Lost And Found - TV Tropes

Lost And Found

You've got this trope sticking in your mind. You can remember the general idea, and maybe an example or two, but you'll be damned if you can remember what the thing's called, and the search function turns up nothing relevant. Ask about it here.
Show only:
Add A New Query

StarTropes
Medium:
03:16:37 AM 5th Mar 2015
edited by StarTropes
After looking at Dry Docking and Dry Docked Ship, which are both Shipping Tropes, I started wondering: is there a trope for an actual ship in an actual drydock facility for construction/repairs/upgrades? (This can be a Cool Boat or a Cool Starship.)
see/hide 0 replies  

close replies  

WithFlowers
Medium:
01:12:51 AM 5th Mar 2015
I'm trying to find the trope for "mad scientist loses loved one and builds thing to save them". Right now I'm thinking of time machines specifically ("after his true love dies in a car accident, he builds a time machine to travel back in time and save her!"), but I think the trope covered any method of saving them - alternate universe things, etc.
see/hide 8 replies  
SolipSchism
02:53:33 PM 4th Mar 2015
edited by SolipSchism
Depending on how broad this is, it would also cover (massive spoilers for Tales of Symphonia, will implement appropriate spoiler-tags if it becomes a proper example somewhere):

The Big Bad of Tales of Symphonia is Yggdrasil, also known as Mithos, the hero who ended the Great War that more or less marks the beginning of recorded history. At the end of the War, his sister, Martel, kind-of-sort-of coma-died due to becoming an angel—Trust me, It Makes Sense in Context. So, as any doting brother would do, he split the world in two, seeded a Path of Inspiration on both worlds using Martel as God, and kept her on magic life-support for the next few thousand years while he tried to find just the right body for her soul to possess. The kicker? When he finally brings her back after thousands of years of laboring on her behalf, her first words are to call him out for all the evil he's inflicted on the world, in a massive What the Hell, Hero?
DAN004
03:09:32 PM 4th Mar 2015
Recently launched Seeks Another's Resurrection
eroock
03:20:31 PM 4th Mar 2015
^ How come I don't remember this from YKTTW? Was it under another name?
SolipSchism
03:23:45 PM 4th Mar 2015
^^ Ah, yep, and Tales of Symphonia is already there... twice. Editing.
eroock
03:40:12 PM 4th Mar 2015
Shouldn't this trope mention The Time Machine as a prime example? I guess that's the work the OP was referring to.
SolipSchism
04:12:21 PM 4th Mar 2015
edited by SolipSchism
^ Have you actually read The Time Machine? Unless I'm very badly mistaken, the protagonist is just a scientist who builds a time machine and goes on an adventure For Science!.

He travels forward in time (not back), far beyond the scope of his own civilization's lifetime, loses the machine, goes on an adventure, gets the machine back, comes home, tells his story to a bunch of his socialite friends.

I'm almost certain there's no resurrection/life-saving/past-changing whatsoever.

...A propos of nothing, the fact that there is a time machine is almost totally irrelevant to the plot. It could just as easily have been a TARDIS that dropped him on another planet, for exactly the same adventure.
WithFlowers
04:39:38 PM 4th Mar 2015
DAN 004: Yes, that's it! Thank you!
eroock
01:12:51 AM 5th Mar 2015
edited by eroock
^^ It's the premise of the movie version. I thought they did a close adaptation, but apparently I am mistaken.

close replies  

PinkCelebi
Medium:
01:09:54 AM 5th Mar 2015
edited by PinkCelebi
A more or less plot-relevant character that is introduced whatever far into the story has actually cameo'd earlier, but they were either really out of focus (like most of their body/whatever was out of screen so noticing would take attention to details or they were hidden somewhere in background) or they were given attention equal to generic character, that not many would remember that.

An example is Blendin Blandin from Gravity Falls, who appears in earlier episodes because of his episode's context.
see/hide 11 replies  
FurAndStone
07:45:32 AM 2nd Mar 2015
Daefaroth
11:10:26 AM 2nd Mar 2015
Not knowing the context of that character or show:

Ascended Extra or A Day in the Limelight could also be related.
PinkCelebi
07:40:30 AM 3rd Mar 2015
edited by PinkCelebi
To explain - he's a time traveler that has to fix mess. By appearing in periods from earlier episodes. He actually appears in these episodes before that, so there's no Retcon.
eroock
07:49:53 AM 3rd Mar 2015
edited by eroock
I'd say, it's a case of Chekhov's Gunman. How does this and Early-Bird Cameo compare?
Scorpion451
11:09:02 AM 4th Mar 2015
edited by Scorpion451
Chekhov's Gunman is a character who shows up just long and often enough to be vaguely memorable if you're paying attention. At some point, however, usually late in the story, they are suddenly revealed to be key in a plot twist that in retrospect had likely been planned from the first time they showed up.

Early-Bird Cameo: Remember that really rude shop keeper who was overcharging for everything in the third town? The one that had a unique name instead of being called Shopkeeper like the rest?. Yeah, he's going to be joining your party a few plot points from now after his shop gets burned down by an angry mob, and you'll learn all about his backstory then. (Turns out owing a demonic loan shark a literal ton of gold makes a guy desperate)

SolipSchism
11:36:19 AM 4th Mar 2015
edited by SolipSchism
^ To elaborate, I think the main difference is that a Chekhov's Gunman is an actual type of Chekhov's Gun. An oft-forgotten aspect of the Chekhov's Gun is that it is given some focus or prominent placement when it first appears. If it's just there, it's not actually an example.

So the key phrase in Scorpion's post is the "just long and often enough to be vaguely memorable if you're paying attention". If they just happen to be there but seem like a totally irrelevant set piece, it's an Early-Bird Cameo.

Edit: Oh, also, a big part of Chekhov's Gun is that it becomes relevant at the end, or at least at the end of an arc or episode. So a character who briefly appears in the second town and then joins your party two towns later, and travels with you for the next 100 hours of gameplay, probably is not a Chekhov's Gunman; they are an Early-Bird Cameo.
eroock
11:55:45 AM 4th Mar 2015
^ That makes sense. Too bad, the contrast is not made clear in the descriptions.

^^ According to SolipSchism, "the rude shop keeper who was overcharging for everything in the third town" would be Chekhov's Gunman because he wasn't just a blink-and-miss character the first time around.
SolipSchism
03:32:06 PM 4th Mar 2015
^ Not quite what I was getting at—he is present for the majority of the story and is a main character. I think that would disqualify him.

Check the Laconics of both pages as well. Too often I feel like people just don't read the Laconic, even though putting two Laconics next to each other almost always makes the difference very obvious.
eroock
03:37:10 PM 4th Mar 2015
edited by eroock
Hmmm, the laconic for Early-Bird Cameo speaks of a somewhat different trope than discussed here.
Scorpion451
05:07:24 PM 4th Mar 2015
edited by Scorpion451
^^I typically ignore the laconic, they frequently don't do a very good job of describing the trope, case in point on Early-Bird Cameo. What that laconic is describing is Adaptation Decay in the first part, and a Mythology Gag, Recurring Element, or Production Foreshadowing in the second. Neither of which is actually an early bird cameo.

