."
Pastykake
05:50:12 PM 18th Apr 2015
On the PSoC front, it goes toward characterization of the one being talked about. It says something about Carol that Bob (or Bob and Alice) try but can't take seriously the idea of Carol doing X or of X happening.
SetsunasaNiWa
03:40:31 AM 19th Apr 2015
It could go to characterization of just the one being laughed at, but only if the one laughing were unbiased. I reckon to establish unbiased characters is hell of a hard job for a writer.

In all other cases it's going to be a mixture of characterizations at best.

Opposite train of thought: "you're laughing there, you must be an idiot." Reminds me (not saying that it fits perfectly) of Noblewoman's Laugh.

Also, how to establish the laugh being brought on by exactly thinking of someone else's inability to complete a task? Inner Monologue or lampshade by the same character every single time? Without some substance, laughs could be attributed to a mean habit or bluffs.
DAN004
04:39:06 AM 19th Apr 2015
I believe this trope gives the idea of either 1) how absurd the situation is, and/or 2) what can be said about the guy who laughed it off because he thinks it's absurd.
SetsunasaNiWa
05:00:39 AM 19th Apr 2015
Like, to establish an idea as absurd, have someone neutral laugh at it on-screen?
Specialist290
12:31:46 PM 20th Apr 2015
edited by Specialist290
Closest fit to me seems to be My God, You Are Serious, though I can't really think of anything for the self-inflicted version.

Alternately, it could just be the laughter is working as a way to lampshade the fact that the plan itself is a Zany Scheme.
Chariset
09:44:28 AM 24th Apr 2015
DAN004
05:11:00 PM 24th Apr 2015
^ close.

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Spinosegnosaurus77
Medium:
05:09:07 PM 24th Apr 2015
Do we have a trope like Astral Finale, but with gothic horror instead of outer space?
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Scorpion451
07:04:28 AM 24th Apr 2015
edited by Scorpion451
Well, that depends on what you mean. In the most general sense there's:
  • Genre Shift: "and suddenly this is now a horror story/space western/screwball comedy..." final episode shifts count here, as do ones where the change is permanent (for example, I vaguely remember in the 90's there was a mediocre cop show that Genre Shifted into a moderately good Occult Detective/Creature-Hunter Organization series after its first season)
  • Out-of-Genre Experience if its just for an episode or minor arc in the middle of the series. Many of the Episodes tropes are these in some fashion.

For more specific tropes that this could be, we've got:

Might also make sure you're not thinking of the Cosmic Horror Genre, which is easy to get mixed up with Gothic Horror.
Spinosegnosaurus77
10:31:21 AM 24th Apr 2015
No, this is for when the mood of the story stays the same. It's not cosmic horror, although it may apply to fantasy more generally.
Scorpion451
01:13:27 PM 24th Apr 2015
edited by Scorpion451
I don't see what you're asking then, if nothing changes.

If you mean you have an astral finale in a gothic horror work, thats still astral finale. If you mean that a work suddenly develops Gothic Horror elements, then its a Genre Shift. The mood of the work doesn't have to change, just the genre.
DAN004
05:09:07 PM 24th Apr 2015
Maybe he meant "Gothic Finale"

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MorningStar1337
Medium:
04:09:44 PM 24th Apr 2015
Is this Too Rare to Trope? because I want to know is there are other examples of this concept besides Tales of Xillia 2:

  • A supercomputer that houses the digitized consciousness and acts as a Soul Jar or a Mind Hive supercomputer. Think The Matrix, but with the bodies dematerialized
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jormis29
11:13:22 PM 23rd Apr 2015
MorningStar1337
11:27:28 PM 23rd Apr 2015
edited by MorningStar1337
That might be related, but unless this extends to floating screens, I don't think it counts and I think the trope you mentioned refers to singular beings as opposed to a congregation of the minds/souls/consciousness of multiple beings (there's a reason Mind Hive was linked in the OP. That said the difference from that trope is that the "body" is a supercomputer)
eroock
10:07:28 AM 24th Apr 2015
SolipSchism
10:30:35 AM 24th Apr 2015
edited by SolipSchism
^ Do you mean a supercomputer that uses Uploaded Brains for processing power, or just a Matrix that doesn't bother to keep the bodies around? Does it matter whether the individual minds themselves are having a conscious experience?
MorningStar1337
01:23:19 PM 24th Apr 2015
edited by MorningStar1337
just a Matrix that doesn't bother to keep the bodies around, more or less (also the example that inspired this query have the denizens of that know that they are in it)
SolipSchism
01:51:53 PM 24th Apr 2015
Hmm. So it's not a Lotus-Eater Machine, then. Is it a Wetware CPU?
MorningStar1337
04:09:44 PM 24th Apr 2015
That might be it, though I don;t think any of the digitized people involved are controlling the ruins. maybe I should had linked a video...

