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Lost And Found

You've got this trope sticking in your mind. You can remember the general idea, and maybe an example or two, but you'll be damned if you can remember what the thing's called, and the search function turns up nothing relevant. Ask about it here.
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Lyner
Medium:
11:50:37 PM 28th Nov 2014
edited by Lyner
Is there a trope for "helper clubs"? There are a number of anime/manga with high school clubs built around the task of helping people who come seeking assistance. Examples include MM!, Sket Dance, Yahari Ore no Seishun Love Come wa Machigatteiru, and Okami-San. The specifics of the tasks the club will take, the way they help, and what they ask in return varies, as does the frequency with which tasks are taken; however, in many cases, this becomes a sort of plot factory to churn out new temporary arcs while the main arc progresses.
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DAN004
06:25:13 PM 28th Nov 2014
Lyner
11:14:05 PM 28th Nov 2014
Not exactly. Support groups have all the members helping and supporting other members. This is a school club built around the act of helping individuals who come to the club seeking assistance. This assistance may involve helping the client's club or filling in for sick members, solving minor mysteries, helping a person finish something they're trying to accomplish, etc. In MM, the people who sought help wound up as members of the club, but in most people come in from outside the club to have specific requests granted. That's why it allows for a constant stream of mini-arcs.
DAN004
11:49:40 PM 28th Nov 2014
DAN004
11:50:37 PM 28th Nov 2014

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Lyner
Medium:
10:58:51 PM 28th Nov 2014
Is there a trope for the "Battle Underwear" you see in anime and manga? This is something that comes up all over the place. Even girls who have no intention of being in a situation that would expose their underwear, or who don't even understand the concept, still wear flashy "battle" underwear for a special date.
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Synchronicity
06:53:31 AM 28th Nov 2014
I'm around 95% sure you don't mean Chainmail Bikini, even if that's what "battle underwear" brings to mind.

The closest I can find seems to be Lingerie Scene.
Lyner
07:15:07 AM 28th Nov 2014
Definitely not Chainmail Bikini. Doesn't seem like Lingerie Scene either: the majority of the shows I've seen with "Shoubu Shitagi" (literally duel/battle underwear) the girl either only intends to show the underwear if things go that route or, more often it seems, it's more of a good-luck sort of thing; of course, there are also girls who wear it with the specific intent of ultimately showing it and knocking the boy dead, and there's a relatively frequent tendency for girls who choose to pick out their flashiest pair to end up accidentally flashing them at some point.
DAN004
08:16:02 AM 28th Nov 2014
Lyner
05:03:32 PM 28th Nov 2014
Definitely not. I called it "Battle Underwear" as a rough translation of "Shoubu Shitagi". "Shitagi" means "underwear", and "shoubu" means some manner of duel, showdown or other fight (usually one-on-one). This has nothing to do with actual combat, and if the girl wearing them ends up in a deathmatch, it's purely coincidental. It's the flashy, eye-catching undergarments girls in anime often wear when going out with a crush, no matter how far she intends to go; as I said, it often seems to be more of a good-luck charm for the girls to wear underwear that will knock men for a loop even if they have no intention of letting the boy see them.
DAN004
06:26:31 PM 28th Nov 2014
I don't think we have a trope like it, and I'm.not sure everyone will agree that this is tropable.
Freezer
07:13:43 PM 28th Nov 2014
Sounds like what you describe are specific Panty Shots within a Panty Fighter show.
Lyner
10:58:51 PM 28th Nov 2014
edited by Lyner
Again, no. This has nothing to do with combat, it's more of a rom-com sort of thing. A better term might be "knockout underwear", since the point is wearing something flashy and quick to attract the guy's attention, even if the girl has no intention of letting him see them.

I too will agree that this may not be tropable. It is a funny point frequently used in rom-coms, one that tends to bring out a good bit of embarrassment at some point invariably.

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SolipSchism
Medium:
07:10:42 PM 28th Nov 2014
Bitter:Sweet's song "Dirty Laundry" contains the following couplet:

"I'll light a candle for good luck/Come on, baby—Let's... [heavy breathing] Oooooh~"

It's a Subverted Rhyme Every Occasion, of course, but would it also qualify as a Curse Cut Short?
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Bisected8
12:45:12 PM 26th Nov 2014
The description for Curse Cut Short seems to say that the word has to be cut off, but phrases associated with curses (like "son of a bitch" and "Oh, Crap") count, even if none of the profane part's enunciated.

...so I guess it hinges on if you think "let's fuck" is enough of a stock phrase to count.
eroock
03:59:32 PM 26th Nov 2014
In the mentioned lyrics, the F word is not a curse word but just profanity. I would only list it under Subverted Rhyme Every Occasion which is perfectly fitting here. Why looking for something else?
SolipSchism
07:10:42 PM 28th Nov 2014
^ That seems like an awfully arbitrary distinction. I'm not looking for additional tropes, I just thought it was on the edge of Curse Cut Short.

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Polkaface99
Medium:
06:28:31 PM 28th Nov 2014
Is there a trope covering someone who vomits in response to an extremely stressful experience? It doesn't even have to involve something gory, just mentally overwhelming.
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HeroGal2347
07:49:25 PM 27th Nov 2014
Vomiting Cop would be the closest I can think of without a Wiki Walk.
DAN004
07:52:51 PM 27th Nov 2014
DAN004
07:53:07 PM 27th Nov 2014
DAN004
07:53:19 PM 27th Nov 2014
DAN004
07:53:28 PM 27th Nov 2014
Polkaface99
06:28:31 PM 28th Nov 2014
Okay, thanks!

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Atreides
Medium:
06:21:51 PM 28th Nov 2014
Hyper Audio?

I first noticed this on Battlestar Galactica (Reimagined) and I'm not sure how widespread it is. Basically it's when small sounds which usually would almost go unnoticed are amplified. So (e.g.) you hear the crisp sound of paper being handled, the sound of liquid being poured into a bottle much clearer, louder and crisper than you would in real life. It seems to make everything seem more real and intense.