A much better way to get a handle on a trope, though not all tropes have them, is the Playing With Page, because it walks you through many of the different variations of the trope.
eroock
01:09:54 AM 5th Mar 2015
^ I don't understand how Playing With would help you with Early-Bird Cameo.

close replies  

CompletelyDifferent
Medium:
01:07:13 AM 5th Mar 2015
Do we have that trope where a character explains that true bravery isn't a lack of fear, but doing something despite being afraid? I checked the bravery tropes, but nothing quite seemed to fit.
see/hide 2 replies  
DAN004
10:03:08 PM 4th Mar 2015
eroock
01:07:13 AM 5th Mar 2015
edited by eroock
Sounds like An Aesop. Couldn't find anything related on Stock Aesops though.

close replies  

Chabal2
Medium:
12:59:46 AM 5th Mar 2015
Is there a non-good and evil version of Evil Cannot Comprehend Good? Sort of like an in-verse Blue and Orange Morality, except that both blue and orange are understood by the audience but not the cast.

It's mostly a comedy trope, where some people are so set in their ways they simply cannot understand what the other person is saying. For example, Discworld has a scene where travelling librarians are trapped in the snow with no wood to burn. After the rescue, someone asks why they didn't use the books for fuel, and just gets blank stares as they try to process the idea and fail.

In less comedic versions, someone who has a legitimate grievance due to earlier experience (Does Not Like Men, Abusive Parents...) cannot conceive that anyone could think different. In Ooku for example, one shogun was repeatedly raped when she was younger, and the experience is so traumatic she decrees that her heirs' suitors will be executed for their crime (even though it goes a lot better for the heirs).
see/hide 2 replies  
FurAndStone
12:37:01 AM 5th Mar 2015
The traveling librarians seem to simply be suffering from Skewed Priorities.
eroock
12:59:46 AM 5th Mar 2015

close replies  

sigh824
Medium:
11:39:06 PM 4th Mar 2015
Do we have a trope for Rival duets? Like, "Anything You Can Do" and "What Is This Feeling?" from Wicked?
see/hide 1 replies  
Synchronicity
11:39:06 PM 4th Mar 2015

close replies  

comicwriter
Medium:
11:37:51 PM 4th Mar 2015
Two seperate but similar questions. Do we have tropes for:

When a romantic relationship or pairing that wasn't in the original work is featured in an adaptation.

And

When two characters who were unrelated in the original work are relatives in an adaptation?
see/hide 2 replies  
DAN004
10:04:57 PM 4th Mar 2015
edited by DAN004
Synchronicity
11:37:51 PM 4th Mar 2015

close replies  

+loveXu
Medium:
11:37:39 PM 4th Mar 2015
Is there a trope where a mostly straight forward series gets deranged and/or really meta?
see/hide 1 replies  
Micah
11:37:39 PM 4th Mar 2015

close replies  

sigh824
Medium:
07:43:42 PM 4th Mar 2015
Do we have a trope for Rival duets? Like, "Anything You Can Do" and "What Is This Feeling?" from Wicked?
see/hide 1 replies  
sigh824
07:43:42 PM 4th Mar 2015
GAH! Double post, damn.

close replies  

StarTropes
Medium:
05:04:29 PM 4th Mar 2015
I'm looking for a trope for when Alice is on the verge of winning, but gets cocky and screws up, allowing Bob to claim a surprise victory.
see/hide 10 replies  
DAN004
02:52:18 PM 3rd Mar 2015
So it's like the Tortoise and the Hare story?
Bisected8
03:11:03 PM 3rd Mar 2015
edited by Bisected8
StarTropes
04:37:51 PM 3rd Mar 2015
edited by StarTropes
Not quite that, since that refers to a proud character getting knocked down early and having to learn how to deal with it. Not a requirement for what I'm talking about.
DAN004
05:35:41 PM 3rd Mar 2015
^ are you referring to me or Bisected8?
StarTropes
04:35:16 AM 4th Mar 2015
I'm referring to Pride Before a Fall. That's not what I'm looking for.

Say Alice and Bob are in a race. Alice has a fair lead going into the home stretch, and starts celebrating her victory before she's crossed the finish line. Bob then puts on a burst of speed that lets him pass Alice in time to win; thus, Alice loses because she assumed she had won before the race was actually over.
DAN004
04:55:47 AM 4th Mar 2015
Yeah, totally Tortoise and the Hare.
randomsurfer
08:30:13 AM 4th Mar 2015
There's Assumed Win (which the Tortoise & Hare aren't mentioned on for some reason).
StarTropes
03:58:44 PM 4th Mar 2015
That one kinda works, if it includes the almost-winner losing after screwing up his/her own victory. Like the Tortoise and the Hare.
SolipSchism
04:09:13 PM 4th Mar 2015
Odd, but Assumed Win seems to be for situations when the winner is, in fact, already decided, and Alice stands up/thanks the crowd/gives a speech/whatever, only to be disappointed when she finds out that Bob actually won.

We're looking more for "The challenge is not over, but Alice thinks she's too far ahead to lose, and ends up losing because she got lazy/overconfident/etc."
DAN004
05:04:29 PM 4th Mar 2015
Deconstructed Pri De

close replies  

eroock
Medium:
03:28:34 PM 4th Mar 2015
edited by eroock
Can Merritt McKinney be considered an Alliterative Name?
see/hide 1 replies  
SolipSchism
03:28:34 PM 4th Mar 2015
There's no "considering" about it—yep, both names start with the same letter, or more accurately, the same consonant sound, so it's alliterative.

close replies  

Aszur
Medium:
01:13:52 PM 4th Mar 2015
Is there a trope for when characters that are "gross" or "weird" or otherwise just plain "off" in some way or another are shown to blink with their eyes at different speeds from each other? Seen it a lot on more modern catoons and stuff when they are just stupid in one way or another or slimy. Accompanied often by that "squelchy" noise sound
see/hide 2 replies  
Scorpion451
11:38:59 AM 4th Mar 2015
edited by Scorpion451
Aszur
01:13:52 PM 4th Mar 2015
Mmm...I do not think they fit. I have seen it work in tandem with the Gross-Up Close-Up, but it is different in itself.

One expresses anger or impatience, the other confusion, the other anger or madness and the others are "scary shocks", but the one I say is to just make the character look stupid, or unclean. I think I can get an example in video later, but I remember for example Toots from Drawn Together doing it

close replies  

eroock
Medium:
12:00:32 PM 4th Mar 2015
edited by eroock
When a well-known talk show host like Conan O'Brien appear as part of a news report in a movie, commenting on some plot-relevant incident or interviews a character to make the story feel more embedded in real life? Is this As Himself?
see/hide 2 replies  
Scorpion451
07:09:05 PM 3rd Mar 2015
Thats a Leno Device
eroock
12:00:32 PM 4th Mar 2015
thx

close replies  

Lyner
Medium:
10:30:25 AM 4th Mar 2015
I've been wondering if there's a trope for a special kind of "distress", where the distressed individual continues to show defiance in the face of their own powerlessness. The individual is still "in distress", with no hope unless someone saves them, but they still have the will to stare down the enemy. They may be beaten, humiliated, defiled and completely immobilized, but they never break their gaze, defiantly refusing to break no matter what's thrown at them. This is a rather special situation since it remains technically "distress" since the character is clearly demonstrated to have absolutely no hope of freeing him/herself, and must be rescued, but when done well one of the biggest impressions left is still the fierce unyielding strength of the character's spirit.
see/hide 17 replies  
SolipSchism
11:08:17 AM 27th Feb 2015
edited by SolipSchism
I think we have Face Death with Dignity. Hopefully that's a Blue Link.