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DAN004
Medium:
01:17:32 PM 24th Apr 2015
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NemuruMaeNi
01:35:25 AM 24th Apr 2015
A shallow drive-by comment: Anthropomorphic Personification looks unhealty. I have doubts it can serve as a supertrope to Moe Anthropomorphism with such description.
Bisected8
02:29:31 AM 24th Apr 2015
  • Allegorical Character is a stand in for a whole group made of multiple people s/he represents.
  • Anthropomorphic Personification is a human(oid) representation of an abstract concept.
  • Abstract Apotheosis is when a character becomes so strongly tied to a concept, they essentially become it on some level, either by literally becoming its AP, or just representing it really well.

Examples:

Side Note: I can't see anything that wrong with Anthropomorphic Personification's page. Could you elaborate, Nemuru?
DAN004
04:03:22 AM 24th Apr 2015
^ They all sound interesting indeed. Thanks, I get it now.
DAN004
04:03:50 AM 24th Apr 2015
^ They all sound interesting indeed. Thanks, I get it now.
Scorpion451
01:17:32 PM 24th Apr 2015
^^Seconding the confusion over the comment on Anthropomorphic Personification

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ProgenyExMachina
Medium:
01:10:03 PM 24th Apr 2015
What's the genre of fiction that explains a real-life phenomenon, like old oral traditions that end with something like "and that's why birds have wings"? I know it has a page here, but I can't think of its name.
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Scorpion451
01:09:24 PM 24th Apr 2015
ProgenyExMachina
01:10:03 PM 24th Apr 2015
Thank you.

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TVsVeryOwn
Medium: Live Action TV
10:35:44 AM 24th Apr 2015
edited by TVsVeryOwn
What's it called when someone uses a commercial kitchen as a mode of egress? It's a staple of spy and police shows and nobody in the kitchen ever gives a fuck. Edit: Kitchen Chase, duh, but I'm thinking of the case where the pursuer isn't right behind. Just the general concept of always being able to leave by the kitchen no matter what. See Blacklist Season 1 Ep. 17.
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SetsunasaNiWa
01:36:33 PM 21st Apr 2015
edited by SetsunasaNiWa
Call it a Downplayed Trope of Kitchen Chase, I'd suggest. >_< (the one leaving first usually isn't shown and/or can be in not that much of hurry)
eroock
12:38:44 PM 22nd Apr 2015
Is a chase through some muggles' living room and out their window also covered by this trope?
Chariset
03:06:08 PM 22nd Apr 2015
Are you looking more for the area in which the action happens or more for the way the ordinary people just ignore it?
DAN004
04:23:27 PM 22nd Apr 2015
^ if it's the latter it's Bystander Syndrome
eroock
11:32:13 AM 23rd Apr 2015
edited by eroock
^^ It's the area. Like this chase scene from Se7en, where the detective chases John Doe through someone's apartment.
SolipSchism
12:35:59 PM 23rd Apr 2015
So a setting trope, essentially? Not really the chase itself, but the fact that kitchens are a disproporitonately common way to get in and out of a building?
eroock
06:37:16 PM 23rd Apr 2015
Whatever trope you recognize in that clip (until the bathroom window).
SolipSchism
10:35:44 AM 24th Apr 2015
Doesn't really help me because I can't visit Youtube at work. Which is pretty much why Weblinks Are Not Examples.

