Lost And Found

You've got this trope sticking in your mind. You can remember the general idea, and maybe an example or two, but you'll be damned if you can remember what the thing's called, and the search function turns up nothing relevant. Ask about it here.
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Faar
Medium:
07:19:26 AM 31st Jul 2014
Is there a trope for text commands in computer interfaces? In a lot of movies and television shows you see users enter an exact text command in a computer to perform an action, like: "send to John" or "print results". For example: I was watching Oceans Thirteen. When one criminal was caught, the police asked the computer to "Search for known associates". Then, the results were "Send to Bank". It is clear for the public what is happening, but in real life this does not occur. Normally, you point and click your way through an application. Instead, in this example one has to select the 'Send' button, browse in the address list for the recepient and than again click a 'Send' button. I thought Viewer-Friendly Interface was a suitable trope, but this topic is not covered.
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DAN004
04:21:57 AM 31st Jul 2014
Bisected8
04:26:35 AM 31st Jul 2014
edited by Bisected8
That's actually how people used to do it before GUIs were developed (in fact you still can, if you open Command Prompt - assuming you're using windows) and that's more or less the syntax they accept.

Maybe Hollywood Hacking? I don't think we have a specific "using command line" trope. Perhaps Technology Marches On or Our Graphics Will Suck In The Future, or an Inverted Trope Extreme Graphical Representation for the lack of a GUI?
randomsurfer
07:19:26 AM 31st Jul 2014
edited by randomsurfer
I'll add Viewer-Friendly Interface and maybe Rapid-Fire Typing to the list Bisected8 gave.

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MCE
Medium:
06:59:13 AM 31st Jul 2014
edited by MCE
Do we have a page for spy/ saboteur/ skulduggery units in Real Time Strategy games? A quick look at the Real-Time Strategy page doesn't show them and I can think of a few off the top of my head.

  • Spy from Red Alert games - disguises as enemy, steals info to make unique units, resets superweapon timers, brides enemies and powers down buildings.
  • Saboteur form Command & Conquer: Generals -powers down buildings, resets super weapon timers and steals money.
  • Spy from Machines Wired For War - steals research and lays mines
  • Spy form Populous: The Beginning- disguises as enemy and sets fire to buildings.
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DAN004
06:59:13 AM 31st Jul 2014

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SpoonElemental
Medium:
05:20:16 AM 31st Jul 2014
edited by SpoonElemental
An Implacable Man or The Dreaded (or both) decides or is ordered to kill Bob who is a largely unknown person. Bob ignores the threat and writes it off but when they actually attack Bob immediately decapitates or otherwise kills the threat completely effortlessly.
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Bisected8
05:20:16 AM 31st Jul 2014

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Synchronicity
Medium:
12:52:36 AM 31st Jul 2014
Is there a trope for someone having taught themselves how to read to show how they "rose above" their previous condition? Or is that already covered by Never Learned to Read (which is more of a cast thing)?
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Hero_Gal_2347
Medium:
11:59:12 PM 30th Jul 2014
Is there a trope for this? When one of the heroes is unusually nasty (to whatever degree) to a new character, the new character trends to be a Jerk In Sheep's Clothing.
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JoieDeCombat
02:41:04 PM 29th Jul 2014
edited by JoieDeCombat
Hero_Gal_2347
06:04:33 PM 29th Jul 2014
It may be implied that the hero was "the only person who could see through them."
Hero_Gal_2347
09:32:15 PM 30th Jul 2014
DAN004
11:59:12 PM 30th Jul 2014
Maybe Detect Evil?

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SharleeD
Medium:
08:12:00 PM 30th Jul 2014
Do we have a trope for when a character dies by being pulled through an opening (usually by a monster, occasionally by Continuous Decompression or some supernatural force) that's so small, their body folds up on itself and their foot sticks up near their face in transit? It's used in monster movies like Deep Rising, often so that the creature yanking them down can be kept out of view even as it demonstrates its terrible strength.
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windyshadow32
08:12:00 PM 30th Jul 2014
bump

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Andrew
Medium: Music
08:09:25 PM 30th Jul 2014
Do we have a trope for occasions where a character or artist uses a metaphor or comparison without realizing the implications of the metaphor/comparison? I'm thinking of things like, "Our love is real, just like Romeo and Juliet!"

Or, to be specific, there's a musician I really like who wrote a song I really like that includes the lyrics "Forget the truth/Until tomorrow/You'll be my Hughes/I'll be your Harlow." There are some issues with comparing your boyfriend to Howard Hughes, and those issues aren't intentional.
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Hero_Gal_2347
03:44:35 PM 30th Jul 2014
Andrew
08:09:25 PM 30th Jul 2014
Indeed! Thank you.

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RabidTanker
Medium:
07:51:41 PM 30th Jul 2014
edited by RabidTanker
Do we have an trope for these Insecticon Kickback quotes? "Is it something to eat, eat, eat?" "Ohhh, you won't catch me, me, me!" (Note the verbal tic)
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Freezer
07:51:41 PM 30th Jul 2014
Verbal Tic. Unless you meant that particular tic (repeating the last word three times). Don't think we have a specific subtrope.

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hcobb
Medium:
04:02:30 PM 30th Jul 2014
What's the trope for a huge eye displayed in a magnifying glass, especially if there is no eye behind the lens like this:

http://usa.chinadaily.com.cn/opinion/2014-07/24/content_17911624.htm
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DAN004
05:02:42 PM 28th Jul 2014
randomsurfer
08:08:39 AM 29th Jul 2014
A variation of Eye Take?
hcobb
09:50:22 AM 30th Jul 2014
Seems closer to Eye Pop ?
randomsurfer
04:02:30 PM 30th Jul 2014
^You right.

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Rotpar
Medium:
10:58:09 AM 30th Jul 2014
edited by Rotpar
What's the appropriate trope for when something small has more explosive power than it warrants? In Doom the rocket launcher fires D-cell battery sized rockets—justifying why the player in the original game can carry fifty of the things.

Nothing in the text specifically suggests how powerful the rockets are, other than it being a rocket launcher: they use it on "boss" monsters, densely-packed swarms, and one key-card locked door. They're not absurdly powerful like tiny nukes, but a D battery is still very small for what's implied to be like a futuristic LAW or RPG-7.
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DAN004
05:17:43 AM 29th Jul 2014
"Something small has more explosive power than it warrants"

Atoms. Especially when you crack'em. Just ask Hiroshima.
Kakai
06:24:28 AM 29th Jul 2014
I'd say it's the inversion of BFG; while BFG played straight is big weapon with big firepower, inversion would be actually small weapon with big firepower.