Edit: Yep. And there's also Defiant to the End, which might be closer to what you want.

Serial Tweak: And I just noticed Defiant Captive.

Even more tweaking: Wait, I don't see the difference between Defiant to the End and Defiant Captive.
DAN004
11:50:42 AM 27th Feb 2015
Defiant to the End doesn't need a capture scenario.
SolipSchism
01:01:12 PM 27th Feb 2015
So why is the first sentence "Someone has been captured and incapacitated," and the Laconic is "A merciless villain gets no respect from a captive"?
eroock
02:33:17 PM 27th Feb 2015
edited by eroock
First time I hear of Defiant Captive. In light of that, I would say Defiant to the End should downplay the capture scenario and focus on cases where death is immanent. Couple of examples would have to be moved over to Defiant Captive. TSR?
SolipSchism
03:41:35 PM 27th Feb 2015
edited by SolipSchism
Honestly, I don't see a significant enough distinction to necessitate having two separate tropes in the first place.

Whether or not the character is actually a captive or prisoner, the trope is that you have a character with power over the other, and the underdog refuses to submit or capitulate, spitting in the face of danger for as long as they're capable.

Does it really matter whether they are a captive or prisoner?

Edit: Although, I could see the above description being separate from a situation in which this character dies, because 99% of the time, the Defiant Captive gets rescued. Defiant to the End could be repurposed to a character who is literally Defiant to the End.
eroock
11:13:57 AM 28th Feb 2015
edited by eroock
I always considered end to mean death. If I understand both tropes correctly, the atmosphere is in fact different for when
(a) a warrior is lying in his blood, but pushes himself to get up again and fight some more against the overwhelming enemy forces, knowing it will only be a matter of time until it's over for him, and
(b) a stubborn princess who spits in the face of the warden.

Sometimes in case (a) the character gets saved by the cavalry but it doesn't change the fact that he was playing for keeps from the get-go. If this is indeed the qualifier for Defiant to the End, some of the examples are not places correctly.
SolipSchism
11:29:50 AM 2nd Mar 2015
^ tbh, your first cited example sounds more like The Determinator to me. The latter sounds like, well, either of these two nearly-identical defiance tropes.
DAN004
03:30:17 PM 2nd Mar 2015
Determinator doesn't specify "end".
SolipSchism
03:44:00 PM 2nd Mar 2015
edited by SolipSchism
I didn't say it does. I'm saying the whole situation they described sounds more like The Determinator to me than either of the Defiant tropes.
eroock
03:07:47 AM 3rd Mar 2015
The description for Defiant to the End actually emphasizes insulting the captor as the key element of the trope. In light of that, I would actually prefer to merge it with Defiant Captive.
DAN004
04:29:30 AM 3rd Mar 2015
^ nah, the distinction is clear: DTTE is when the character dies at the end, and doesn't necessitate captive situation.

Perhaps it's TRS time?
Scorpion451
05:46:59 AM 3rd Mar 2015
edited by Scorpion451
The two tropes are largely unrelated, not sure what the confusion for everyone is, aside from that Example As Thesis at the opening of Defiant to the End that needs to be cut or moved to Defiant Captive where it belongs.

Defiant to the End is for characters who refuse to break. They simply will never, ever, give up or surrender. Death is by no means a requirement, only a demonstrated willingness to die rather than admit defeat, and being captured definitely not required. A character who is Defiant To The End feels that if they are probably going to die anyway, they want to die flipping off cthulhu rather than on their knees begging for mercy. This makes these characters very prone to a Dying Moment of Awesome. The distinction from The Determinator is that they are not invincible, or necessarily even badass- they just won't back down, even against obvious defeat. Very common trait of a Knight in Sour Armor, and in Punk Punk, this is what The Paragon looks like.

Defiant Captive is for characters who are captured but refuse to quit fighting, and pass the time with hobbies like making their captors' lives as miserable as possible, coming up with creative insults, and trying to escape.
DAN004
06:32:15 AM 3rd Mar 2015
If death isn't a requirement then it's Not Afraid to Die
Scorpion451
09:22:50 AM 3rd Mar 2015
edited by Scorpion451
Oh, they can be terrified to die. Its just that the idea of giving up disgusts them more than dying scares them.

To me, one of the best examples of Defiant to the End is this picture. Accounts disagree on whether he was shot or another protestor dragged him away, but they all agree that he fully intended to stand there until that tank ran him over, and that only outside intervention stopped exactly that from happening.

I think the core flaw in the trope's current description is that its trying to describe it as an event or a plot. when this is really a character trait that usually only reveals itself at the Despair Event Horizon or the moment of death.

Its a bit similar to Honor Before Reason and Face Death with Dignity, but the character who is defiant to the end often couldn't care less about honor and dignity. Maybe the Token Evil Teammate gets his dying redemption with a snarky grin and upraised middle fingers as they let that Superpower Meltdown they've been holding back hit critical mass in the middle of the Evil Overlord's citadel. Maybe The Cynic just realized what they are in the dark of the Despair Event Horizon, and how badly the idea of that Smug Snake succeeding actually pisses them off. Maybe its the grizzled Old Soldier making a futile Last Stand streaming profanity and Berserker Tears as one last f-you to his foes. Maybe its the hero finding the Heroic Resolve to get up again and again, even after he knows without question he's going to lose the fight, and that the villain wants him alive so it would be easier and less painful to just give up and go quietly. The reasons don't matter, and how it ends doesn't matter. What matters is that given the choice between accepting defeat or fighting on past any hope of victory, they choose to fight. That's why this frequently overlaps with Senseless Sacrifice, Heroic Sacrifice, Not Too Dead to Save the Day, Inspirational Martyr, Doomed Moral Victor, Martyr Without a Cause, Taking You with Me, Do Not Go Gentle, and Dying Moment of Awesome. In the best case scenario that doesn't involve a Deus ex Machina, this can make the other guy's victory a Pyrrhic one

Polar opposite of Better to Die Than Be Killed.
DAN004
03:03:00 PM 3rd Mar 2015
So, TRS? Or shall I edit it myself?
Chariset
08:37:33 PM 3rd Mar 2015
Scorpion451
10:30:25 AM 4th Mar 2015
^thats a character that is extremely good at intimidation

close replies  

SolipSchism
Medium:
10:24:44 AM 4th Mar 2015
edited by SolipSchism
So I see Portal Network, which requires preestablished points to allow teleportation between its various locations (be it technology or something else, the point is that it's tied to the places from which teleportation is possible).

I also see Flash Step, which isn't actually teleportation.

Do we have a trope for Short Range Teleportation? The most common variant (generally more on the fantasy end of the spectrum instead of sci-fi) is when a character can only teleport within line of sight, so to teleport around the world, they need to do it in a series of "jumps".