Also happens a lot in Hot Fuzz, and is related to Mundane Made Awesome.
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SolipSchism
04:14:52 PM 25th Nov 2014
Could be a Downplayed variant on Super Senses or Hyper Awareness, but I've Seen It a Million Times. It's either got a page here, or it should have a page.
DAN004
04:15:02 PM 25th Nov 2014
SolipSchism
04:26:13 PM 25th Nov 2014
edited by SolipSchism
^ Related, I think, but Acoustic License seems to be specifically about characters/audience always being able to hear speech clearly. I don't think it covers ambient noise or sound effects, unless those sound effects would convey information. Thus, hearing Commander Adama crinkle up a sheet of paper dramatically wouldn't count, because it's just for atmosphere and tension within the show; but if Alice is sneaking into Bob's house and he hears her clothing rustle in the living room from all the way upstairs through the ceiling, it might.
DAN004
06:05:42 PM 25th Nov 2014
^ why so specific?

Tropes Are Flexible
MattStriker
06:05:04 AM 26th Nov 2014
I'd call it "Audible Focus".
Scorpion451
07:27:23 AM 26th Nov 2014
Acoustic License is definitely part of this; remember that its part of the Artistic License family, which are intended to cover all instances of non-realistic portrayals of their subject- in this case, sound. The most common form of that is speech, but it would apply here as well. Idea is still that you're getting information by hearing something that you shouldn't be able to.

Two others to look at:
  • The Coconut Effect: standard non-realistic sounds, visuals, etc. that are added to demonstrate that something is happening.
  • Hell Is That Noise: this is your "It seems to make everything seem more real and intense." part.
SolipSchism
08:23:17 AM 26th Nov 2014
edited by SolipSchism
That's what I mean, though; I think Acoustic License is only when information is being conveyed by the sound in question. Not meta information like "This scene is very dramatic" or "Commander Adama is nonverbally expressing his disappointment in Kara Thrace's shenanigans", but concrete information like dialogue, or "There's someone sneaking around in my house". If the enhanced sound just makes the scene feel more dramatic or intense or engrossing, I feel like that should be a separate trope. Acoustic License, to me, is more "I shouldn't be able to hear X, but I can, and that is distinctly important for some concrete reason. If I couldn't hear X, the scene would play out differently."

EDIT: Also it took me a minute to figure out what was meant by that, but Matt Striker raises a very good point.
eroock
04:19:11 PM 26th Nov 2014
Check out Kung-Foley.
Atreides
09:38:46 PM 27th Nov 2014
edited by Atreides
@SolipSchism - exactly.

Kung-Foley is the closest, and covers the Hot Fuzz example quite well. But even this is considered a super-trope of Audible Sharpness, Squeaky Eyes, Whining Light and Knuckle Cracking. I imagine Hyper Audio / Audible Focus would fit under it too. The Battlestar Galactica example doesn't really fit the Kung-Foley description that well though.

Please add some more examples. If they are numerous, I'll open a KYTTW. Otherwise if there are only a couple I'll just add them to Kung-Foley, and maybe tweak the description a bit.
DAN004
12:02:40 AM 28th Nov 2014
How would all of them relate to Unsound Effect?
nrjxll
06:21:51 PM 28th Nov 2014
They wouldn't. It's a completely different trope.

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eroock
Medium:
04:19:53 PM 28th Nov 2014
Do we have an index for cuts?

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Bisected8
04:19:53 PM 28th Nov 2014

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Chabal2
Medium:
10:28:32 AM 28th Nov 2014
Is there a trope for a particular type of shooting pose, where the victim is kneeling and the shooter is behind him with his arm fully extended (often with Dramatic Gun Cock)? Basically the second panel of this Penny Arcade. And another where the shooter brings his arm up with his elbow bent, unbends it, and then shoots.
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Biagio
Medium:
08:20:10 AM 28th Nov 2014
I was looking for a trope about a situation that has a simple explaination but is actually more complicated. In DA:I

Inquisitor: Why did you throw turnips in the fire/ steal daggers to hide in a barrel Cole:They dont smell the same if i don/theyre safer there.

Later Overheard:As he was dying he smiled said he could smell his mothers turnip stew/ that templar got so angry he reached to his belt I swear he would have pulled a dagger on the other man a good thing he couldnt find it or we would have had more the jusyt nbloody nose to deal with.
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Daefaroth
04:33:32 AM 25th Nov 2014
I have been staring at this for a bit and I don't really know what you are asking.

1) Try not to use unclear acronyms. I had to google to figure out you meant Dragon Age :Inquisition

2) Can you explain what is happening in the two situations rather than just the dialog. Try to seperate the two examples out rather than mashing them together. Is there any in game explanation as to why Cole actually did those things? Is this just lying to the police or being evasive to the police?

randomsurfer
08:28:52 AM 26th Nov 2014
I agree in with Daefaroth insofar as being clearer...but Brick Joke and/or Chekhov's Gun?
Biagio
01:51:30 AM 27th Nov 2014
Got a little farther and when you confront him about the domino effect of his actions he reveals its intentional. he left plums to draw flies for spiders to eat is the first half of explaination after overhearing NPC talk you add that healers need spider webs to close wounds. Its not quite Xanatos i dont think but seemingly eccentric actions having a higher purpose.
Daefaroth
02:47:18 AM 27th Nov 2014
Most of that didn't help at all...Working off this; "seemingly eccentric actions having a higher purpose" May be Obfuscating Insanity. Like in Hamlet. Intentionally acting in bizarre possibly insane ways in order to keep your opponents confused and off balance.
Biagio
04:11:21 AM 28th Nov 2014
Orchestrating chain reactions for a higher purpose but (like me apparently) explaining it poorly. alternatively being so weird that actions make perfect sense to a character but they assume it makes sense to everyone so they forget to explain.
DAN004
08:20:10 AM 28th Nov 2014

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GrigorII
Medium:
08:19:13 AM 28th Nov 2014
The Big Damn Hero has arrived. But, one moment before we see him, we see an attack that can only be done by him, as his "signature arrival". For example, if a fight in Marvel Comics is interrupted by a flying hammer, or by a red, white and blue shield, you can be very sure of who is about to show up the next page.

Ususally used to build up tension when the arrival of that character was not expected. Bonus point if at that point the character is supposed to be dead, powerless, or otherwise unable to join the fight.
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Bisected8
05:47:38 AM 28th Nov 2014
Dynamic Entry covers the attack part (Fighting Fingerprint or Iconic Item might cover the recognisable attack part).
DAN004
08:19:13 AM 28th Nov 2014
Also Twang Hello.