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AHI-3000
Medium:
08:53:07 AM 24th Apr 2015
Is there a trope for how even in works with a historical setting, nobody is shown having tooth decay?
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Jinjer
08:53:07 AM 24th Apr 2015
I got you covered with Eternally Pearly-White Teeth

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DAN004
Medium:
04:38:02 AM 24th Apr 2015
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Freezer
09:10:02 PM 23rd Apr 2015
JoieDeCombat
09:27:45 PM 23rd Apr 2015
After reading the article for Villain Corner I am still honestly not clear on what it's supposed to be. For the other two, however:

Slowly Slipping Into Evil is about a character who starts off with one minor evil act, and subsequently finds it easier and easier to do more and more significantly evil actions. It's about the gradual erosion of their morality. Let's say Alice starts as a virtuous person but in a moment of temptation commits a minor wrongdoing, like a small theft or a lie which benefits her at someone else's expense, and gets away with it. The next time the opportunity comes up, she does something a little worse... and a little worse... and ends up becoming a morally corrupt murderer. That's Slowly Slipping Into Evil.

Jumping Off the Slippery Slope is when the writing sets up a dilemma of Grey and Grey Morality, then ducks out of resolving it by having one side cross the Moral Event Horizon. In this case, Alice starts as a morally ambiguous character who does some sketchy things but has some genuinely valid points about her justification for doing them, and the story intentionally leaves it up in the air whether it's better for the heroes to side with or against her since there are benefits and drawbacks to either option. Later in the storyline, however, Alice suddenly crosses the Moral Event Horizon and starts kicking puppies with abandon even though her behavior is not consistent with the motives and reasoning she expressed before; at this point, the heroes are clearly justified in opposing her and any point she might have been making before she went off the deep end is simply abandoned.

That said, a lot of the examples listed on the Jumping Off the Slippery Slope page only seem to involve an accelerated descent into villainy, so there may be some kind of cleanup required to straighten out these two tropes.

DAN004
11:08:18 PM 23rd Apr 2015
So is JOTSS a Bad Writing trope?

Btw, sorry, moar questions
Freezer
02:49:02 AM 24th Apr 2015
  • Both deal with "each previous act makes the next easier to pull off and/or cope with". SSIE deals more with the progressively worse nature of the acts while IGE deals with the mental toll having to perform such acts takes.
  • Both ostensibly deal with a sudden shift to/escalation of evil. Bait the Dog would be more akin to a Bait and Switch version of Villain Corner ("You like the new guy? Too bad he's evil.") JOTSS is jumping from Evil Act A (a murder) straight to Evil Act Z (All The Murders).

Freezer
02:51:53 AM 24th Apr 2015
edited by Freezer
And like so many other tropes, JOTSS falls squarely in the realm of Tropes Are Tools. One writer can make it work, while another will make a mess. The sheer number of connected tropes (Then Let Me Be Evil, Evil Feels Good, Who's Laughing Now?, etc) speaks to how it can be made to work.
Freezer
03:04:35 AM 24th Apr 2015
And Another Thing: I think I can illustrate the differences between the three tropes with one character: Anakin Skywalker.

  • Villain Corner: Since we know Anakin becomes Vader, everything Adult!Anakin does - even the clearly-heroic stuff - is touched with darkness.
  • Slowly Slipping Into Evil: We're clearly meant to feel this way, from the moment Anakin slaughters the Sand People. This is meant to be Anakin's Start of Darkness. But since he seems to re-find his center, up until the third act of Revenge Of The Sith, it comes across as...
  • Jumping Off the Slippery Slope: Anakin going from causing Mace Windu's death in a moment of rage, to giving himself completely over to Palpatine and immediately going out to slaughter the Jedi Younglings.
DAN004
04:01:45 AM 24th Apr 2015
^ Perhaps I can understand now, thanks.
JoieDeCombat
04:38:02 AM 24th Apr 2015
The JotSS article specifically centers around the undermining of a previous moral dilemma by the character's leap into evil, not just the sudden leap into evil. A lot of the usage doesn't reflect that, though, so one or the other needs to be rectified.