I've combed through Teleportation Tropes but I'm not finding it.
see/hide 8 replies  
DAN004
02:48:04 PM 3rd Mar 2015
I simply use Teleporters and Transporters for it.
SolipSchism
03:05:24 PM 3rd Mar 2015
I'm aware that we have a blanket trope for teleportation, but I'm looking for a specific subtrope that requires long journeys to be completed in short segments due to the limitations of the power or technology. I can think of a few examples off the top of my head, and I know there are more:

  • It's not explored in-depth in Battlestar Galactica (Reimagined), but long-distance journeys using Faster-Than-Light Travel must be completed in multiple segments due to some limitation of the technology; ships cannot simply jump across the galaxy in one leap.
  • In Vernor Vinge's The Witling, the psychic Azhiri can only transport short distances due to a surprisingly sound reason that has to do with relative rotational velocity of different points on a planet's surface (namely, the departure point and the destination point), so long journeys are done with a series of short jumps.

Basically this trope would be "A long journey is completed using a series of short-range teleportation jumps."
DAN004
05:39:55 PM 3rd Mar 2015
Wha would this be, then?

  • El Sword: Aisha's Teleport skill teleports her a mid-range distance forward.
FuzzyWulfe
08:55:09 PM 3rd Mar 2015
X-Men's Nightcrawler has had to travel long distances quickly on several occasions and in different incarnations. He does this by teleporting over and over in rapid succession similar to how he does Teleport Spam but in a straight line. He also had a weakness of needing to see where he was going, but that turned out to be more of a mental block.
SolipSchism
08:54:00 AM 4th Mar 2015
edited by SolipSchism
^ You've got the right idea—that's exactly this trope. This wouldn't be a good title, but Teleport Spam In A Straight Line pretty much sums it up.

I should have explicitly mentioned this earlier but (despite my shitty Red Link title in the OP) this is not just Short Range Teleportation, it's Long Range Teleportation Via A Series Of Short Jumps.

A character who can only teleport short distances doesn't qualify unless they're shown or implied to use that teleportation in rapid succession to travel long distances.

And "short" and "long" here are relative. If I can only teleport twenty feet at a time but I can do it 500 times in a row to travel cross-country in a few minutes, that's an example; if I can only teleport a few lightyears at a time but I can do it 500 times in a row to travel between star systems, that's also an example. What's not an example is if I can only teleport a mile at a time, but I only ever use it to go directly from Point A to Point B within the confines of a city, and only ever a single jump at a time.

In other words, the limitations of the ability are not as important as how it's used.

Edit: Also, I think I remembered the explanation from Battlestar Galactica: Their technology is capable of jumping longer distances, but due to the immense distances involved, they have to limit the length of their jumps in order to ensure that the fleet stays together, since jumping too far with a slight difference in their direction of travel could leave them separated, too far away to communicate, and could end up leaving civilian vessels stranded in deep space.

Basically, the farther you're jumping, the more important it is that your direction of travel be absurdly precise, because when traveling interstellar distances, being a fraction of a degree off could result in ending up lightyears away from where you intended to be.

But all of this is just one possible justification for the trope—only being able to teleport within line-of-sight is another, and the Witling explanation of destination velocity matching/using water to dampen the impact is yet another.
Chabal2
09:02:55 AM 4th Mar 2015
edited by Chabal2
I've often seen the multiple-short-range ones called "Blink" in various media. You should consider putting it through YKTTW.
SolipSchism
09:17:40 AM 4th Mar 2015
I definitely will, since at this point we don't seem to have it. Will link here when I create it.
SolipSchism
10:24:44 AM 4th Mar 2015
Segmented Teleportation YKTTW.

For the love of God, someone, please help me come up with a better name. <_<

close replies  

erazor0707
Medium:
09:04:13 AM 4th Mar 2015
Say you have a group. In said group, you have a few that are the best. However, circumstances like death or transfer decreases the number of these good group members. As a result, the group's overall performance level decreases as a result of those few's absence. Is there a trope for that?
see/hide 3 replies  
DAN004
02:54:23 PM 3rd Mar 2015
erazor0707
08:25:49 AM 4th Mar 2015
Is there a non-death version? Or does this trope cover that too?
Chabal2
09:04:13 AM 4th Mar 2015

close replies  

Chariset
Medium:
04:53:43 AM 4th Mar 2015
Is there a trope for a situation where Bob has a degree or title that sounds impressive but it turns out he bought it online or earned it through a shady Correspondence Course?
see/hide 1 replies  
Synchronicity
04:53:43 AM 4th Mar 2015

close replies  

DAN004
Medium:
01:36:04 AM 4th Mar 2015
Do we have a motivation trope about how someone uses "to honor my dead loved one/brethren" when they're asked why they do what they did?
see/hide 6 replies  
SolipSchism
04:01:36 PM 3rd Mar 2015
Other Stock Phrases?

But no, seriously, I'm not finding anything for the actual concept of honoring the dead. Related to the "What Would X Have Wanted" trope in YKTTW right now, but obviously that doesn't cover what you're seeking since I've seen you on that one already.
DAN004
05:37:58 PM 3rd Mar 2015
So can I make a ykttw out of jt?

P.s what I'm trying to find sounds like what Dead Little Sister sounds like, if only it isn't Cynicism Catalyst.
Chariset
08:36:17 PM 3rd Mar 2015
edited by Chariset
Some variant on And This Is for...?

Could even be The Lost Lenore if the character has more of an impact on the plot dead than alive
DAN004
10:15:55 PM 3rd Mar 2015
Where would this fall?
  • One Piece: Trafalgar Law is on a quest to stop Doflamingo because it's to honor Law's dead benefactor Rocinante, whom Doflamingo killed, and to finish Rocinante's job (stopping Doffy's rampage).
  • Na Ruto: Kakashi's trademark lateness and slight goofiness are revealed to be a tribute to his dead comrade, Obito Uchiha, who used to have those traits.

See, i have both comedic and dramatic usage of it.
Specialist290
11:18:59 PM 3rd Mar 2015
edited by Specialist290
Depending on scope, it might fall under Death by Origin Story or Plot-Triggering Death. I'll look around and see if there might be more options, though.

EDIT: There's also I Let Gwen Stacy Die, which specifically involves cases where the character feels responsible for their loved one's death.
DAN004
01:36:04 AM 4th Mar 2015
It's almost The Lost Lenore, except that it's limited to Love Interests.

close replies  

Chabal2
Medium:
11:23:47 PM 3rd Mar 2015
A trope for the ability to see through disguises like makeup, wigs or facial hair (not True Sight or X-Ray Vision, it's usually the result of training).