BTW what about whenever Proto Man in Mega Man makes an entry, a whistle sound always plays before it?

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DAN004
Medium:
08:17:24 AM 28th Nov 2014
Do we have a trope of someone who underwent a Baleful Polymorph coming to terms with their new form that they don't wanna change back? (The youngest son in Brother Bear for one)

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Synchronicity
06:56:22 AM 28th Nov 2014
DAN004
08:17:24 AM 28th Nov 2014
Isn't that trope confined to places? Or Tropes Are Flexible?

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Lyner
Medium:
04:46:09 AM 28th Nov 2014
Is there a trope for the biter? There've been a number of characters in anime/manga who show their affection, anger, frustration, etc. by chomping hard on the hero; especially his head. This happens with Index from A Certain Magical Index, the club president from GJ-bu, Tsumiki from Acchi Kocchi, and more.
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DAN004
09:01:27 PM 27th Nov 2014
Never heard that kind of thing before
Lyner
04:46:09 AM 28th Nov 2014
It's been happening a lot in anime lately. Rather than tsunderes beating the crap out of a boy, several (particularly in the so-called "Wolf Girl" sub-category) have taken to biting him, hard, wherever they can get those Cute Little Fangs. The head seems to be a favorite. Maybe I'll do a YKTTW if there's nothing similar.

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wrm5
Medium: Videogame
02:59:51 AM 28th Nov 2014
edited by wrm5
I was wondering if there's a trope for this. Also, apologizing in advance if this is confusing, I'll try to explain as best I can.

So, everyone knows that in any video game that allows you to loot corpses, you loot corpses. But in Eldritch that gets played with: when you loot a corpse it fades out and a new enemy spawns somewhere in the level. New enemies ONLY spawn when you loot a corpse (otherwise the corpse just sits there forever waiting to be looted) which forces you to think about whether it's worth looting for ammo, keys, etc. or if it would maybe be better to let the enemies stay dead so you don't have to deal with them anymore.

Is there a trope for this sort of "good, but maybe bad" gameplay mechanic that forces you to choose which option is worse?
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DAN004
12:01:06 AM 28th Nov 2014
Are the enemies THAT annoying?
wrm5
02:59:51 AM 28th Nov 2014
They can be, especially in New Game+

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Willbyr
moderator
Medium:
09:32:50 PM 27th Nov 2014
Is it a trope for two completely different things in one work to have the same name? The specific example I have in mind is from Warhammer 40,000, where "Salamander" is either a Space Marine from the Salamanders chapter or a specific tank used by the Imperial Guard, a separate army from the Space Marines.

I already looked up Name's the Same and I don't think that's the right trope.
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DAN004
09:32:50 PM 27th Nov 2014
One Steve Limit, averted

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DAN004
Medium:
09:20:46 PM 27th Nov 2014
How does Stepford Smiler and Sad Clown be related to each other?
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Willbyr
moderator
09:20:46 PM 27th Nov 2014
Both are about putting on a facade to cover inner turmoil. The Sad Clown is a jokester, the Stepford Smiler is more about being pleasant, cheery, and appearing to have themselves together in everything they do.

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MeerkatMario
Medium:
09:00:44 PM 27th Nov 2014
edited by MeerkatMario
I'm looking for a trope that goes like this: a character (doesn't matter if it is a human or an animal) wears an open jacket, coat or buttoned shirt and doesn't have nothing underneath it. An example that I found is from Ned's Newt when Newton changes into a few forms; these include a Pirate, a photographer, a shady watch seller or even a doctor.
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MattStriker
04:30:28 PM 16th Nov 2014
Well, in Newton's case it's a classic example of Half-Dressed Cartoon Animal.
MeerkatMario
04:50:43 PM 16th Nov 2014
I guess. Another example is at one point in the intro of Sabrina: The Animated Series where Sabrina, Salem and Harvey fly past a group of pirates (again?) and most of them wear coats and nothing underneath. One of the few exceptions to this was the captain of the group himself.
MeerkatMario
05:25:21 PM 20th Nov 2014
Hello? Is anyone responding?
Synchronicity
05:58:15 PM 20th Nov 2014
The pirates do wear pants.

And I don't think half-nakedness is really tropable, aside from when it's used as fanservice (eg. Walking Shirtless Scene).
DAN004
07:36:40 PM 20th Nov 2014
Scorpion451
09:04:00 AM 23rd Nov 2014
edited by Scorpion451
If the outfits are used to convey the idea that these are salty pirates before they utter their first "Arr!", that'd be Dressed to Plunder.

Half-Dressed Cartoon Animal would definitely be the newt one.

Also: patience, meerkat. There's a lot of wiki for us to dig through sometimes, and most of us try not to spend all of our time here. (Don't necessarily succeed, but we try.) X3

@ Synchronicity: things like stock costumes and props are tropable because they are visual indicators of character and story with built in meaning- a person wearing a coat and not wearing a shirt is People Sitting In Chairs, but the No Shirt, Long Jacket look is a trope for the same reason that Spikes of Villainy is a trope. Someone walks out of the shadows wearing a long coat and no shirt, you can assume they are badass, and if they are not it will be a surprise because it defies the pre-loaded meaning somehow.
randomsurfer
08:57:17 PM 24th Nov 2014
IIRC there used to be a trope for this but it got cut as a result of The Second Google Incident. The Trope Namer was some anthropomorphic girl cat from a show I never watched so I don't recall the name, who is naked except she wears a jacket.
DAN004
11:06:30 PM 24th Nov 2014
randomsurfer
08:31:07 AM 26th Nov 2014
edited by randomsurfer
^Nope. It got cut, not renamed. Naked in Mink is being nude while wearing a fur jacket, that one was being furred-but-otherwise-naked (and showing it off!) while wearing an open, non-fur jacket.