(at least that's how Men In Black page categorize Noisy Cricket, which is exactly what you describe)
DAN004
05:58:44 PM 29th Jul 2014
Rotpar
10:58:09 AM 30th Jul 2014
Interesting if we don't have it. Because it could be an inversion of BFG and essentially Pintsized Powerhouse for weapons.

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justanotherrandomlurker
Medium:
09:30:04 AM 30th Jul 2014
What do we have that covers these two situations:

1. When in-universe, everything is done or said in a way that's pretty much backwards to or the opposite of convention, yet it's treated as normal? Cow and Chicken is a great example of this: male characters are refered to as "Girls," "Ladies," "Gals"; cereal is eaten with forks; a stand-up performance includes the comic telling sad stories, etc.

2. Bob and Alice have different perspectives about something and argue about it, and after they experience it first hand, in the end their perspectives have flipped? For example: in an episode of Dexter's Laboratory, Dee Dee believes ants are icky and need to be stomped while Dexter insists ants are to respected, so he shrinks them down to see what ant life is really like; after Dexter is virtually tortured as a slave ant, and Dee Dee basically just plays with them, when they return to normal size, Dee Dee agrees ants are amazing, while Dexter starts stomping them.
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Bisected8
09:30:04 AM 30th Jul 2014
edited by Bisected8

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Larkmarn
Medium: Live Action TV
07:01:23 AM 30th Jul 2014
Do we have something for where a show doesn't have a grand season finale, and the season sort of... ends without any sort of climax. Dénouement Episode is related, but not quite the same.
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DAN004
07:01:23 AM 30th Jul 2014

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DAN004
Medium:
03:44:11 AM 30th Jul 2014
What's the difference of Kill the God and Did You Just Punch Out Cthylhu
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Bisected8
03:33:56 AM 30th Jul 2014
  • Did You Just Punch Out Cthulhu? is when a character fights something vastly more powerful than them (which may or may not be a god) and wins.
  • Kill the God is about...well, killing a god; in the sense of a powerful being that represents an aspect of the cosmos. It might involve Did You Just Punch Out Cthulhu? if they fight the god head on, but there are plenty of ways to do it without resorting to fisticuffs.

Examples:

DAN004
03:44:11 AM 30th Jul 2014
Lots of overlaps that I think that they can be merged together. But thanks, I can see the difference :D
DAN004
03:44:11 AM 30th Jul 2014
Lots of overlaps that I think that they can be merged together. But thanks, I can see the difference :D

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DAN004
Medium:
01:20:35 AM 30th Jul 2014
What's the difference of Kill the God and Did You Just Punch Out Cthulhu?
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Hero_Gal_2347
12:28:24 AM 30th Jul 2014
edited by Hero_Gal_2347
From what I read, Did You Just Punch Out Cthulhu? may be a supertrope to Kill the God. It might be that Cthulhu punching can be practiced on anything vastly more powerful than the protagonist.
Synchronicity
01:20:35 AM 30th Jul 2014
Also, punching doesn't equate to killing.

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RGM-79
Medium:
10:20:39 PM 29th Jul 2014
Howdy, I'm a new troper, and hoping to put this under the TV documentary series 'mayday'. Not quite sure what to call it though, I don't think it's 'Defiant to the end' or 'face death with dignity'.

"* Captain Ted Thompson and First Officer William Tansky from Alaska Airlines Flight 261 count as such. On January 31, 2000, their MD-83's horizontal stabilizer suffered a catastrophic failure of its jackscrew. The failure put the jet in a nose down position and inverted the plane. Both Thompson and Tansky fought to the end to recover the aircraft, even attempting to fly the airliner inverted. Sadly, it wasn't enough to save the plane or its 88 passengers and crew. "
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Dalillama
10:20:39 PM 29th Jul 2014
Probably Dying Moment Of Awsome; Defiant to the End almost has it, but not quite.

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DAN004
Medium:
05:58:05 PM 29th Jul 2014
What's the trope for when a vehicle (or sometimes a person) is running so fast that it leaves a trail of fire?
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Kakai
06:25:24 AM 29th Jul 2014
Foe-Tossing Charge? I guess it's one of the attributes.
JoieDeCombat
07:15:00 AM 29th Jul 2014
DAN004
05:58:05 PM 29th Jul 2014
Aye, thanks.

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LordHerobrine
Medium:
05:54:58 PM 29th Jul 2014
Do we have a trope (possibly more of a YMMV) that depicts the assumption that all opinions are crap, or is that just part of the GIFT theory?

I'm referring mostly to when people state an opinion, and regardless of whether or not that opinion is just that- an opinion, it is still crap. Comments and forums are where this is most heavily prevalent, especially if your opinion leads to Flame Bait, Flame War, and unleashes an Internet Backdraft. It doesn't even have to be an inflammatory opinion. If its there, someone will call it crap.

Sort of related to Sturgeon's Law, except that this assumes that ALL opinions are crud. Noticeable on Youtube 90% of the time.
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bitemytail
10:47:44 AM 29th Jul 2014
Looking at the Logical Fallacies page, this could fall under a couple of them. I'm not entirely sure what you're looking for.
LordHerobrine
02:21:33 PM 29th Jul 2014
edited by LordHerobrine
It's something I see a lot on opinions, specifically in youtube comments. X states an opinion and Y tells him his opinion is crap. Then follows a long hate war where X and Y argue that opinions are opinions and cannot be judged at all. It's part of GIFT in the fact that usually both people sound like jerks, arguing back and forth with a liberal dose of name-calling and ASS-umptions about the other person.

During the argument, a bunch of Logical Fallacies tropes are pulled, however, what usually happens is that X and Y end up arguing over the fallacies and invoking them at the same time. It's never one fallacy trope; it's multiple being invoked in the same conversation.

I was wondering if there was a trope that described this certain activity or preference to argue, since I see it often.
DAN004
05:54:58 PM 29th Jul 2014

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Zanreo
Medium:
05:52:35 PM 29th Jul 2014
edited by Zanreo
Is there a trope for when a character pretends to be the enemy/rival/ect. of another character for whatever reason, while in reality they're working together? I only found Reverse Mole, and while sort of similar, I'm looking for something where the characters KNOW they're on the same side and purposefully pretending to be enemies.
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StarTropes
04:23:26 PM 29th Jul 2014
Either The Mole or Reverse Mole, depending on whether he's really working for the good guys or the bad guys.
Zanreo
04:24:58 PM 29th Jul 2014
edited by Zanreo
I found Reverse Mole when searching, and while sort of similar, I'm looking for something specifically where the characters KNOW they're on the same side/worked together from the start, and purposefully pretending to be enemies, keeping up that appearance in public. Reverse Mole seems in many cases be when the other character doesn't know they're on the same side.
DAN004
05:52:35 PM 29th Jul 2014

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lordGacek
Medium:
03:35:10 PM 29th Jul 2014
Which trope it is, when a character faces an enemy who forms several illusions of himself, so that character has to decide which one is the real deal to (for example) shoot? It's certainly related to Spot the Impostor, Spotting the Thread, and similar tropes, but I can't quite pick the right one.