In The Hound Of The Baskervilles, Holmes manages to identify a family connection on seeing a portrait from centuries earlier. Watson doesn't see it at first, since the portrait has a curly wig and outdated clothes, but once Holmes hides those it becomes an obvious Identical Grandson.
see/hide 1 replies  
FuzzyWulfe
11:23:47 PM 3rd Mar 2015
There's Sherlock Scan, Hyper Awareness, and Awesome by Analysis for your consideration.

close replies  

DAN004
Medium:
11:16:44 PM 3rd Mar 2015
Do we have a trope for psychological torment?
see/hide 6 replies  
eroock
04:32:31 PM 3rd Mar 2015
From outside: Mind Rape
DAN004
05:36:49 PM 3rd Mar 2015
Mind Rape sounds like a spell. Do we have mundane version of it?
Scorpion451
08:53:26 PM 3rd Mar 2015
edited by Scorpion451
Specialist290
10:05:57 PM 3rd Mar 2015
Quoting the Mind Rape page itself: "one [variation] is a completely "mundane" but no less horrifying brand of torture that nonetheless breaks a character's mind." Mundane examples should be fine.

That said, there's also Break Them by Talking in addition to what's already been mentioned, if you're looking for something particular.
DAN004
10:19:15 PM 3rd Mar 2015
Okay, thanks. Mind Rape and/or Driven to Madness it is.

Btw do we have a related trope for when a monster/villain, who is unseen to the heroes, harrass them (or the narrative makes it sound like they're harrasing them) until they reveal themselves? Many horror/slasher movies do this.
Specialist290
11:16:44 PM 3rd Mar 2015
Sounds like you might be looking for Monster Delay.

close replies  

eroock
Medium:
02:52:46 PM 3rd Mar 2015
When the use of long takes is a trademark of a specific director and is featured in most of his works, is this Creator Thumbprint, Signature Shot or Signature Style?
see/hide 1 replies  
DAN004
02:52:46 PM 3rd Mar 2015

close replies  

sigh824
Medium:
02:44:35 PM 3rd Mar 2015
Where is that trope detailing the rules every mystery must follow? (it's not one of the So You Want To pages). I know it exists, I just can't find it.
see/hide 2 replies  
SolipSchism
01:15:50 PM 3rd Mar 2015
sigh824
02:44:35 PM 3rd Mar 2015
Yeah, thanks

close replies  

ZuTheSkunk
Medium:
12:51:41 PM 3rd Mar 2015
Is there a trope for when the movie/game/whatever throws numerous plot twists at the audience in rapid succession?
see/hide 9 replies  
Freezer
10:01:58 PM 1st Mar 2015
bwburke94
05:02:26 PM 2nd Mar 2015
Before you ask, M. Night Shyamalan is not a trope.
DAN004
05:43:38 PM 2nd Mar 2015
^ my question would be: why are you saying that?
Scorpion451
05:58:06 AM 3rd Mar 2015
M. Night Shyamalan is the living incarnation of the iterated Shocking Swerve.
eroock
07:58:26 AM 3rd Mar 2015
SolipSchism
09:52:34 AM 3rd Mar 2015
I would actually like to see some kind of Plot Twist Conga Line trope. Like, a work (or, more likely, a portion of a work) where the plot twists and Shocking Swerves and Wham Episodes just come one after the other in rapid succession.
FuzzyWulfe
11:35:30 AM 3rd Mar 2015
It's not a movie, but there's a Rocketjump video short featuring Key and Peele that spoofs Xanatos Speed Chess with a kind of Gambit Pileup.
eroock
12:31:30 PM 3rd Mar 2015
^^ Plot Twist Conga Line could work. However, there are cases when it would overlap with Gambit Pileup if the different gambits are only revealed in the grand finale.
SolipSchism
12:51:41 PM 3rd Mar 2015
^ I could see the overlap, but definitely not the same thing. And to be honest, "there are cases when X would overlap with Y" applies to almost any combination of two tropes that aren't actually mutually exclusive.

close replies  

StarTropes
Medium:
11:16:46 AM 3rd Mar 2015
Is there a trope similar to No Fair Cheating but for media other than video games? Something like how in Yu-Gi-Oh!, anyone who cheats during a Shadow Game gets severely punished.
see/hide 2 replies  
Daefaroth
09:10:46 PM 2nd Mar 2015
StarTropes
11:16:46 AM 3rd Mar 2015
Shoulda thought of that myself.

close replies  

DAN004
Medium:
09:56:51 AM 3rd Mar 2015
Canon Foreigner is when an adaptation has a character that the canon doesn't have.

Do we have a trope for when an adaptation has a verse element that the canon doesn't have?
see/hide 5 replies  
Daefaroth
04:51:25 PM 2nd Mar 2015
Can you clarify what you mean by "verse element"?

Is Canon Immigrant what you are looking for?
bwburke94
05:00:21 PM 2nd Mar 2015
No, Canon Immigrant is specifically an adaptation character/element that was later adopted into the source work.
DAN004
05:45:02 PM 2nd Mar 2015
I mean, like Applied Phlebotinum, special device, features that a character/something/someplace didn't have in canon...
eroock
02:48:27 AM 3rd Mar 2015
edited by eroock
[nm]
SolipSchism
09:56:51 AM 3rd Mar 2015
Can you provide an example? Because I think I have the general idea of what you're asking, but I'm having a hard time thinking of any examples.

The closest I can think of is an Ace Combat fanfic I once wrote that posited that one of the characters in the game is an android/artificial intelligence. In the original game, there were no AIs or robots, nor any indication that such technology was possible.

But as far as actual published works, I'm coming up blank.

close replies  

Biagio
Medium:
08:40:33 AM 3rd Mar 2015
I'm wondering if their is a moment trope. Not heartwarming, not necessarily awesome, not quite a tearjerker.

my example is from White Collar. Neil smiling tells Peter he got him a room at a hotel using good will from the latest case. Peter says he has to get his bags but neil has them already packed at the office. Peter asks if Neil wants him to stop staying at his place because he ran neil's friend's prints. Neil smiling but coldly answers that there are alot of reasons.
see/hide 1 replies  
FurAndStone
08:40:33 AM 3rd Mar 2015

close replies  

MarqFJA
Medium:
07:57:52 AM 3rd Mar 2015
Often in fiction (especially where comedy is a major element), a pregnant woman would, at one point or the other (typically in the later stages of her pregnancy), end up throwing a hysterical fit in the presence of her husband and/or friends about how she's now fat and ugly (often with comparisons to large-bodied animals, like whales or hippopotami), and may even hold an exaggerated belief about how her figure will remain forever ruined even after pregnancy. What's the trope for that?
see/hide 4 replies  
MarqFJA
09:08:42 PM 2nd Mar 2015
Bump.
eroock
02:31:19 AM 3rd Mar 2015
Judging by the lack of response, we probably don't have it. It would go somewhere under Hysterical Woman.
MarqFJA
06:07:51 AM 3rd Mar 2015
edited by MarqFJA
Would Weight Woe be applicable? I had just come across it.
eroock
07:57:52 AM 3rd Mar 2015
Looks good to me.

close replies  

superkeijikun
Medium:
04:30:44 AM 3rd Mar 2015
Is there a trope for muscle memory itself? I have a couple of specific examples of this, both from Dragon Ball Z:

  • At the climax of the Android Saga, after Cell had regurgitated 18, reverted to his semi-perfect form, then self-destructed, when he recovered From a Single Cell, his cells' memories of his perfect form allowed him to forgo absorbing 18 again and reattain his perfect form.