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DAN004
Medium:
12:54:42 AM 24th Apr 2015
How would Discriminate and Switch and Twofer Token Minority relate to each other?
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Chabal2
12:54:42 AM 24th Apr 2015
The former can apply to the latter ("I don't hate you because you're black, I hate you because you're a woman"), but is far broader in scope.


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Lavaeolus
Medium:
09:47:55 PM 23rd Apr 2015
edited by Lavaeolus
Similar to I Am the Noun and Knight Templar, a character who is so devoted to a cause/idea/group that they are dehumanised to such a degree they're presented as almost an Anthropomorphic Personification for said whatever. I had a look, but I didn't see anything.

My key thought here is Vhailor, in Planescape: Torment. At one point, Vhailor was just a regular man, moreorless, but in his backstory he joins the Mercykillers (a group who believe mercy is a weakness) and becomes utterly devoted to justice. Then, through sheer force of belief in justice, he continues to live on in his armour as a spirit of justice of sorts, all else forgotten after being tricked and trapped away for years left to die. If the player causes him to doubt the concept of justice for even a second he'll suddenly fall into a puff of dust and now-lifeless armour.

More broadly, you could also say Inspector Javert, the antagonist of Les Mis, who everyone sees as just cold, hard law embodied, has the physical appearance of "unyielding, cruel authority", and who occasionally refers to himself in third-person in the musical.

Of course, characters like Javert fit more into Well-Intentioned Extremist and Knight Templar, though you could theoretically have human characters who purely embody "goodness" or so on, and play it straight. Don't know if it's worth making this anything distinct.
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Scorpion451
11:26:29 AM 23rd Apr 2015
There are a lot tropes that deal with different aspects and variants of this idea. Might look at The Fettered, Knight Errant, and Principles Zealot in particular.
DAN004
04:21:20 PM 23rd Apr 2015
JoieDeCombat
09:47:55 PM 23rd Apr 2015
Vhailor sounds like an Abstract Apotheosis.

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Lyner
Medium:
09:17:47 PM 23rd Apr 2015
Is there any sort of trope for characteristics strongly associated with childhood and used to suggest immaturity? I'm asking this after finding that at least one article has used the label "Beauty Mark" to describe what's called a Mongolian Spot. Mongolian Spots are dark, often bluish areas that often appear on Asian children, especially right above the rear, and almost always disappear before they make it into grade school. There have been a number of anime characters revealed to have this "bruise", and it's just about always used as an extremely embarrassing mark that suggests the person's still very immature. The idea of something like this being called a "Beauty Mark" is utterly ridiculous.
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DAN004
04:25:04 PM 23rd Apr 2015
Chariset
09:17:47 PM 23rd Apr 2015
edited by Chariset
I've searched the Immaturity Tropes and Youngsters indexes and I don't see anything about a physical sign of immaturity that the wearer finds embarrassing.

There's Virginity Flag, but that doesn't seem to be quite what you're after.

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Micah
Medium:
09:09:54 PM 23rd Apr 2015
edited by Micah
What's the trope here?

Alice: Bob, I need your help with this thing you would stereotypically be expected to be good at.
Bob: I'm offended that you think I'd be able to help with that, just because of my <ethnicity/occupation/hair color...>. But, as it happens, I actually can.

This Skin Horse strip is a good example. There's also the scene in Slings and Arrows where Anna tries to score some pot off Maria, and Maria rants about people who think stage managers are all pot-smoking lesbians before admitting that she can't help because her guy's out of town until Tuesday.

I thought it was I Resemble That Remark, but it looks like that's something else...
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randomsurfer
08:55:31 PM 23rd Apr 2015
edited by randomsurfer
Micah
09:09:54 PM 23rd Apr 2015
That looks like the one I want. Thanks!