An example: in one episode of Texas Ranger, Walker had to deal with a shaman doing this trick and he had only a knife. Then he noticed that only one of the visages sweats, and threw the knife into his guts.
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Bisected8
03:23:40 PM 29th Jul 2014
Doppelgänger Attack or Doppelgänger Spin (when its used for attack or defence respectively).
lordGacek
03:35:10 PM 29th Jul 2014
That's it. Totally not the direction I expected to see it come from. Thanks.

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Kakai
Medium:
03:24:28 PM 29th Jul 2014
Do we have a trope when subordinate does something before consulting his boss because he has no time? I mean kind of "better to apologize later than wait now" attitude where boss might have no choice but to go along with it.
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eroock
03:24:28 PM 29th Jul 2014
Sounds like a Bavarian Fire Drill (if invoked by the hero)

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Jokubas
Medium: Videogame
02:25:15 PM 29th Jul 2014
Is there a trope for how, in games, if you see an egg/larva (especially for insectoid enemies) you will either be required to or at least able to destroy them, but the catch is, that when you destroy the eggs, the creature will always, always (okay not literally, but pretty close to it), emerge unscathed, and sometimes even fully grown?
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SgtFrog1
03:45:30 PM 8th Jul 2013
edited by SgtFrog1
You Can't Thwart Stage One? It'd be too easy to just smash the eggs, so they pop out and eat your face anyway!
MsAmiClassified
11:41:15 PM 9th Jul 2013
How are all these queries ending up halfway down the page only a day after being posted?

You Can't Thwart Stage One is more about not being able to stop the Big Bad's Evil Plan before it truly gets rolling, so I don't think so.
MsAmiClassified
04:00:01 PM 13th Jul 2013
Anyone?
DAN004
07:06:33 PM 13th Jul 2013
I've seen it in a YKTTW before...
Fighteer
moderator
02:20:22 PM 29th Jul 2014
edited by Fighteer
I was thinking about this one as well the other day. The trope is that eggs, mostly in video games, are always:

  • Left untended by anything observable as a parent.
  • Contain mature (or at least independent), aggressive specimens that attack the nearest character when their egg is broken, or spontaneously hatch when the character approaches.
  • Are apparently waiting inside this egg patiently as a mature creature rather than getting on with the whole hatching business.

I'm surprised we don't have this one.

Fighteer
moderator
02:25:15 PM 29th Jul 2014

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BradyLady
Medium:
01:52:06 PM 29th Jul 2014
edited by BradyLady
Betty has a habit of always getting it just slightly wrong in some vital way, whenever Alice asks for something. She makes it look like she's put in every effort, but it's not exactly what Alice asked for. Alice is not allowed to be disappointed but is expected to suck it up and appreciate the effort. Specifically:

Betty: "I'm going to the store. Does anyone need anything?"

Alice: "I'd like a box of Grape-Nuts cereal, please."

Betty returns with a sack of grapefruit instead. "Oh... that's not what you asked for? I guess I got confused."

Of course, if Alice shows any sign at all of being disappointed, she gets a stern lecture from Carol and/or Debbie. "Nobody's perfect, Alice. Haven't you ever made a mistake in your life? At least Betty tried."

What's the game here? It seems to me if it were actually gaslighting, Betty would be insisting that Alice had asked for grapefruit all along, and never said anything about Grape-Nuts cereal. It's Alice who is confused. Maybe she should call her doctor and have her dosage checked. In this case the goal is to make Alice feel like she's being unreasonable and overdemanding if she presses the issue. She strongly suspects Betty got it wrong on purpose, just so that Carol and Debbie *would* play the "nobody's perfect" card and go after Alice. But then, since they are trying to make Alice feel like she's the one who's off in the head while the rest of them are fine, is that still gaslighting?

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DAN004
08:41:45 PM 22nd Jul 2014
So what's the focus of the problem? Or is it about the confusion over what the real problem is?
FunkySquid
10:22:39 PM 22nd Jul 2014
From what I can gather is this:

Alice asks for something Betty 'accidentally' gets something wrong, just to piss Alice off Carol and Debbie side with Betty

I think the difference is that gas lighting is when the goal is to convince Alice that she's losing her mind. This is just BCD messing with her, for funsies or because they hate Alice.
DAN004
10:36:10 PM 22nd Jul 2014
BradyLady
12:25:24 AM 23rd Jul 2014
It's the confusion. I'm not sure whether this is a form of gaslighting, although I think it is, or something else.

Pure gaslighting would be if Alice asks for Grape-Nuts, Betty comes home with grapefruit, and then everybody claims Alice asked for grapefruit in the first place. But by "accidentally" getting it wrong and then not allowing Alice to show her disappointment, they *are* trying to convince Alice that she isn't a very nice person. They want her to question herself, instead of recognizing that they are messing with her For the Lulz or For the Evulz. So wouldn't this also be gaslighting?
Freezer
12:48:34 AM 23rd Jul 2014
BradyLady
01:33:37 AM 23rd Jul 2014
edited by BradyLady
(nods thoughtfully) The term "passive-aggressive" perfectly applies to Betty "forgetting" what Alice actually wanted, but it seems Passive-Aggressive Kombat is more like "Lovely dress, dear. Too bad they didn't have your size."
FunkySquid
08:41:08 PM 25th Jul 2014
I agree with Dan. Some kind of troll.
Kilyle
01:50:30 AM 26th Jul 2014
Are we specifically after Betty deliberately getting it wrong, or Alice merely suspecting that she knows what she's doing?

Can't think of which trope it would fit, but seems like this would get irritating through repetition, or through the consequences of the forgetting being much worse than mere forgetting. Like... well, the example I can think of, not so much with forgetting, is Betty trying to fix Alice's phone and ending up getting it stuck in lock-out mode so they need to factory-reset the phone and lose all the data Alice had on her phone. Or there's a Zits comic in which Pierce tries to fix Jeremy's guitar and ends up breaking it, then progressively taking parts from every other electronic device in the room just to "fix" the guitar, and never being willing to just call it quits and admit he screwed up, as Jeremy just looks on with more and more dismay as every time he turns his back Pierce has grabbed a new piece of something or other....
BradyLady
03:48:47 AM 27th Jul 2014
edited by BradyLady
OK, I think I understand the confusion.