  • In Dragon Ball Z: Battle of Gods, Beerus mentions that even though Goku lost his Super Saiyan God form, his body remembered the sensation of it which made him even stronger than before he attained godhood.
see/hide 3 replies  
Freezer
02:32:05 AM 3rd Mar 2015
The Cell example is Came Back Strong.
eroock
02:41:54 AM 3rd Mar 2015
Why would this not go under Damn You, Muscle Memory?
DAN004
04:30:44 AM 3rd Mar 2015
^ It's a Videogame Trope about how muscle memory hinders you.

close replies  

Withoutaname
Medium:
10:55:57 PM 2nd Mar 2015
What's the trope called when someone is performing onstage and then the camera zooms out to reveal his audience is a bunch of puppets/dolls/himself/fakes?
see/hide 2 replies  
DAN004
09:49:49 PM 2nd Mar 2015
Daefaroth
10:55:57 PM 2nd Mar 2015
Chirping Crickets can be related

close replies  

ConnorGorden
Medium:
09:02:47 PM 2nd Mar 2015
This is gonna be a difficult one since I'm not sure how to phrase it.

Is ere a trope for when a character is dying, but they aren't sad because they ( wether through reincarnation or some other force) know that they will meet you again.

I was watching this when I thought of it. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=I5_POOhc56U

see/hide 1 replies  
Daefaroth
09:02:47 PM 2nd Mar 2015

close replies  

Mars
Medium: Anime
05:20:21 PM 2nd Mar 2015
edited by Mars
I'm looking for tropes to update the Tonari no Kaibutsu-kun page. It's become outdated since the manga finished.

  • The first is to replace Ambiguously Gay in Yūzan's section. The reason given is "he has long hair, likes sweets, and doesn't like girls, frequently calling them snakes". He does like girls, but he's afraid of them because of past experiences he's had with his mother and other women his father has been involved with. Sort of subverted when he agrees to go on a date with Iyo, despite her being the very forward type of girl he fears most. By the end of their date he confesses to liking her back, just before her older brother sees them together and drags her away.

  • Secondly, Sasahara's section includes the trope Ship Tease because "It's indicated in a few areas of the series that he has a crush on Natsume. They're Just Friends, though." He ends up confessing to Natsume. She rejects him multiple times. There is a scene at the end of the manga wear we see a picture on her desk of her and a boy that could be anyone, but most fans assume is Sasahara. Should I add this under a spoiler bar or is there another trope I should replace Ship Tease with instead?

  • Also, is there a trope I could add for "not such a nice guy after all" or something?

After Natsume rejects him the first time, he says he's fine with being just friends. Despite that he continually brings up his feelings for her and does things that make her uncomfortable. He eventually demands "You'd better fall in love with me already!" (or "Just fall in love with me already!" depending on translation) while pulling her toward him. In a flashback we see Natsume tell him that the type of guy she hates most is one who acts like a girl's friend but actually has romantic feelings for her and expects her to like him back the same way. He then thinks "I'm exactly the kind of guy she hates most. Ah, oh well." We also find out at the end of the manga that he made Micchan reject her so he could be with her instead.

Natsume asks him several times to make his friends (her Unwanted Harem) stop harassing her, but he brushes her off, at one point laughing and telling her "They're good guys."

Despite all of that, most fans prefer to pair Natsume with Sasahara more than any other character.

  • Natsume is verbally and physically harassed by various male characters throughout the manga, her Unwanted Harem and Andou being the worst, but despite this being a central part of her character the harassment is almost always Played for Laughs. The only exception is Andou, who is older than Micchan and has a fetish for high school girls (even saying at one point "It must be great to do it with a high schooler.").

Is there a trope for this kind of problematic writing that I could add?

  • Lastly, Yamaken drags his sister Iyo away from her date with Yūzan because he incorrectly assumes that Yūzan is a womanizer, and yells at him for this assumed behavior. Note that Yamaken does not act this way because he sees him on a date with his sister, but has always held this opinion of Yūzan because he's handsome and rich, and has an aloof personality that makes him popular with girls - despite the fact that Yamaken himself is also handsome and rich, with an aloof personality that makes him popular with girls, and Yamaken actually is a womanizer.

Is there a specific trope for this kind of behavior or would just Hypocrite be fine?
see/hide 6 replies  
DAN004
01:00:41 AM 1st Mar 2015
Plz, one question per query.
Synchronicity
09:33:49 AM 1st Mar 2015
Agreed, but since it's already here:

1. What's the query here? If he's into girls, then he's not Ambiguously Gay. Maybe Camp Straight? Also check out He-Man Woman Hater.

2. Dogged Nice Guy, Hooked Up Afterwards, maybe Love Revelation Epiphany (if his attempts made her realize she liked him back)

3. "Not such a nice guy after all" — Beneath the Mask, Stepford Smiler, Took a Level in Jerkass, etc

4. All Men Are Perverts

5. Hypocrite, Subverted My Sister Is Off-Limits!.
Adept
01:57:09 PM 1st Mar 2015
Scorpion451
10:01:32 PM 1st Mar 2015
SolipSchism
11:18:34 AM 2nd Mar 2015
I don't think it's necessary to limit this to one question, but bullets/numbered lists are immensely helpful if you have more than one or two questions.

5. sounds like it could be Moral Myopia as well as the ones Synchronicity mentioned.
Scorpion451
05:20:21 PM 2nd Mar 2015
Oh, forgot I was going to mention that being attracted to girls still leaves Ambiguously Bi

close replies  

gasket
Medium: Western Animation
03:56:00 PM 2nd Mar 2015
I'm looking for a trope title in regards to a character on "Hey Arnold!". Sid is one of the bullies on the show but in the episode "Sid's Revenge", you can see that he lives in a run down apartment. It might also explain why he loves his expensive looking boots (because his living condition implies that he and his family don't have a lot of money). Shame of his living conditions (in "Arnold's Room) and greed ("Bag of Money") also might be a big factor in his behavior. So what trope title would describe a bully that doesn't have a lot of money or a character that you might have little sympathy for until you realize that their motivations might have to do in some part to their lack of money?
see/hide 2 replies  
Daefaroth
02:56:38 PM 2nd Mar 2015
gasket
03:56:00 PM 2nd Mar 2015
It would explain how he got his fancy boots despite his run down room. Could the trope also be used to explain a character's greed (due to lack of money)?

close replies  

sentairider42
Medium: Anime
03:32:52 PM 2nd Mar 2015
What trope does the "wow" sound effect from Fairy Tail qualify as?
see/hide 6 replies  
Bisected8
04:57:55 PM 1st Mar 2015
sentairider42
06:45:40 PM 1st Mar 2015
I'm actually referring to the on in the anime
FuzzyWulfe
07:42:34 PM 1st Mar 2015
Without further context, I'm going to go with the assumption that it's part of the Eye Catch. Which just makes it Eye Catch.
sentairider42
07:28:10 AM 2nd Mar 2015
The one I'm talking about is the one that plays at various points during the actual episode (for example, some of the times when Gray spontaneously strips).
FurAndStone
07:41:37 AM 2nd Mar 2015
Maybe a Stock Sound Effect or a Signature Sound Effect? I don't know anything about the show you're talking about, so it might be helpful if you just explained what you're looking for.
DAN004
03:32:52 PM 2nd Mar 2015
Video plz?

close replies  

Inferus54
Medium: Videogame
03:28:54 PM 2nd Mar 2015
edited by Inferus54
Do we have a trope for when a character discovers an ability/tool that makes a previous method of doing something obsolete? Not necessarily limited to video games. For example, in Tomb Raider (2013), Lara acquires a fire striker that allows her to light her torch at will, without having to rely on fire sources in the environment anymore.