EDIT: Like Chip from Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers. Leather jacket, worn open, otherwise naked.
SolipSchism
09:00:06 AM 26th Nov 2014
^ How would a chipmunk wearing a jacket and nothing else not be a Half-Dressed Cartoon Animal?
Synchronicity
09:22:50 AM 26th Nov 2014
Apologies, I misunderstood and thought OP was talking about nakedness besides the jacket.
randomsurfer
08:30:57 PM 27th Nov 2014
^^Dale, who wears a buttoned-up Hawaiian Shirt and no pants, is half dressed. Chip, who wears his coat open, would be...IDK, less than half dressed. He's flashing us all the time.
DAN004
09:00:43 PM 27th Nov 2014

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smalltime
Medium:
07:54:43 PM 27th Nov 2014
Is there a trope for when a character reads out the title?

I don't mean a Title Drop. I mean actually reading the title out loud as it appears on screen.
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Scorpion451
05:02:50 PM 27th Nov 2014
That'd be Medium Awareness.
DAN004
07:53:34 PM 27th Nov 2014
DAN004
07:54:43 PM 27th Nov 2014

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mr.whim
Medium:
11:18:01 AM 27th Nov 2014
edited by mr.whim
Is there something similar to what one might call Tragedy Ensues?

i.e. there's an action, and this is shorthand for saying that a lot of bad things happen because of it.

  • Bob sees signs his childhood friend is actually a monster, but refuses to do anything about it because friendship or something. Tragedy Ensues.
  • Alice totally believes that her devil-spawned baby didn't mean to kill twenty people within an hour of being born, so she sends the baby off with the creepy cultists who just want to protect it until it grows up. Tragedy Ensues.
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SolipSchism
09:05:25 AM 26th Nov 2014
Those both sound like a very moral take on Honor Before Reason, possibly with a few shakes of Too Dumb to Live.
SolipSchism
09:25:40 AM 26th Nov 2014
Oh, seconded Horrible Judge of Character and Unwitting Instigator of Doom. Instigator is probably the best fit now that I think about it.
mr.whim
09:46:01 AM 26th Nov 2014
But would any of those apply to, say;

  • Gavrilo Princip assassinates Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria. Tragedy Ensues.
SolipSchism
10:04:52 AM 26th Nov 2014
edited by SolipSchism
I... what? Wouldn't that just be cause and effect? I mean, there's Tragedy, but that hardly sounds like what you want. I don't think Bad Things Happening As A Result Of Someone Doing Something is very tropeworthy...

EDIT: Well, now that I think of it, you might take a look at Spanner in the Works for cases where someone unwittingly ruins a plan just by being incompetent, stupid, or otherwise stumbling into/through the situation.

You might also want For Want of a Nail, in which a seemingly minor problem or omission has huge consequences later on, but the situations you're describing don't seem like they would quite fit ("not murdering a child" sounds a little too significant to be the nail).

Maybe try It Began with a Twist of Fate, in which the main character only became involved in the main storyline due to an unlikely coincidence or chance encounter.

I'm really reaching here, but maybe these will help.
mr.whim
10:28:23 AM 26th Nov 2014
edited by mr.whim
Mmm, those seem perfectly suitable. I dunno, I think where I'm coming from is that we have Hilarity Ensues, Reality Ensues, Coitus Ensues, etc, as what is essentially viable shorthand to "The previous actions resulted in X ensuing", but not one for "bad stuff happens". Though I guess just "Tragedy Ensues" is all that needs be said.
SolipSchism
10:47:36 AM 26th Nov 2014
edited by SolipSchism
You do raise a good point, but I think the difference here is that those three tropes all have extra baggage that makes them tropes.

  • Hilarity Ensues isn't just Funny Things Happen, or even Funny Things Happen As A Result Of Something; it's "X happens, and you would expect serious consequences, but instead, Hilarity Ensues."
    • For example, I get paralyzed from the waist down. You'd expect that to lead into a terribly depressing story, but instead, I go on wacky misadventures with my new power chair and play pranks on people.
  • Reality Ensues is when "X happens, and based on the conventions of the genre, you'd expect lighthearted or unrealistic results, but instead, Reality Ensues."
    • For example, a man is foreshadowed to be superhuman, and at one point in the story, he falls off a roof. You'd expect that to be the point where his power is suddenly revealed and he flies away safely... but instead he slams into the pavement and dies instantly and gruesomely.
  • Coitus Ensues is for when characters have sex in a way that seems unnecessary for the plot, jarring, shoehorned-in, or otherwise out-of-place or sudden. This can be fairly YMMV, and to be perfectly honest, you could make a pretty good case for almost any instance of fictional sex being an example of Coitus Ensues, but the fact remains that you'd have to actually make the argument and explain how it fits; fictional sex by itself isn't necessarily Coitus Ensues.
    • For example, we spend 100 hours of totally par-for-the-course gameplay jetting around the continent in an attempt to collect the 99 Plot Coupons, and just before we go to the final dungeon, we spend the night in the nearest inn... and The Hero and The Chick have emotional, weepy sex.

I think for Tragedy Ensues to be a thing, it would need to be more than just Bad Things Happen. It could be something like "X happens, and you would expect it to be harmless or insignificant, but in fact Tragedy Ensues", but that kind of sounds like it's just a pastiche of Reality Ensues and For Want of a Nail.
Daefaroth
09:42:43 PM 26th Nov 2014
edited by Daefaroth
This sounds like things going From Bad to Worse. Its redirect of It Got Worse can be used much like the ensues tropes.

  • Bob sees signs his childhood friend is actually a monster, but refuses to do anything about it because friendship or something. It Got Worse.

  • Alice totally believes that her devil-spawned baby didn't mean to kill twenty people within an hour of being born, so she sends the baby off with the creepy cultists who just want to protect it until it grows up. It Got Worse.

Also see Finagle's Law & Murphy's Law
DAN004
03:08:54 AM 27th Nov 2014
So shall I turn Tragedy Ensues into a redirect to From Bad to Worse?
Daefaroth
04:41:34 AM 27th Nov 2014
It depends on exactly what you are looking for in the trope. From Bad to Worse is when a bad situation gets worse.

If you are looking for what Solipschism says about an apparently harmless situation that suddenly turns tragic (like in Half Baked when a stoned character feeds a horse junk food and it turns out the horse is diabetic and dies, or the running joke of everyone dying randomly in A Million Ways to Die in the West) then that could be a separate trope. But the examples in the original post sound a lot like From Bad to Worse rather than Tragedy Ensues.