The trope (if it is one) that I'm zeroing in on is, Betty always messes up what Alice asks for, BUT if Alice complains, they all gang up on her to make her feel like SHE is being unreasonable. Betty is messing up on purpose, for the specific reason of setting Alice up to look petty and demanding when she isn't satisfied. Of course, Betty would never admit this (neither will Carol or Debbie) and will make a great point of how she tried her best, but just can't ever seem to make Alice happy.
BradyLady
03:55:23 AM 27th Jul 2014
edited by BradyLady
^^Addendum to the above: They aren't trying to make her think she's going insane, but they ARE trying to make her think there is something wrong with her personality. Their bottom line is that they want Alice to stay feeling vaguely guilty, and full of self-loathing, convinced that she is the problem, not Betty. Chances are it's still going to end with Alice in therapy, and that's why I'm thinking it's a form of gaslighting. (The Zits thing might be Stop Helping Me!?)
DAN004
04:23:07 AM 27th Jul 2014
It is gaslighting indeed.
Scorpion451
08:43:15 AM 27th Jul 2014
edited by Scorpion451
This is 100% The Complainer Is Always Wrong mixed with Passive-Aggressive Kombat. Its only gaslighting if they're trying to drive her insane by telling her that she asked for a bag of grapefruit.
FunkySquid
10:23:51 PM 27th Jul 2014
edited by FunkySquid
I don't think it sounds as malicious as gas lighting, which would be more of a Morality Event Horizon for Betty, Carol and Debbie. They don't sound evil, just obnoxious terrible people. Depends how long the abuse had been going on for, though. Passive-Aggressive Kombat is more about general bitchiness, so to speak, so it's not fully appropriate.

If this is common enough (I don't know any examples myself), it could be worthy of its own trope. Although it would be at risk of The Same but More Specific.

Also, Grape-Nuts cereal?
DAN004
12:53:34 AM 28th Jul 2014
BradyLady
01:52:06 PM 29th Jul 2014
After reading all suggestions, I'd say it's both downplayed gaslighting and [1].

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bitemytail
Medium:
11:59:37 AM 29th Jul 2014
Is there a trope for when a stalker watches someone sleep?

On a similar note, is there a trope for when someone that isn't a stalker watches someone sleep?
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Larkmarn
11:57:25 AM 29th Jul 2014
edited by Larkmarn
The former is just part of Stalker with a Crush. The latter is Beautiful Dreamer.
randomsurfer
11:59:37 AM 29th Jul 2014
The non-stalkery version is Beautiful Dreamer.

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Lenoxus
Medium:
11:59:21 AM 29th Jul 2014
One or more characters has a time limit to accrue a specific amount of money or else face dire consequences (eg, losing one's house). This plot offers lots of opportunity for variety because money can be obtained in many different ways. I have to assume this one exists somewhere here.
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DAN004
05:54:50 PM 28th Jul 2014
Synchronicity
08:45:15 PM 28th Jul 2014
Lenoxus
11:57:26 AM 29th Jul 2014
Thanks both. Maybe this should exist but maybe not.
Lenoxus
11:57:26 AM 29th Jul 2014
Thanks both. Maybe this should exist but maybe not.
Larkmarn
11:59:21 AM 29th Jul 2014

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justanotherrandomlurker
Medium:
08:45:03 AM 29th Jul 2014
edited by justanotherrandomlurker
When a character instantly falls unconscious by having another character sneak up on them and cover their face (specifically, their nose and mouth) with a hanky or other piece of cloth fall under Instant Sedation or Tap on the Head?

I've seen it quite often in fiction, though I seem to recall it actually being lampshaded/exaggerated on Chappelle's Show once.
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JoieDeCombat
08:45:03 AM 29th Jul 2014
That would be covered by Instant Sedation.

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comicwriter
Medium:
05:15:57 AM 29th Jul 2014
Is there a specific trope for when a bad guy killing someone would be logical and adventageous for their situation, but for no real reason they simply tie them up or knock them out instead, even when it goes against their personality?

It reoccurs a lot in the media but the specific thing that got me thinking was an old Super Sentai episode where the Shapeshifter bad guy performed a Kill and Replace plot....except for some reason she inexplicably left the original woman alive, thus allowing the plan to be unraveled.
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DAN004
01:05:49 AM 29th Jul 2014
Bisected8
02:37:31 AM 29th Jul 2014
Just Shoot Him.

JHH is a slightly different trope.
DAN004
05:15:57 AM 29th Jul 2014
^ JSH refers to Combat Pragmatist, the opposite of what the op want.

Maybe you meant Why Don't You Just Shoot Him?

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DAN004
Medium:
09:48:59 PM 28th Jul 2014
In games with Karma Meter, sometimes the players' abilities are tied to said meter. Depending on your morality, you may access different abilities, or a general ability would have different effects.

Do we have this? If not, do we need this?
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FuzzyWulfe
09:48:59 PM 28th Jul 2014
Pretty sure it's just Karma Meter. There just aren't many games that have taken advantage of using your karma to unlock a Tech Tree or just be incorporated into a Class and Level System. I think one of the Star Wars examples mentions using it to allow wearing certain equipment, though.

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DAN004
Medium:
06:35:22 PM 28th Jul 2014
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FuzzyWulfe
07:34:39 PM 25th Jun 2014
Per the description, No-Holds-Barred Beatdown is when the recipient is unable or no longer able to fight back or defend themselves in any way; Curb-Stomp Battle is when the recipient can but is grossly outmatched. There Is No Kill Like Overkill differs from Curb-Stomp Battle in that the latter at least has the semblance of being fair, ie a bodybuilder versus an equal sized boxer. The former is using far more resources than is necessary and doesn't have to apply to combat. An example would be like using a militarized power armor against a common street thug, and unloading the entire ammo load of every weapon it has weapon by weapon even though you saw the thug take the first volley of machine gun fire in the chest and fall over.
Tabs
07:42:53 PM 25th Jun 2014
A No-Holds-Barred Beatdown is a brutal/gory/more realistic Curb-Stomp Battle, while There Is No Kill Like Overkill is wasting time and resources overdoing something for satisfaction.
DAN004
08:53:04 PM 25th Jun 2014
Uh, I wonder if they (or at least NHBB and CSB) can be mixed together... the distinction is very small.
Tabs
09:53:04 PM 25th Jun 2014
NHBB is a subtrope (I think) of CSB, the latter being simply "one side is much stronger than the other, so the fight is one-sided", while the former is a longer beating and frequently involves There's No Kill Like Overkill. The three tropes can overlap.
DAN004
10:52:12 PM 25th Jun 2014
^ so it is The Same but More?
FuzzyWulfe
12:15:48 AM 26th Jun 2014
Each is distinct. Each can include the other but doesn't have to. If two fighters are trading blows equally, but one gets the upper hand and beats the other past unconsciousness; that's No-Holds-Barred Beatdown but not Curb-Stomp Battle since they were equal. Curb-Stomp Battle can end with a No-Holds-Barred Beatdown, but it can also end with the winner stopping when the other is unconscious. There Is No Kill Like Overkill can be part of a Curb-Stomp Battle and can sometimes include No-Holds-Barred Beatdown. If you used a rocketlauncher on someone with a pistol, that would be just Curb-Stomp Battle. If you dropped a nuclear bomb on that person, that would be There Is No Kill Like Overkill.
DAN004
12:59:44 AM 26th Jun 2014
In short, CSB is about unfair matches, and NHBB is about excessive beatdowns?
FuzzyWulfe
02:02:38 AM 26th Jun 2014
Pretty much. Like I said, the first major distinction is whether the person being beat has the capacity to fight/defend in any way. Unconscious, severe injuries, dead, restrained, or any other time when there is no way to fight/defend at all means No-Holds-Barred Beatdown. If they can fight or defend but that ability is largely ineffective, than it's Curb-Stomp Battle.
DAN004
11:03:41 AM 26th Jun 2014
^ i see, thanks :D
FuzzyBoots
11:47:55 AM 26th Jun 2014
Bizarrely enough, that the complete opposite of what the terms sound like in my head. Any sort of beatdown makes it sound like there's still a fight whereas curbstomping someone is something you do to a fallen foe who can't defend themselves.