Speaking of Tomb Raider (2013), do we have a trope for when a game/movie makes a remake/reboot/remaster and gives it the exact same name as the predecessor? Games like Tomb Raider (2013) and Resident Evil and films like Total Recall come to mind.
see/hide 4 replies  
SolipSchism
03:49:11 PM 27th Feb 2015
Or:

  • In the Dead Kings expansion for Assassin's Creed: Unity, for most of the campaign, whenever Arno is in the catacombs, he needs to periodically refill his lantern whenever it runs out or gets wet. Some of the puzzles take advantage of this to force Arno to go the long way around certain areas to avoid getting the lantern wet. At the end of the story, though, he obtains the Head of Saint-Denis, a lantern that never needs to be refilled.

Your latter example is Recycled Title if it's a reboot or sequel. If it's a remake/remaster, well, it's supposed to be the same story, so why wouldn't they give it the same name?
DAN004
06:54:04 PM 27th Feb 2015
The trope is called So Last Season
SolipSchism
11:37:41 AM 2nd Mar 2015
^ That seems specifically about equipment or abilities becoming obsolete or useless. Would it also apply to cases where you simply don't need to do anything anymore because you have gained an item or ability that obsoletes the task, i.e., Inferus' example of needing to rely on fire sources in the environment, or my similar example of needing to to go certain spots to refill your lantern?

Nothing you have is becoming obsolete; quite the opposite. Your old abiliites and equipment required you to perform an extra task, whereas the new equipment makes that task unnecessary (and in my example, actually impossible).
DAN004
03:28:54 PM 2nd Mar 2015
Speaking of which
  • Oka Mi: Amaterasu can obtain the strongest of each weapon category (Solar Flare, Tundra Beads and Thunder Edge); they allow her to cast elemental brush spells without needing a source.

close replies  

SolipSchism
Medium:
11:42:45 AM 2nd Mar 2015
edited by SolipSchism
Did we have a trope along the lines of "Quoting something famous, but cleverly changing the quote to fit the situation"?

The example that comes to mind is from Doctor Who S12 E5 "Revenge of the Cybermen". After the Doctor narrowly avoids a fiery and explosive death when a rocket is diverted away from the space station he's on, he quips:

Doctor: Cogito ergo sum.
Sarah: What?
Doctor: I think, therefore it missed!
see/hide 2 replies  
Daefaroth
05:46:54 PM 27th Feb 2015
Quote Mine is close.
SolipSchism
11:42:45 AM 2nd Mar 2015
Yep. The only problem is that the description and laconic seem to say that it's basically technically correct paraphrasing that nonetheless subverts (in the real sense of the word "subvert", not the TVT sense) the intended message of a quote, whereas I'm looking for when someone actually changes the content of the quote. And of course, not Quote Swear Unquote, which is specifically about adding profanity to quotes.

close replies  

billybobfred
Medium:
11:32:12 AM 2nd Mar 2015
Do we have a trope for stuff in the realm of "we don't know how the phlebotinum works because it didn't come with a manual"?
see/hide 3 replies  
DAN004
03:22:59 PM 28th Feb 2015
edited by DAN004
immortalfrieza
06:02:23 PM 28th Feb 2015
See also Black Box.
Scorpion451
11:32:12 AM 2nd Mar 2015
edited by Scorpion451
Its also Possession Implies Mastery if they still know all about how to use it, take it apart, fix it or build a new one, build an anti-phebotinum device, etc. despite not having a clue how it works.

close replies  

Chariset
Medium:
11:26:32 AM 2nd Mar 2015
edited by Chariset
Is there a trope for a woman leaving a note (often on the mirror) in lipstick, to say goodbye after a romantic encounter (could be anything from a one-night-stand to a marriage). It's sort of a cross between Couldn't Find a Pen and Not Staying for Breakfast. Most of the examples I can think of come from songs

  • "Lipstick letters across the mirror this morning/ Say 'goodbye, baby'" — Brooks and Dunn, "That Ain't No Way to Go"
  • "My sweet summer is gone/ And on my mirror she made it clear/ Her lipstick can't be wrong" — Dirty Heads, "My Sweet Summer"
  • "With a short little note that said 'I had a good time'/ It was written in lipstick red" — Toby Keith, "Dream Walkin'"
see/hide 1 replies  
SolipSchism
11:26:32 AM 2nd Mar 2015
RuPaul's Drag Race turns this into a Once per Episode ritual fairly early in its run: When a queen is eliminated, she'll scrawl a goodbye message across the work room mirrors in lipstick; when the remaining queens return to the work room, they read the message and then wipe it clean.

close replies  

GregorBrygen
Medium:
11:23:31 AM 2nd Mar 2015
Do we have a trope for when someone is a Death Seeker and is on a Roaring Rampage of Revenge? It seems like it would be common enough to be mentioned here, but I can't seem to find it.
see/hide 5 replies  
DAN004
01:01:20 AM 1st Mar 2015
Example?
immortalfrieza
03:18:13 AM 1st Mar 2015
If the OP is asking what I think they are a good example would be pretty much Max Payne's entire characterization, especially for the entirety of the first game. He goes on a textbook Roaring Rampage of Revenge on those that killed his family/friends/anybody else he cares about in all of the games, but at the same time his MASSIVE survivor guilt means he wouldn't mind getting killed in the process.
DAN004
03:44:55 AM 1st Mar 2015
No reason the example can't be listed with both tropes.
KyleJacobs
10:18:25 PM 1st Mar 2015
Maybe also The Last Dance.
Scorpion451
11:23:31 AM 2nd Mar 2015
edited by Scorpion451
^ Thats the one I was trying to remember. The whole plot of Max Payne is a continuous example of The Last Dance- the fact that he survives for the sequels is a minor subversion of a trope otherwise played completely straight. He fully intends to get revenge or die in the process, preferably both.

close replies  

SeptimusHeap
Medium:
11:14:53 AM 2nd Mar 2015
Do we have a Shout-Out trope specific for Dungeons & Dragons?
see/hide 2 replies  
Bisected8
08:10:07 AM 2nd Mar 2015
edited by Bisected8
You mean in the sense of Small Reference Pools/Geek Reference Pool?
Scorpion451
11:14:53 AM 2nd Mar 2015
pretty sure its still just a Shout-Out, even if its a common shout out. Referenced By lists a lot of the ones that get reference often.