Scorpion451
07:10:37 AM 27th Nov 2014
edited by Scorpion451
I'd call even the Archduke assassination example Unwitting Instigator of Doom- he and his group just wanted to assassinate a leader they didn't like as a political statement, and the country itself wasn't even all that upset about it. No one could have ever predicted that "Did you hear about Archduke whats-his-name getting shot?" "Yep. Sad. What's the soup today?" to be the trigger of a long chain of events that ended with a large chunk of the planet at war.
nrjxll
11:18:01 AM 27th Nov 2014
"So shall I turn Tragedy Ensues into a redirect to From Bad to Worse?"

Emphatically no. People aren't really supposed to be using Hilarity Ensues and the like as "shorthand" in the first place; it's pseudo-sinkholing. We don't need yet another phrase like that.

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MatthewSaint
Medium:
07:59:00 AM 27th Nov 2014
Is there a trope for meaningful license plate on vehicles? I recently saw a movie where three license plates referenced different Bible verses that had hints as to what the characters true personalities are. I believe The Matrix got in on the Bible reference license plate as well. While it may be a trope in itself, I'm not just limiting it to Biblical references.

For example, if a character was driving a car with the license plate 1AG0, Shakespeare savvy viewers might have cause not to trust anything they say.

Vanity License Plate may cover an instance or two of it, but it does not encompass the true idea that I'm seeking.
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DAN004
04:33:28 PM 26th Nov 2014
Would Meaningful Name cover it enough?
DAN004
04:33:51 PM 26th Nov 2014
Would Meaningful Name cover it enough?
Scorpion451
07:59:00 AM 27th Nov 2014
edited by Scorpion451
It's a type of Genius Bonus and Easter Egg... not sure there's anything more specific than that.

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ConnorGorden
Medium:
07:45:12 AM 27th Nov 2014
Is there a trope where a sympathetic villian that every character hated because they were perceived as the bad guy, but were just performing neccessary evil, is so sick with their lot in life that they are happy to see the the heroes come to dispose of them?
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MattStriker
08:54:24 PM 26th Nov 2014
That's...very specific. Odds are there won't be anything that exactly covers this particular set of circumstances.
ConnorGorden
09:01:14 PM 26th Nov 2014
edited by ConnorGorden
A character being neccessary evil for too long, and being tired of it?

Also, Dan, Scorpion, and Schism tend to step up when I break out the tough ones. ( love you guys)
Daefaroth
09:03:51 PM 26th Nov 2014
Probably Necessarily Evil is the best general trope. And then add Designated Villain on top of it.
ConnorGorden
09:39:45 PM 26th Nov 2014
No because I'm looking for a villian that is weighed down by being the neccessary evil. ( thanks though, for the effort :) )
Daefaroth
10:03:34 PM 26th Nov 2014
edited by Daefaroth
Did you read the first paragraph of Necessary Evil?

A villain may believe that the Ends (involving a Utopia or the survival of the species) justify the Means, but has in no way lost his conscience, or otherwise had a Heel Realization during his deluded time. He knows full well that what he's doing is evil and that heroes may try to bring him to justice for his crimes. He may in fact be counting on it, feeling it to be a just punishment for what he feels he must do. He may bear the heroes no ill will, and may instead commend them for trying to stop him.
DAN004
03:08:02 AM 27th Nov 2014
" but were just performing neccessary evil, is so sick with their lot in life that they are happy to see the the heroes come to dispose of them?"

Necessary Evil, Trapped In Villainy, Suicide by Cop
Scorpion451
07:45:12 AM 27th Nov 2014
edited by Scorpion451
Might be looking for Tragic Villain or Pyrrhic Villainy (those took some digging to find, need more wicks)-

Tragic Villain - They know they are evil, but feel they have no choice but to continue- or may actually be incapable of stopping themselves due to compulsion or circumstances (that part would be Dan's suggestion of Trapped In Villainy). Specifically mentions the "Death Seeker out of remorse" aspect.

Pyrrhic Villainy - Being Evil Sucks even if its necessary evil. And sometimes the people who hate a Karma Houdini the most are themselves. Related to No Place for Me There.

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Lenoxus
Medium: Film
06:53:03 AM 27th Nov 2014
When someone's plan relies on the opposition completely vacating the premises, often in response to a trick or lure. For example, how Lex Luthor manages to access a missile convoy in the original Superman. Might involve getting all of them into some other location, such as the way Kirk defeats the Klingons at the end of The Search For Spock. In general, the point is that groups (such as mooks) will act en masse, as though there are no specialized members whose job is to stay put.
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Scorpion451
06:53:03 AM 27th Nov 2014
Hmm. The blanket trope is We Need a Distraction- this is just playing that on a large scale as part of a gambit. On the gambit there's a few this one could be: Kansas City Shuffle is the usual one, but it could also be a Batman Gambit, or even a Xanatos Gambit if they don't care whether the distraction or the sneak attack succeed, so long as one of them does.

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nirao01
Medium:
11:34:35 PM 26th Nov 2014
edited by nirao01
Is there a title trope referring to events taking place in the story?
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Freezer
10:48:33 PM 21st Nov 2014
Sidestories? Events only referred to? Parallel storylines? Could you narrow your question a bit?
Daefaroth
01:20:27 AM 22nd Nov 2014
I am going to shoot from the hip and guess you mean In Which a Trope Is Described where the title summarizes the plot or episode. Also see Exactly What It Says on the Tin for when it literally is the majority of the plot in one phrase.
nirao01
04:48:56 AM 22nd Nov 2014
The title of the work referring to an event that will take or is taking place within the story (e.g. The Hunger Games, How I Met Your Mother, The Exorcism of Emily Rose, etc.).
DAN004
03:35:13 PM 22nd Nov 2014
Probably yes, EWISOTT
nirao01
09:40:09 AM 26th Nov 2014
Well, EWISOTT applies to any trope in general. What I'm looking for is a specific title trope like the setting of the work is for The Place, Job Title is for the main character's work, etc.
mr.whim
09:50:08 AM 26th Nov 2014
SolipSchism
10:01:06 AM 26th Nov 2014
edited by SolipSchism
It's probably Exactly What It Says on the Tin.