Wasn't there a time when the distinction was based on whether it was the protagonists or the antagonists who were the ones involved in a one-sided fight?
DAN004
03:43:28 AM 28th Jul 2014
Now I wanna ask: where would "death by getting shot multiple times" go into?
Freezer
04:07:48 PM 28th Jul 2014
To use examples from Dragon Ball Z's Freezer Saga:

FuzzyWulfe
06:35:22 PM 28th Jul 2014
Death by getting shot multiple times is Theres No Kill Like Overkill.

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Gojirob
Medium: Live Action TV
11:59:32 AM 28th Jul 2014
Is there a specific trope for when the main character's ex has lucked into a new love who is nightmarishly beyond perfect, so much so that even if the ex didn't rub it in, it would be all the same difference?

I recall seeing this on Dream On, a sitcom starring George Carlin, Herman's Head and not a few others.
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FunkySquid
Medium:
07:13:37 AM 28th Jul 2014
Heya, the trope I'm going for is when a small detail changes between shots in the same scene.

In the video I'm planning to add an example to, a character is wearing an overshirt, then is not, and then inexplicably is again and takes it off.

Its an editing thing, and I know its really common, but for the life of me I can't remember the name of the trope.
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DAN004
10:34:56 PM 22nd Jul 2014
I remembered a ykttw to this effect before.

FunkySquid
10:41:43 PM 22nd Jul 2014
Was it ever put into a trope? I swear there IS a trope for it, I've seen it ... somewhere ...
randomsurfer
07:23:26 AM 23rd Jul 2014
It's called a continuity error aka a Film Flub, but last time it came up nobody identified it as having a page here.
FunkySquid
08:40:19 PM 25th Jul 2014
So should I launch one? Its only a minor detail that changes.
randomsurfer
07:36:24 AM 26th Jul 2014
I could see this as one of those exampleless "this only defines the term" pages; but it would be trivia, not a trope.
FunkySquid
10:34:10 PM 27th Jul 2014
It's the sort of editing mistakes Cinema Sins mentions. I'm had a look but can't find it. Also, would I set up a trivia page via YKTTW (sorry, I'm new to editing)?
randomsurfer
07:13:37 AM 28th Jul 2014
Any non-work or Creator/ page ought to go through ykttw.

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lucy24
Medium:
07:06:08 AM 28th Jul 2014
.. and when I say "not sure", I mean "all", which isn't listed.

Where's the Copspeak trope hiding? It's got to exist somewhere, but I can't figure out what it would be called.

"my place of employment" = at work "exited the vehicle" = got out of the car "the residence" = my house "stated" = said "verbal altercation" = argument and so on and so on.

Believed by many participants on courtroom TV to be English; that's what makes it a trope rather than just another kind of professional jargon.
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Synchronicity
11:52:37 PM 24th Jul 2014
Bisected8
09:09:47 AM 25th Jul 2014
I don't think any of those are specific to the police. Sesquipedalian Loquaciousness, perhaps?
FunkySquid
10:45:49 PM 27th Jul 2014
edited by FunkySquid
You're thinking of Busman's Vocabulary.
randomsurfer
07:06:08 AM 28th Jul 2014
edited by randomsurfer
Spock Speak actually specifically mentions "Cop Speak," at least in the real life section. It's just that there are very few fictional examples listed.

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MarqFJA
Medium:
10:32:31 PM 27th Jul 2014
What's the trope for when a creature that is normally an element of the fantasy and/or supernatural genres is portrayed in a Magiteky way? E.g. a Biblical angel of this sort may have mechanical wings of shiny metal, high tech-looking armor and weapons (perhaps even a scifi Laser Blade instead of a traditional solid sword), and scifi-style Tron Lines all over their body, armor and weapons, or both.
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FunkySquid
08:42:18 PM 25th Jul 2014
DAN004
09:21:35 PM 25th Jul 2014
MarqFJA
05:14:31 PM 27th Jul 2014
@Funky Squid: Anachronism Stew would only apply if the anachronism in question is in the setting/environment — e.g. if the futuristically-armored angels in question where depicted in any of the time periods in which many of the Bible's events took place.

@DAN004: That's... rather generic.
AHI-3000
05:35:37 PM 27th Jul 2014
AnoBakaDesu
06:42:21 PM 27th Jul 2014
MarqFJA
06:44:42 PM 27th Jul 2014
@AHI-3000: Science Fantasy is about works and their settings, as it's a genre. Also, you can have Science Fantasy without mixing both scifi and fantasy elements in any single character or group(s) of characters, so Science Fantasy at best would serve as a supertrope to the seemingly missing trope that I'm seeking.

DAN004
08:02:41 PM 27th Jul 2014
FuzzyWulfe
10:32:31 PM 27th Jul 2014

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CaliforniaDave
Medium: Anime
10:13:12 PM 27th Jul 2014
Which trope would this be? The example I'm giving is from MacGyver, but it fits in Anime as well:

In the episode "Hearts Of Steel", Lisa (Mayim Bialik) is thought to have been kidnapped. The father calls in Mac - he had met the family earlier in the season. When Lisa shows up at the house and sees MacGyver, she says his name...and if this were Anime, you'd see the hearts in her eyes as she said it.