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Jinjer
Medium:
01:32:10 PM 23rd Apr 2015
Is there a trope for a location having a convenient but improbable array of abandoned buildings sitting around? Say, a TV series taking place in a small but lively town which sports the full array of the abandoned mansion, hospital, factory, warehouse, church, asylum, etc. for the Monster of the Week to hide in
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DAN004
09:51:13 AM 23rd Apr 2015
Jinjer
10:03:13 AM 23rd Apr 2015
Not really what I had in mind. I'm thinking of it more as a geographical improbability?
Scorpion451
11:33:16 AM 23rd Apr 2015
This is exactly Geographic Flexibility.
eroock
11:54:11 AM 23rd Apr 2015
Perhaps Never Recycle a Building exaggerated?
Jinjer
01:32:10 PM 23rd Apr 2015
Ah, Geographic Flexibility is what I was looking for. Thank you!

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captainmarkle
Medium:
11:23:17 AM 23rd Apr 2015
A British fascist tries burning a flag, only to end up failing dismally.
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DAN004
07:19:54 AM 23rd Apr 2015
Scorpion451
09:44:27 AM 23rd Apr 2015
edited by Scorpion451
Well, there's always Poke the Poodle and Narm...
captainmarkle
11:08:10 AM 23rd Apr 2015
I really don't think that And Then What? applies, since it was more the guy's failure to set the flag alight, rather than a lack of planning.
SolipSchism
11:12:24 AM 23rd Apr 2015
edited by SolipSchism
^ I think DAN was asking And Then What?, as in, what else? How is failing to set a flag on fire a trope?
Bisected8
11:23:17 AM 23rd Apr 2015
edited by Bisected8

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GrigorII
Medium:
11:10:37 AM 23rd Apr 2015
An inversion of the Just Eat Gilligan trope: according to the show basic premise, a simple and mundane action would not solve all the heroe's problems, but rather screw him for good. Or is it the same trope anyway?
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DAN004
07:21:15 AM 23rd Apr 2015
I'm rather confused with that trope, tbh. Which one is played straight - the fact that ppl don't do the simpler thing because of plot/drama, or when ppl actually do the simpler thing?
Freezer
08:05:42 AM 23rd Apr 2015
edited by Freezer
Replied to the wrong question.
SolipSchism
09:01:32 AM 23rd Apr 2015
I'm not sure there's a trope in "You could fuck everything up just by doing X". Some more explanation of what you're getting at would help, though.
FurAndStone
09:03:51 AM 23rd Apr 2015
^^^ I always thought of it as an Audience Reaction, in which the audience experiences Fridge Logic concerning the premise of a show.

Kayube
09:50:37 AM 23rd Apr 2015
I guess something could be worked out if the emphasis was on "how did they manage to go so long without doing X that would ruin everything?"
Scorpion451
10:58:59 AM 23rd Apr 2015
edited by Scorpion451
I think I see where they're going with this, might be tropable if I'm understanding correctly:
  • If this particular button on the dimension jumping device is ever pushed, the entire Portal Network will disentangle, and Alice will never find home. Alice elects to superglue a cover over said button.
  • Bob is a Lich turned hero, looking to set right his past misdeeds. He is completely paranoid about his glass Soul Jar- needing to be within a mile of it at all times seemed a lot less restrictive before the internal combustion engine. He has occasional nightmares about car thieves with hammers.
  • Specific example: In The Walking Dead, If you get bitten or deeply scratched by a zombie, you either immediately cut off that limb, or you die and become a zombie. No exceptions. Badass characters have died without warning when a lone zombie snuck up on them and bit them once.

Basically, it's sort of like a combination of Weaksauce Weakness and Diabolus Ex Machina. If 'X' (a simple easy-to-do thing), were to happen, it'd be a Sudden Downer Ending (for that character anyway). At least part of the driving force in the story comes from the constant danger of X happening.
SolipSchism
11:10:37 AM 23rd Apr 2015
edited by SolipSchism
^ Ah, or the Soul Gems in Puella Magi Madoka Magica, which are later revealed to contain the actual souls of the girls—which is why they're capable of fighting so hard and so long despite fatigue and injuries; their bodies are now just tools. If the soul gem gets too far away from the body, or is destroyed, the body becomes a vegetable with no animating force. Subverted, I guess, in that this is illustrated when one of the girls does throw her gem away (off an overpass, onto a passing truck that carries it away), not realizing its importance, and her friends have to retrieve it to revive her.