EWISOTT is not a Trope Trope, it is a Title Trope/Naming Convention that applies any time a work's title serves as a pretty effective summary of the work itself. In general, if you can say "Work X is about Y," and X=Y, then it's Exactly What It Says on the Tin. Snakes on a Plane is about Snakes on a Plane. The Exorcism of Emily Rose is about Emily Rose being exorcised. How I Met Your Mother is about How The Narrator Met The Listeners' Mother. The Hunger Games is a pretty mild example because it's cryptic to those who aren't familiar with the work, but it's about an event known as The Hunger Games.

In Which a Trope Is Described is a subtrope of Exactly What It Says on the Tin, in which a work is Exactly What It Says on the Tin, but "What it Says on the Tin" is written in an archaic or flowery style.

Edited to fix red links due to my failure at life.
nirao01
11:34:35 PM 26th Nov 2014
OK, I guess it is EWISOTT. Thanks.

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bennusmagnus
Medium:
08:55:19 PM 26th Nov 2014
Do we have a trope where a character has a humorous name like Dr.Billyou or any of the examples shown here?
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MattStriker
08:55:19 PM 26th Nov 2014

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justanotherrandomlurker
Medium:
08:16:41 PM 26th Nov 2014
Is there anything that covers occasions where a Creator (or part of the creative team) leaves a Long Runner, but eventually returns much later on?
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DAN004
04:38:26 PM 26th Nov 2014
justanotherrandomlurker
05:13:25 PM 26th Nov 2014
I'm not talking about Darrins, I'm talking about writers, producers, directors, etc. Like how Show Runner Larry David left Seinfeld after Season Seven, but then returned to write the Grand Finale.
DAN004
08:16:41 PM 26th Nov 2014
Related then.

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eroock
Medium:
08:16:18 PM 26th Nov 2014
edited by eroock
We have Distinguishing Mark when a birthmark or similar is used to identify a character in-universe. I am looking for a related trope but geared for audience perception. When the plot spans decades and actors replace one another, the transition is more believable when there is some visual cue picked up by the older actor (or younger for flashbacks). This could be Nerd Glasses the character wears throughout his life or a mole or a scar that one can easily connect with the character regardless of their age. I would call it a Character Continuity Cue.
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DAN004
08:16:18 PM 26th Nov 2014
Iconic Item maybe?

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SgtFrog1
Medium:
08:41:54 AM 26th Nov 2014
Do we have a trope for things that seem just sick and wrong? Like we know, subconsciously, we should stay the hell away from it? Even basic pictures like the "biohazard symbol", with its almost menacing curved spikes, gives a sort of subtle fear signal to our brains.

It's not quite Uncanny Valley, since that just applies to faces; this would be more of a supertrope for that.
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BradyLady
11:14:34 PM 23rd Nov 2014
I'd just call it Squick.
Daefaroth
11:18:29 PM 23rd Nov 2014
DAN004
11:20:38 PM 23rd Nov 2014
Charsi
08:28:49 AM 24th Nov 2014
SgtFrog1
10:26:05 AM 24th Nov 2014
Don't Touch It, You Idiot! is pretty close. Squick works, kind of, but I'm looking for more of a "stay away from this area because it's extremely contaminated/insanity-inducing", not a "stay away from this area because your grandparents are having sex in there".
Scorpion451
08:41:54 AM 26th Nov 2014
edited by Scorpion451
My home turf here, concept design. I for sure can tell you that Uncanny Valley isn't just for faces- when people find taxidermy creepy or a poorly drawn pose unsettling but can't explain why, that's the Uncanny Valley. Its also why Evil Is Visceral, and why it's most prominent form is Body Horror.

From a general design perspective, the other related tropes are collected under Obviously Evil. Want to make it clear something is a bad thing? Add Spikes of Villainy, make it black with sickly yellow-green accents, or even better: give it a Sickly Green Glow. Make sure its not too bright of a glow, because Dark Is Evil. Scale-like textures and and claw like structures are nice touches because Reptiles Are Abhorrent to many people.

There was actually even a group that did a study on the most effective ways to do this as warnings to future generations of post-apocalyptic scavengers that a nuclear waste dump was not a good place to set up camp or go hunting for a new motherboard. They found two of the best were Bizarrchitecture and warped asymetric Sinister Geometry. People find staircases to nowhere and twisted monoliths rather disconcerting in real life, apparently.

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GrigorII
Medium:
07:39:38 AM 26th Nov 2014
A part of the story takes place in the future, and we see a lot of weird stuff. That story was made a lot of time ago. The year of the future, that seemed so distant back then, is now here!

For example, Days of Future Past has a dark future set in 2013, and Back to the Future part II visits the future in 2015.
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Daefaroth
06:49:42 AM 25th Nov 2014
SolipSchism
08:51:36 AM 25th Nov 2014
edited by SolipSchism
It could also just be Time Marches On.

EDIT: Or any of the many tropes on that page, most of which could apply depending on your example's context.
randomsurfer
07:39:38 AM 26th Nov 2014

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DAN004
Medium:
07:37:41 AM 26th Nov 2014
Do we have a trope about landscapes that defy physics? Not in "failing to understand physics" way, but more of a feature of a fantastic world. Like a waterfall from the sky or floating islands.
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phalanx
02:27:55 PM 24th Nov 2014
edited by phalanx
The floating islands would be World in the Sky, the trope in general would be Eldritch Location, Bizarrchitecture, or The Wonderland
randomsurfer
08:46:50 PM 24th Nov 2014
Scorpion451
07:37:41 AM 26th Nov 2014
Extreme ones where the whole plane looks like M. C. Escher and Salvador Dali got high together can be World of Chaos.

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Exxolon
Medium: Live Action TV
06:48:37 AM 26th Nov 2014
Do we have a trope for a trio where you have two people who are very different from each other but have things in common with the mutual third person? I'm thinking of Top Gear. Clarkson and May are pretty different from each other but Hammond has things in common with both of them making him the "glue" that holds the team together - he can relate to each of them far more easily than they can to each other and without him to provide that perspective Clarkson & May would probably end up at each others throats a lot more.
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DAN004
08:17:13 PM 25th Nov 2014
It seemed like Red Oni, Blue Oni, and a mediator.