What would this be?
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DAN004
10:13:12 PM 27th Jul 2014

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Razareil
Medium:
09:36:54 PM 27th Jul 2014
Is there a trope for when the protagonists discover that the aliens/monsters/whatever they've been fighting are actually people just like them? (As in the same species, when they thought it was a different species.) I was thinking of a major spoiler in Attack on Titan, but the closest thing I could find was Was Once a Man, and I'm not talking so much about transformation as the plot twist of the reveal. In a very simple case, it could even be a supposed alien removing their spacesuit helmet.
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Synchronicity
09:36:54 PM 27th Jul 2014

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MarqFJA
Medium:
06:46:05 PM 27th Jul 2014
edited by MarqFJA
What's the trope for an eye version of Celestial Body — i.e. the eyes are either partially (as in, their irises and pupils) or entirely comprised of a starry "skyscape"?

Example: this character from HeartCatch Pretty Cure!.
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Synchronicity
07:00:09 PM 24th Jul 2014
MarqFJA
06:40:29 AM 25th Jul 2014
edited by MarqFJA
So no subtrope for this specific concept exists?
Synchronicity
06:28:26 PM 25th Jul 2014
Doesn't look like it.
MarqFJA
06:42:53 PM 25th Jul 2014
For the record, Monochromatic Eyes contains a handful of examples of this "starfield eyes" design, though I'm not sure if they do fit that trope (depends on how literally/strictly we define "monochromatic" as).
superkeijikun
07:44:51 PM 25th Jul 2014
It may overlap with Magical Eye.
superkeijikun
07:44:51 PM 25th Jul 2014
It may overlap with Magical Eye.
MarqFJA
05:03:55 PM 27th Jul 2014
Magical Eye is when the eye(s) have supernatural power of some sort, which does not necessarily require a strangeness in the appearance of said eye(s).
DAN004
06:02:20 PM 27th Jul 2014
It's still Exotic Eye Designs
MarqFJA
06:46:05 PM 27th Jul 2014
I know, and I didn't dispute that. It still seems like it deserves its own trope, though; maybe I'll make one later when I finish the ones I'm juggling in YKTTW, provided that no one else beats me to it.

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tash2
Medium:
06:38:40 PM 27th Jul 2014
The one where the strongest enemy, for all intents and purposes, is defeated long before the end of the work and every villain who comes afterward is stuck in his shadow.
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Freezer
02:15:46 PM 27th Jul 2014
tash2
02:41:25 PM 27th Jul 2014
edited by tash2
It wasn't just a video game thing. It's when the first (or an early) big bad gets defeated at some point and everything afterward is kind of the fallout from his defeat. Either trying to undo the damage he caused, stopping whatever chain of events he set in motion before he died, or just dealing with new villains trying to take the opportunity to rise to power now that he's gone (and even they admit that he was better than they were). He's dealt with early, but still very much the biggest enemy of the work.

I remember adding an entry to it several years ago.
randomsurfer
04:25:00 PM 27th Jul 2014
The Remnant? Like in Return of the Jedi the Emperor is killed and therefore the Empire is defeated, but in the Expanded Universe novels the war continues for some time because, just 'cause you kill the head of the empire doesn't mean the empire suddenly ceases to exist.
AnoBakaDesu
06:38:40 PM 27th Jul 2014

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arisboch
Medium:
06:09:51 PM 27th Jul 2014
What's the trope, when e.g. a movie was made in 2010 and the WTC is still there?
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Daakun
01:28:09 PM 24th Jul 2014
arisboch
03:15:16 PM 24th Jul 2014
That's the other way around.
randomsurfer
03:32:17 PM 24th Jul 2014
edited by randomsurfer
I gather that the work doesn't take place before September 2001 or in an Alternate History?
Larkmarn
06:59:18 AM 25th Jul 2014
edited by Larkmarn
History Marches On.

EDIT, I misread. Please ignore.
eroock
06:09:51 PM 27th Jul 2014
The opposite of Present Day Past

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superkeijikun
Medium:
05:56:27 PM 27th Jul 2014
'Tis a trope that's universal amongst media. Not sure if it's the same as Anything But That!, but related.

Basically, character A dies. Character B falls to his knees and cries "No, not him!"
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FunkySquid
08:37:36 PM 25th Jul 2014
Big NO ...?
superkeijikun
12:04:25 PM 26th Jul 2014
I'm not sure that's it, though it's also related.
eroock
05:56:27 PM 27th Jul 2014
You might want to look for or add it to Other Stock Phrases

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eroock
Medium:
05:02:12 PM 27th Jul 2014
Sometimes there is a quick montage of certain actions, where frames are stitched together in short sequence. Example would be the drug fixing sequences in Requiem for a Dream (NSFW!). Same technique is used in Guy Richie's Snatch as a travel montage of the Russian gangster Boris. I didn't see this effect mentioned in the tropes part of either movie.
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randomsurfer
04:26:24 PM 27th Jul 2014
Montages is the index of montages, did you check those out? There is specifically a Travel Montage trope.
eroock
05:02:12 PM 27th Jul 2014
edited by eroock
Apparently, the correct term is Fast Cutting. We don't seem to have this on here. The closest I could find was Travel Montage, Time-Compression Montage and Blipvert.

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Elfkaiser
Medium:
04:41:22 PM 27th Jul 2014
edited by Elfkaiser
Is there a specific trope about children who have traits that contrast their parents and vice versa?

Think Sibling Yin-Yang, however instead of it being between siblings, it's between a parent and child. Also somewhat similar also to Contrasting Sequel Main Character except the contrasting characters maybe found in the same work at the same time, and they may not be main characters. May lead to Antagonist Offspring if the contrast is too much.

Basically a Foil trope but specifically about parents and their children.

Examples:

  • In Big Bully, there are two cases. David is a nerdy guy who was bullied when he was younger, while his son is the typical 90's cool kid but a bully. Roscoe is a big guy who bullied David in the past, while Roscoe's son is a bit of a nerd and somewhat ironically is the kid David's son bullies.
  • In Nanatsu No Taizai, Dreyfus is an ambitious Well-Intentioned Extremist Knight Templar who won't let anything stand in his way, even going as far as to stage a coup against his king. Dreyfus' son Griamor is a loyal and devoted knight who has sworn to protect one of the kingdom's princesses. Their contrast is even highlighted by their powers. Dreyfus' power is to literally blast through anything in his way. Griamor's a Barrier Warrior. Despite their contrasts though, Dreyfus is a "Well Done, Dad" Guy who cares deeply for his son.
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Bisected8
08:35:07 AM 27th Jul 2014
The closest I can think of is an Inverted Trope of Generation Xerox.