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DAN004
Medium:
10:00:07 AM 23rd Apr 2015
What's the difference of Must Make Amends and The Atoner?
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Jinjer
10:00:07 AM 23rd Apr 2015
Must Make Amends occurs when a Heroic Character makes a mistake they feel the need to rectify. The Atoner is a villain or similar deciding to turn over a new leaf.

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sentairider42
Medium: Live Action TV
09:00:32 AM 23rd Apr 2015
edited by sentairider42
In the Castle episode Death Gone Crazy, Castle and Beckett prove that the culprit is the camera man, and they break his alibi when they see that the camera he used was not moving during the estimated time of death.

Which trope does that alibi fall under?
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sentairider42
10:32:01 AM 22nd Apr 2015
Bump
sentairider42
06:17:44 PM 22nd Apr 2015
Bump
Chariset
08:04:25 PM 22nd Apr 2015
edited by Chariset
sentairider42
08:43:54 AM 23rd Apr 2015
^That applies to how you prove who did it. I'm more looking for the trope that the alibi itself would qualify as.
SolipSchism
08:58:06 AM 23rd Apr 2015
You haven't actually said what the alibi is, only that they disprove it by showing that "the camera wasn't moving".

Was the alibi that he was at work...?
FurAndStone
09:00:32 AM 23rd Apr 2015
edited by FurAndStone

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deepouterspace
Medium: Film
05:39:17 AM 23rd Apr 2015
What is the term for mid-production retconning? Specifically retconning or modification of material that has already been recorded to correct a problem with content/ratings problem (overdubbing, cgi or deletion of an audio/video/plot element)? Maybe something like Content Modification would be appropriate, since CGI makes it possible to change anything?

Example: In the James Bond movie Quantum of Solace, Felix Leiter meets James bond in a bar and orders a cerveza. After the meeting is broken up by the arrival of a black ops team, Felix is seen taking another sip of his beer and contemplating the betrayal of his friend (focusing the audience attention on the beer). On his way through the alley, he hurls the bottle against the alley wall in disgust. You can hear the muffled breaking of the bottle, but the bottle and glass fragments have been digitally scrubbed from the sequence and all that is left is a weird 'aw shux' gesture by Felix.

Explanation?: Perhaps breaking bottles was considered to be less 'green' than was desired. Perhaps it was ad-libbed/second unit and/or someone decided they didn't like it?

Example: Greedo shooting first, Han stepping on CGI Jabba's tail during their encounter at Mos Eisley, etc.

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DAN004
10:50:59 AM 22nd Apr 2015
deepouterspace
04:15:19 PM 22nd Apr 2015
Yes! Maybe a 'green bowdlerization'. Leiter littered first? Bleached Underpants might apply... a little bit of 'No Smoking' mixed in.
Scorpion451
05:39:17 AM 23rd Apr 2015
edited by Scorpion451
I'm wondering if the bottle didn't just bounce off the wall due to not being made of Soft Glass, and they decided it looked silly but otherwise the take was good. (don't try it at home because its not a guaranteed thing, but an empty bottle of the right type can bounce on concrete.)

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randomsurfer
Medium: Film
08:04:51 PM 22nd Apr 2015
edited by randomsurfer
Two queries regarding a scene in Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, where Caractatus Potts inadvertantly joins a performance group singing "Me Old Bamboo."

1. Our Hero is Pushed In Front Of An Audence with a song-and-dance troupe. He's not a singer or dancer. He starts to follow along with the song and dance, usually a beat or two behind everyone else and missing the transitions. But pretty soon, within the course of the song, he's not only on the beat and doing the same dance moves as everyone else, he's (arguably) leading the dance and singing a solo in the song.

Is that Instant Expert? If not, what is it?

2. In the song, all the singers are dressed alike in a uniform of sorts. Potts is wearing the same uniform, but his pants are darker. His costume may be different in other ways too but that's the most obvious.

I think I remember seeing a ykttw with this as an example but I don't remember now.
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randomsurfer
05:54:10 PM 22nd Apr 2015
edited by randomsurfer
23 day bump. Also,

3. none of the buskers bat an eye at the new guy joining in.
DAN004
08:04:51 PM 22nd Apr 2015

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Khantalas
Medium:
04:28:34 PM 22nd Apr 2015
This might be too rare to be tropeworthy (I can only think of two examples off the top of my head), but do we have something that covers using alternate or parallel universes to affect the one the character is in?