close replies  

randomsurfer
Medium: Live Action TV
10:05:57 AM 2nd Mar 2015
edited by randomsurfer
Is there a non-twin variant of Making Use of the Twin - Making Use Of The Relation With Similar Features? For example in the movie Alice and Bob using actor Charlie's son Charlie Jr. to play Young Bob while Charlie Sr. plays Adult Bob. Or Charlie's nephew, or younger brother, etc. The point is it's someone related to Charlie but not his twin, playing someone who for some textural reason looks similar to/exactly like Charlie.
see/hide 4 replies  
DAN004
09:29:00 PM 1st Mar 2015
Tropes Are Flexible, just use that trope
FuzzyWulfe
12:49:54 AM 2nd Mar 2015
randomsurfer
08:33:34 AM 2nd Mar 2015
But that's using the relative to play a relative. Charlie Jr. playing Charlie's son or something. Here Charlie Jr is playing Charlie. Or maybe Charlie's brother Emilio is playing someone unrelated to Charlie, but it's plot relevant that they look like they could be related.
FuzzyWulfe
10:05:57 AM 2nd Mar 2015
There are examples of having children or siblings playing time displaced versions of each other among other scenarios. The trope is pretty much a catch-all for when there's some kind of real life relationship between the actors in a property. Like how Will Smith had his real children portray his movie children in two movies.

close replies  

Caprica12
Medium:
07:24:48 AM 2nd Mar 2015
Guys, on your opinion what trope in the Afterlife Tropes fits the afterlife of Sansūkh (http://archiveofourown.org/works/855528/chapters/1637607)?
see/hide 2 replies  
Scorpion451
10:58:49 AM 26th Feb 2015
Can we get a synopsis?
Caprica12
07:24:48 AM 2nd Mar 2015
The living are the favorite soap-opera of the dead ones.

close replies  

DAN004
Medium:
05:32:55 AM 2nd Mar 2015
Do we have a trope about an Aesop: "even the wisest man can make mistakes"?
see/hide 3 replies  
Daefaroth
06:45:33 AM 1st Mar 2015
Scorpion451
04:51:52 AM 2nd Mar 2015
Humans Are Flawed (What makes a person wise is not that they never make mistakes, its that they allow for the possibility that they can make one, and learn from it when they do.)
DAN004
05:32:55 AM 2nd Mar 2015
^ That sounds good enough, thanks.

close replies  

Synchronicity
Medium:
05:31:48 AM 2nd Mar 2015
Do we have an adaptation trope where just a few aspects of the story are changed to better reflect modern times, but the story is still the same?

Specifically I'm thinking of the recent film version of The Last Five Years which certain lyrics are changed from the original libretto (from 2002): eg. "well-placed tattoos" in place of "looked like Tom Cruise" to describe an attractive guy, or "...people who cast Russell Crowe in a musical" instead of "Linda Blair" to describe frustrations with the theater industry, etc.
see/hide 1 replies  
DAN004
05:31:48 AM 2nd Mar 2015
edited by DAN004

close replies  

Chabal2
Medium:
04:43:15 AM 2nd Mar 2015
I wanted to create a trope where university students are treated as an expendable and renewable ressource (usually for scientific experiments), but then saw we had Disposable Intern. Are they separate enough to warrant a new trope?

For example, first-year students in the Discworld's university are used to collect the highly poisonous frogs needed for the Bursar's sanity pills, with a high turnover rate.
see/hide 1 replies  
Scorpion451
04:43:15 AM 2nd Mar 2015
Yeah, I'd say Disposable Intern covers grad students/undergraduate assistants- a lot of times they actually call things like that internships.

close replies  

Freezer
Medium:
02:17:29 AM 2nd Mar 2015
edited by Freezer
Know I've seen this, can't re-find it: A historical figure, real or fictional, is revered as a god-like figure, without raising them to deity level. The one example that comes to mind for me is from The Isle Of Rangoon, where the Rangoons revere Jim Henson as a sort of universal father figure (they know he didn't create them, but without him, they don't get created) and Kermit The Frog as the Number One Son.
see/hide 2 replies  
FurAndStone
10:40:45 PM 1st Mar 2015
Freezer
02:17:29 AM 2nd Mar 2015
Cult of Personality is what I was looking for. Thanks!

close replies  

DAN004
Medium:
01:54:55 AM 2nd Mar 2015
Is thjs I Choose to Stay?

  • One Piece: Princess Vivi had already been traveling with the Straw Hat Pirates for a while until they get to Vivi's country and solved the rebellion/mafia problems there. The crew wanted Vivi to come join the crew, but then she chooses to stay in her country to rebuild it. She still has her place as Honorary True Companion.
see/hide 1 replies  
Synchronicity
01:54:55 AM 2nd Mar 2015
Not if it's her home country. More like But Now I Must Go (because she's leaving her "new" world)

close replies  

lalalei2001
Medium:
01:53:02 AM 2nd Mar 2015
Is there a trope for two enemy factions uniting, but planning to backstab each other secretly?
see/hide 2 replies  
DAN004
09:28:35 PM 1st Mar 2015
Synchronicity
01:53:02 AM 2nd Mar 2015

close replies  

greenwings
Medium:
10:29:51 PM 28th Feb 2015
edited by greenwings
Is there a trope for when someone runs toward danger (away from safety) to grab something important to them?
see/hide 1 replies  
Scorpion451
10:29:51 PM 28th Feb 2015
Sometimes its Skewed Priorities

close replies  

thecuriousostrich
Medium:
08:22:33 PM 28th Feb 2015
2 people are talking. Looks very serious. Person C walks up. "What are you guys talking about?" "Nothing" "Oh ok." And person C never mentions it again.

Or variants thereof. Basically, people never, ever, try to solve mysteries or investigate people acting mysteriously. They just let it go in ways real people never, ever would. If you saw your friend having a deep conversation, or even crying, and they tired to play it off as nothing, you would NEVER accept that. You'd investigate. But TV people just take the nothing for an answer. Also , characters have an uncanny ability to let things go/not worry about things that would absolutely eat you ALIVE if you were thinking about them.

Practically the trademark sin of period dramas, possibly due to the enforced manners of the time periods.
see/hide 3 replies  
DAN004
10:57:29 PM 27th Feb 2015
Weirdness Censor

And you do know MYOB is Truth In Tv, right?
thecuriousostrich
11:13:08 PM 27th Feb 2015
Yes, that was my point about the enforced manners of the time periods - people told to mind their own business were expected to. It still often seems to go beyond reasonable human expectation. Downton Abbey is a chronic offender. Weirdness Censor seems kind of accurate but not quite - the people do notice something weird going on, but after being told it's no big deal, carry on completely normally.
Scorpion451
08:22:33 PM 28th Feb 2015
edited by Scorpion451
Its not necessarily a matter of keeping things an Open Secret. Generally, people are very much aware that there are things You Do NOT Want to Know, and if someone doesn't want to talk about something its probably best to just leave the subject alone- particularly when that person is in a position to fire you or make your life a living hell.

close replies  

Adept
Medium:
02:47:13 PM 28th Feb 2015
Do we have a trope for the "incredibly critical, hard to please judge" that is common in Tournament Arcs and Talent Shows?

Because Shokugeki No Soma listed this type of judges as Caustic Critic, and I'm pretty sure that's not really the same trope.
see/hide 2 replies  
DAN004
07:47:08 AM 28th Feb 2015
Adept
02:47:13 PM 28th Feb 2015
Even though the judge is not a British or even a foreigner?

close replies