Evil Parents Want Good Kids seems close, but much narrower than what you're after.
Synchronicity
08:40:37 AM 27th Jul 2014
Also Wacky Parent, Serious Child.

I think Inverted Generation Xerox works as well, but if there are enough examples I can see it becoming its own trope.
Elfkaiser
09:22:27 AM 27th Jul 2014
edited by Elfkaiser
Maybe some other examples

  • In One Piece, Wapol's father was renowned in life as a benevolent king who was loved by his subjects. Wapol is a tyrant who not only abused his power but abandoned his people at the first sign of trouble. He is very much hated by his people that immediately armed themselves when he shows his ugly mug again.
  • The main characters of JoJo's Bizarre Adventure that are the children of a previous main character counts. I haven't yet read anything about them other than what's written in Tv Tropes but they kinda count. The grandparent/grandson characters on the other hand may count to an extent. Jonathan was a standard British boy scout gentleman hero. Jonathan's grandson Joseph was a Crazy Awesome British American who was anything but a gentlemen. Joseph's grandson Jotaro was a Japanese delinquent who was not only built like a brick wall but also had a personality of one.
  • In Avatar and Legend Of Korra. Aang was a happy go lucky kid in the first series. Aang's son Tenzin is a stern mentor who isn't as happy go lucky as his father was. Toph was a independent girl who ran away from a strict home. Toph's daughter Lin is Da Chief who decided to follow in her mother's footsteps as a cop despite Toph's wishes. The Earth King was a Nice Guy animal lover but was a puppet king in the first series. The Earth King's daughter is a bitch and dictator who's allergic to animals but supposedly enjoys eating them.
Bisected8
11:55:44 AM 27th Jul 2014
edited by Bisected8
^ Don't forget that each reincarnation of the Avatar is implied to be a foil to the next (Rouko was a serious commanding figure, Aang was more light hearted and gentle, Korra is Hot-Blooded...).

It looks like a case of a missing supertrope; it might be worth taking to YKTTW.
randomsurfer
04:35:27 PM 27th Jul 2014
Archnemesis Dad or Antagonistic Offspring depending on which generation is good and which is bad.
DAN004
04:41:22 PM 27th Jul 2014
^ they don't have to be antagonistic or contrasting in morality though. Just contrasting in general.

Yeah, ykttw plz.

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theshadysalesman
Medium:
04:40:00 PM 27th Jul 2014
If this one exists, it may be related to OOC Moment. It's when a performer gets a gig with a theme that goes completely against their style or ideals, forcing them to sell out, usually as a result of a crappy agent, or of really needing the money. An example would be when Ice Cube accidentally got booked for a D&D audiobook, or in Corey in the House, when they had to play a polka gig
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justanotherrandomlurker
11:07:37 AM 27th Jul 2014
Synchronicity
11:24:13 AM 27th Jul 2014
randomsurfer
04:38:44 PM 27th Jul 2014
Money, Dear Boy for the "needing the money" version.
DAN004
04:40:00 PM 27th Jul 2014

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LordHerobrine
Medium:
04:18:03 PM 27th Jul 2014
Do we have a trope where a character suddenly shifts the mood by uttering a self-deprecating one liner?

Ex: "No, It's fine. They can go on without me. *looks down with the textbook anime sadness facial expression* It's not like I'll be missed or anything."
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Scorpion451
10:06:50 PM 26th Jul 2014
There's Wham Line and Mood Whiplash...
LordHerobrine
11:05:32 PM 26th Jul 2014
Well... It is not exactly a Wham Line since these self-deprecating one liners are sometimes expected, and they don't radically alter the plot, just a possible scene. They may be important later, but at that scene, all it does is shift the mood. Self D one liners CAN be Wham Line, but not always.

It does cause Mood Whiplash, and I was actually looking at that before I posted. It's different from that either because it's one line uttered that either someone or the audience hears that whips the mood around.

A good example would be in the anime No Game, No Life, where in a certain episode, Sora remarked that in the utopian world where everything is a game, this line.

"When it comes to war and killing, we have far more expertise than you do."

It is said with a sort of self-deprecating undertone where the fact is sad but true. There's others too that I'm not thinking off at the present.

Is this unique enough from both Wham Line and Mood Whiplash to be trope able? I can think of many examples for it.
Scorpion451
08:01:11 AM 27th Jul 2014
edited by Scorpion451
Did some more poking around: there's also Heroic Self-Deprecation, Out-of-Character Moment, OOC Is Serious Business, and Badass Boast (that specific No Game, No Life example definitely falls under one of the last two) which can cause or overlap with what you're describing, but haven't found anything that specifically covers a one liner that causes mood whiplash. You might be able to cobble together a YKTTW out of this...maybe call it One Liner Whiplash?

Potential related tropes to look at if you're wanting to start one for this: Think Nothing of It, The Eeyore, Deadpan Snarker, The Snark Knight, Sour Supporter, and Wangst.
LordHerobrine
03:30:28 PM 27th Jul 2014
Can you combine tropes and get more specific like that? Mood Whiplash combined with a One-Liner.

I suppose I can sub-trope it from a Wham Line.. On the other hand, I did find Self-Deprecation.

I can sub-trope it under Self-Deprecation as a one-liner, but I think that falls under Tropes that are more specific... which doesn't work, last time I checked.
randomsurfer
04:18:03 PM 27th Jul 2014
No Game No Life example sounds like Blasé Boast.

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sunlitgarden
Medium:
02:59:57 PM 27th Jul 2014
edited by sunlitgarden
I'm looking for a trope where a character thinks they are going to get in trouble, but they actually end up being rewarded because what they did demonstrated useful skills.

Example: in the first Harry Potter book, Harry thinks he is going to be reprimanded by McGonagall for riding the broom before he was supposed to, but instead ended up being offered a spot on the Quidditch team because he did so well at catching the Remembrall.
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Bisected8
01:56:36 PM 27th Jul 2014
edited by Bisected8
eroock
02:59:57 PM 27th Jul 2014

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RabidTanker
Medium:
08:58:50 AM 27th Jul 2014
edited by RabidTanker
I have an few, what's the trope for an fire-breathing T-Rex (i.e. Grimlock) in a Transformers game; being the only female in a given faction: 5 robots combining into an larger, more powerful being; the developers getting a character's model wrong, and featuring an charcter that's supposed to be dead in a another medium? A.I. units ignoring the player's traps?
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Pyrentis
03:14:11 PM 24th Jul 2014
edited by Pyrentis
What exactly are you looking for in the first one? Would it be Ninja Pirate Zombie Robot? As for the others, listed below:

3: Combining Mecha.