The examples I can think of are the rift mages from Dragon Age: Inquisition, and what Rin does during the final showdown of Heaven's Feel in Fate/stay night.
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SolipSchism
09:46:42 AM 17th Apr 2015
I'm not familiar with your examples, and you didn't really explain them, but from the description, I'm reasonably sure The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past does this as well. You can perform actions in either the Light World or the Dark World that will affect the other, such as draining a lake.
Khantalas
10:24:04 AM 17th Apr 2015
No, what I'm referring is a when a character in Dimension X taps into Dimension Y to affect Dimension X without moving to Dimension Y. Rin does so to increase the number of magical energy available to her by stealing energy from other dimensions, and rift mages either utilize to looser gravity of the dream/spirit world, or summon magic meteors from there. Merely traveling between between connected dimensions isn't what I'm thinking of.
SolipSchism
11:26:00 AM 17th Apr 2015
edited by SolipSchism
Well, just traveling wasn't what I was referring to; I was referring to how you can do things in one dimension, which will affect things in the other dimension. Like if I drain a lake in one world, it drains (or maybe fills up, like a see-saw) the same lake in the other dimension. But it seems that's not what you're looking for anyway.

What you're describing doesn't really sound like a trope to me, but I could be wrong.
SetsunasaNiWa
12:27:31 PM 17th Apr 2015
edited by SetsunasaNiWa
Possible example-involving instance in VideoGame.Anachronox has been listed via the facet which accounts for apocalyptic effect the transuniversal influence has there. They probably didn't find such trope either.
randomsurfer
07:28:16 PM 17th Apr 2015
edited by randomsurfer
Scorpion451
06:25:54 AM 19th Apr 2015
edited by Scorpion451
Might have something here for YKTTW (call it Linked Realities or something?), but I think you need to include the jumping back and forth form, too.

This would be closely related to, and often overlap with the Dark World trope, but doesn't necessarily have to- I remember hearing about an JRPG game where a high tech world and an arcadian world were linked like this, and Piers Anthony's Apprentice Adept series has Proton (high tech space opera type world) and Phaze (Medieval Stasis and magic realm).

Also pops up in Metroid Prime: Echoes with Light Aether and Dark Aether- Aether used to be one world, but its been split into two half-realities by a phlebotinum meteorite- with only single world's worth of energy between them. A lot of the games mechanics involve jumping back and forth between the two to affect one realm by changing something in the other.

The tropable thing I at least see here is that idea of two worlds sharing one-and-a-half realities, or being made to overlap like that.

Khantalas
11:46:13 PM 21st Apr 2015
Expendable Alternate Universe is a possible consequence, but not necessarily an essential one, since in the Dragon Age example, the Fade is not at all considered expendable.
SolipSchism
12:30:47 PM 22nd Apr 2015
edited by SolipSchism
There's also the time-travel variant, which is obviously a one-way effect: You change things in the past and then jump to the future to enjoy the effect. Sounds like simple cause-and-effect but has been used in Dual-World Gameplay in some of the Zelda games (specifically Ages, in which the Dual-World Gameplay is split between a past and present world, and Ocarina of Time, which is split between a time period when Link was young and one 7 years later), and I think it also came up in Chrono Trigger, though I'm not sure about that one.
DAN004
04:28:34 PM 22nd Apr 2015
  • Mega Man Zero 3: The Cyber Elves (small Energy Beings made of energy and programming) takes their power from Cyberspace, some kind of parallel realm that is only accessible in this game because of Omega's effect. When you enter this realm, all of your Cyber Elves in your possession (safe for certain ones) will be active, granting you many bonus at once.

Would that count there?

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Chariset
Medium:
03:07:59 PM 22nd Apr 2015
edited by Chariset
Is there a trope for characters held unconscious (or dead things kept preserved) in transparent, liquid-filled cylinders?

Edit: Wait, never mind. It's People Jars
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