Freudian Trio?
Daefaroth
10:35:45 PM 25th Nov 2014
edited by Daefaroth
Power Trio: "The most common pattern for this is for two members of the group to be each other's Foils, frequently coming into conflict with each other, with the third member of the group acting as the mediator, keeping The Team together and balancing their respective personalities. This is the dynamic that makes the ensemble powerful."

Edit to add: Comic Trio also definitely works, with the three randomly trading off the roles of leader, fool, and only sane man between segments.

Edited again to add: All 3 of the above trio tropes are already listed in the Top Gear tropes pages.
Exxolon
06:48:37 AM 26th Nov 2014
Thanks guys, those are the things I was looking for.

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Lyner
Medium:
05:21:53 AM 26th Nov 2014
Watching a certain series, I've started to wonder if there's a trope for characters whose appearance and speech/behavior are jarringly out of sync, particularly characters who seem innocent but talk extremely vulgar. For example, the series has a girl who looks and acts mostly like a sweet, innocent child. Then she starts talking and spouts out vulgarities, lewd stories and entendre with all the subtlety of a sledgehammer to the nuts.
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Freezer
07:34:56 PM 25th Nov 2014
nrjxll
08:12:37 PM 25th Nov 2014
Looking under Subverted Innocence, this appears to be the somewhat obtusely-named From the Mouths of Babes.
Lyner
05:21:53 AM 26th Nov 2014
Thanks, that seems to fit; although the girl in the series I'm currently watching not so much young as young-looking and young-acting.

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DAN004
Medium:
03:42:43 AM 26th Nov 2014
How would Good Cannot Comprehend Evil and Horrible Judge of Character relate to each other?
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Daefaroth
03:42:43 AM 26th Nov 2014
edited by Daefaroth
Good Cannot Comprehend Evil means that a good character isn't understanding that the villain is doing it For the Evulz. They don't get how someone can be that cruel. But they know that the villain is evil.

Horrible Judge of Character kicks in if the good character doesn't even understand that the villain is evil.

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skybrook
Medium:
03:52:36 PM 25th Nov 2014
An author tried to write a cautionary tale, but never understood that the characters with moral failings have to fail because of their moral failings, not just fail for any old reason, so the moral of the story gets lost. What's that trope?

Sort of like the opposite of a sock puppet. A character who does the opposite of what the author wants, and argues the opposite of what the author thinks is right, for no reason other than to have someone to chastise and punish, sometimes with a veiled threat of the same punishment to the reader. And they do get punished, but without any connection to their moral failings.

Terrible example is from that MLP show where there's no reason denying Pinkie's abilities should make anything more likely to fall on Twilight Sparkle's head. Most stories about Satan would also apply. Frankenstein is supposed to teach you that playing God is wrong, or that it's bad to cheat death, or that science in the absence of judgement has terrible consequences, but in the end all the bad things happen because the doctor was stupid, and the monster was upset that he couldn't get laid. Pinocchio can't make smart decisions because if he did then there would be no story about condemning him for making bad ones. You're supposed to think that disobeying your parents will get you in trouble, but in the end what gets him in trouble is a mysterious magic turning everyone into donkeys.

Using the idiot ball as a cudgel to beat your morals into people?
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Daefaroth
01:38:41 AM 25th Nov 2014
edited by Daefaroth
Check the Strawman Fallacy family of tropes. I think you will find what you are looking for in there. Potentionally an Author Tract
Bisected8
03:27:31 AM 25th Nov 2014
Possibly Clueless Aesop (badly handled moral messages) or Broken Aesop (the story itself contradicts the moral message)?
eroock
03:52:36 PM 25th Nov 2014
Your Pinocchio example actually sounds like Anthropic Principle.

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DAN004
Medium:
08:49:26 AM 25th Nov 2014
How would Allegorical Character and Anthropomorphic Personification relate to each other?
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SolipSchism
08:49:26 AM 25th Nov 2014
edited by SolipSchism
I think an Allegorical Character is more of a meta representation. Like an alcoholic character in a story might be the author's way of representing alcoholism as a whole, but In-Universe they're very much still just a human being. An Anthropomorphic Personification is literally, In-Universe, an abstract concept coalesced into human form (or another form, but most certainly sentient). An avatar of something abstract, if you will.

EDIT: Removed the avatar pothole because that page is more of a disambiguation page than an actual explanation of an avatar.

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SgtFrog1
Medium:
07:38:51 AM 25th Nov 2014
edited by SgtFrog1
Okay, so Alice is naturally talented at something. Like, really talented, partially because of her natural skill, and partially because of practice because this is what she enjoys. However, she constantly puts herself down, either to avoid being torn down due to Tall Poppy Syndrome or just plain old low-self-esteem.

This is perhaps even more infuriating than Inferiority Superiority Complex, its opposite, because whereas the ISC person is at least doing his best effort and damn sure wants you to know about it, the other guy feels like he's "going easy on you", perhaps not even taking this seriously, when how he really feels couldn't be farther. This could be that Alice feels guilty for crushing the competition, but doesn't realize that, due to Don't You Dare Pity Me!, letting the other guy win feels even worse, because he didn't earn it.
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Bisected8
07:38:51 AM 25th Nov 2014
edited by Bisected8
Willfully Weak covers holding yourself back; Afraid of Their Own Strength or I Just Want to Be Normal could cover the motive.

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CompletelyDifferent
Medium:
08:58:54 PM 24th Nov 2014
I'm wondering about whether we have that trope where...well, Character A is about to go into a dangerous situation, and asks Character B to tell another character something- maybe as simple as "I'm sorry" or "I love you". Character B will respond with something akin to, "Why don't you tell them yourself?" Usually has some similar connotations with How Dare You Die on Me! and Please Wake Up.
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randomsurfer
08:58:54 PM 24th Nov 2014