6: The Computer Is a Cheating Bastard.
RabidTanker
03:25:25 PM 24th Jul 2014
edited by RabidTanker
Pyrentis, I'm talking about the Transformers franchise., and what sets Grimlock apart is that his alt-mode is an life-sized fire-breathing T-Rex rather than an car or tank. And about 6, I meant to say that the enemy A.I. completely ignores traps by setting them off rather than disabling them in favor of attacking the player's army. But 3 is right.
DAN004
07:49:33 PM 24th Jul 2014
Please put each of your questions into separate queries.
Larkmarn
06:58:49 AM 25th Jul 2014
I'm very familiar with Transformers, but I don't... know what exactly you're looking for when it comes to the Grimlock thing.

2: The Smurfette Principle.

3: Combining Mecha.

4: Could you be more specific? Which character do you mean? There's Off Model, but it's not quite right. Do you just mean "a character looks different in this adaptation?" If it's severe then it's You Don't Look Like You.

5: Spared by the Adaptation.

6: Suicidal Overconfidence.
randomsurfer
07:20:34 AM 25th Jul 2014
RabidTanker
03:01:05 PM 26th Jul 2014
edited by RabidTanker
Dinosaurs Are Dragons could work in this case but I need another trope with 1. Note that he's the ONLY Dinobot who appears in the game, despite the rest of his team appearing in the movie. As for 4, in the game I'm YKTT Wing Rise of the Darl Spark is chronologically sandwhiched between War for Cybertron and Fall of Cybertron. In Fall of Cybertron: Megatron's character model remains the same as it did in War for Cybertron until a living city pummeled him to death. The damage was so severe, that Soundwave had to alter his master's appearance in order to revive him. So canonically speaing, he should look more or less the same way as he did in War for Cybertron, rather than using the endgame Fall of Cybertron model. By the way, what's the tropes when the game keeps spamming mook-level enemy reinforcements without notice or when the character crosses an certain point on the map, and the characters executing a unannounced contigency plan? As in Shockwave ordering Soundwave to plant explosives on a monorail to cut off the enemy's escape(this was completely off-screen until Shockwave mentions it.) another example is when Jetfire using Trypticon's weaponry to eliminte a hoarde of mooks from a great distance, and yes his mission wasn't mentioned until Optimus radios him.
Scorpion451
08:58:50 AM 27th Jul 2014
You could say that #1 is a variant on Token Nonhuman or Token Heroic Orc- hes the token non-vehicle. There's also Monster Adventurers and Monster Allies.

And the continuity mismatches as a whole are one big Continuity Snarl, which may be what you've been looking for overall.

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RayAP9
Medium:
08:39:21 AM 27th Jul 2014
Looking for something exactly like Badass Boast, except it's someone ELSE saying it about a character. Like when an advocate of the hero brags about what the hero is capable of.

Is this People Sit on Chairs? Or just not trope-y enough to be troped?
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DAN004
01:43:10 AM 27th Jul 2014
It's still Badass Boast as long as it is about boasting. If they describe someone in fear (instead of in pride), it's not a boast.

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kenceo
Medium:
05:55:49 AM 27th Jul 2014
Charles is a sorcerer which create a doll to look like Bob so that he can control Bob.(Bob will feel pain if Charles poke the doll).What do you call this doll?
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Bisected8
05:55:49 AM 27th Jul 2014
edited by Bisected8

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IuraCivium
Medium:
10:07:42 PM 26th Jul 2014
I'm searching here before I do a YKTTW—is there a trope wherein someone actually gives a good answer to an Armor-Piercing Question? If not I'd like to start a YKTTW for Mortar Proof Answer.
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DAN004
08:42:56 PM 22nd Jul 2014
Armor Piercing Answer (still in ykttw)
phalanx
08:47:07 PM 22nd Jul 2014
edited by phalanx
There's Armor Piercing Answer

EDIT: Nevermind
IuraCivium
11:37:58 AM 26th Jul 2014
Thanks, guys.
Scorpion451
10:07:42 PM 26th Jul 2014
edited by Scorpion451
There's Shut Up, Hannibal!, which covers some of those situations.

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Chabal2
Medium:
10:03:59 PM 26th Jul 2014
A gag where someone gets handed a modern version of their current tool, but use it the way they used the old one with much less efficiency (i.e. giving a woodcutter a chainsaw which he drags back and forth across the log, giving a medieval warrior a rifle with which he clubs things, etc.).
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Bisected8
08:59:36 AM 25th Jul 2014
Chabal2
09:51:50 AM 26th Jul 2014
edited by Chabal2
Something like that, although more about not being used to the new one instead of Rule of Cool.

The specific instance I'm looking to trope is a guy flicking his e-cigarette away after taking a puff, only to scramble after it as he remembers it's not a cigarette butt.
Bisected8
03:24:53 PM 26th Jul 2014
In that case, I'm stumped (the nearest I can think of is Damn You, Muscle Memory, but that doesn't quite fit).
Scorpion451
10:03:59 PM 26th Jul 2014
edited by Scorpion451
Its a Reflexive Response in a broad sense, but I agree that the closest match its Damn You, Muscle Memory- Tropes Are Flexible.

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SamCurt
Medium: Anime
10:01:53 PM 26th Jul 2014
Currently the following content is listed under Deliberately Bad Example in a work-page, but the differences between that trope and Anti-Role Model was so confusing such that I'm not sure which of these two tropes should this falls into:

[Name] is hired by sports teams because she has zero sportsmanship, and as a result causes the team members to self-reflect teamwork and such.
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Freezer
07:12:03 PM 26th Jul 2014
No reason it can't be both. Tropes Are Flexible.

SamCurt
07:42:44 PM 26th Jul 2014
While of course an example can belong to both, does it actually belong to both?
Scorpion451
10:01:53 PM 26th Jul 2014
I'd say yes.

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AccidentalTroper
Medium:
10:00:30 PM 26th Jul 2014
We have The Perfectionist, but do we have a trope for when a person (who normally may not be a perfectionist) suddenly turns into one when given an otherwise simple task? For example, there's a Barney Miller episode where the cops need to make a porn movie in order to infiltrate a porno ring. They have Harris make the movie, but instead of a simple porno, he makes a well-crafted, plot-heavy movie that happens to contain a sex scene.
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AccidentalTroper
07:25:33 PM 26th Jul 2014
I guess what I'm looking for is not so much a perfectionist as someone who takes a simple task and turns it into something big and complicated.
DAN004
08:36:50 PM 26th Jul 2014
Scorpion451
10:00:30 PM 26th Jul 2014
There's Complexity Addiction, A Simple Plan, and Zany Scheme...first instinct is that it'd be the first one based on the discription.

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