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BradyLady
Medium:
08:49:51 PM 24th Nov 2014
Is there a trope for a perfectly timed interruption? In Real Life, if two people are having a conversation, the phone rings or there is a knock on the door, it usually happens mid syllable, and the phone might ring two or three times before the people finish their conversation and answer. On TV, I see a lot of coming to a full break in the conversation, then the phone rings, and it's answered right away. On older shows like Perry Mason, half the time the caller is asking for someone who doesn't even live there—but just happens to be there on an appointment.
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DAN004
03:19:54 AM 21st Nov 2014
StarTropes
03:44:33 AM 21st Nov 2014
edited by StarTropes
Could be a variation on Talking Is a Free Action.
BradyLady
09:39:30 AM 21st Nov 2014
edited by BradyLady
Thanks, that second one is it, I think. Akin to the perp getting time for a long speech before being handcuffed and taken to jail, right? All actions are just perfectly timed around the dialog. It can't be the first one, because the whole point is, everything that needs to be said, gets a chance to be said.
BradyLady
09:41:44 AM 21st Nov 2014
Like, the phone doesn't ring or the visitor doesn't knock, until the person talking reaches the end of the paragraph and stops. That doesn't happen to any of us in real life. If the phone rings while we're talking, it's not going to wait until we're finished.
eroock
03:56:54 PM 21st Nov 2014
If we had such a trope, the phrase "People getting interrupted hal-" at Realistic Diction Is Unrealistic would have been potholed already.
Scorpion451
04:54:39 AM 23rd Nov 2014
Well, there is Killed Mid-Sentence but that's a bit of a different trope. X3
BradyLady
11:26:10 PM 23rd Nov 2014
I would say this is an aversion of Killed Mid-Sentence and "People getting interrupted hal-". The point is that, unlike reality, the speaker does NOT get interrupted in any way. The conversation is finished all the way before the phone rings. The killer gets his whole speech in before the handcuffs go on and he's led into custody. Talking Is a Free Action does seem to come the closest.
randomsurfer
08:49:51 PM 24th Nov 2014

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Timwi
Medium: Film
08:44:19 PM 24th Nov 2014
Is there a trope for the kind of scene (which I've seen a million times...) in which the audience knows that a drink or food item is poisoned or drugged, but the person drinking/eating it does not but remarks that it tastes awful (e.g. "this is the worst coffee I've ever had in my life!")?
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Bisected8
03:29:25 PM 24th Nov 2014
Timwi
03:58:24 PM 24th Nov 2014
That fits the bit where the character unwittingly eats/drinks the poison (although it seems very very general and would fit a large number of dissimilar examples), but not so much the comment the character makes about it tasting funny.
SolipSchism
04:16:01 PM 24th Nov 2014
I don't know about the situation as a whole, but you do have a number of smaller ideas.

  • Obviously, you have somebody Tampering with Food and Drink.
  • As mentioned, you have Dramatic Irony in the sense that the audience knows the food/drink is poisoned but the character does not.
  • I don't think this is a trope since it is very much Truth in Television, but I could see a case either way: Many poisons do in fact taste bitter—a result of human biology, evolving in such a way that poisonous substances taste bad to us, ideally causing us to spit it out. If I'm not mistaken, tasteless and odorless poisons are much more rare than bitter ones for this reason.
randomsurfer
08:44:19 PM 24th Nov 2014
Perhaps sniff around Bitter Almonds (which is a specific example of what you're describing) and see if any of the related tropes jump out as what you're looking for?

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scrooge20mcduck
Medium:
05:05:25 PM 24th Nov 2014
edited by scrooge20mcduck
You have Big Lipped Alligator Moment, but what if it's something that suddenly happens and appears really important and crucial to the story, but is then never spoken of again? There's this one story where a girl decides very firmly to go on a quest, but come the following chapters, she never mentions it again.
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NoriMori
04:52:29 AM 22nd Nov 2014
Closest things I can think of are Red Herring and Non Sequitur, except neither quite fits, as a Red Herring is used to intentionally deceive, and a Non Sequitur just plain doesn't make sense, and neither necessarily applies to what you describe. What you describe is like Notable Non Sequitur, except it turns out not to be notable. So I guess it's a subversion of that? How NOT to Write a Novel calls unintentional Red Herrings "The Gum on the Mantelpiece", but I don't know if we have an equivalent trope.

Could be related to Aborted Arc if it was supposed to be significant but whatever it was supposed to lead up to was dropped. "Lord Tedd" in El Goonish Shive would be an example of that, if not for the fact that it's actually just a very long postponed arc that is going to come back again at some point.

Then again, depending on whether the thing you're reading is finished (either by you or by the author), it's possible it will come up again. Without context it's hard to know the character might just be a Cloudcuckoolander who brings up things like that and then drops them.
scrooge20mcduck
05:50:38 AM 22nd Nov 2014
Red Herring might be the closest to what I'm looking for, I guess it's a peculiar example. Thank you.
DAN004
03:34:45 PM 22nd Nov 2014
Sounds like the Index Of A Week
Synchronicity
02:39:32 AM 23rd Nov 2014
eroock
05:05:25 PM 24th Nov 2014
^ This. Or Aborted Arc for a larger scale.

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Tsukireiko
Medium:
04:01:50 PM 24th Nov 2014
What do you call when a series makes an reference to another series, sometimes, but not always as a form of promotion for that series? For example, a certain series makes a media appearance (as a book, movie, video game, advertisement, etc.) in another series that was made by the same company or written by the same person.

Is it a Crossover? Is it a Shout-Out? I'm not really sure how to categorize this. Crossover to me implies the two series actually collide with each other/characters meet with each other. Shout Out, on the other hand, makes me think of easter eggs where a series refers to another series that it has otherwise no relation to whatsoever, and is usually one that is relatively well-known so most people would get the reference (like Doctor Who talking about Harry Potter).
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DAN004
02:56:20 PM 23rd Nov 2014
Try giving an example
BradyLady
11:31:00 PM 23rd Nov 2014
Sounds similar to Actor Allusion.
SolipSchism
02:40:45 PM 24th Nov 2014
It might be along the lines of Mutually Fictional (evidently trivia, not a trope), but the description on that article is hellishly confusing.
Timwi
04:01:50 PM 24th Nov 2014
edited by Timwi
I'm not the OP, but the description reminds me of some LucasArts adventure games. For example, Zak Mc Kracken contains a poster advertising Maniac Mansion and The Secret Of Monkey Island contains a pirate that will happily tell you all about Loom.

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burnpsy
Medium: Videogame
03:58:32 AM 24th Nov 2014
Do we have a trope for when hack and slashes give you waves of enemies even when it would not make any sense at all in-universe?

For example, in multiple Senran Kagura games, if you're playing a faction opposing the protagonists (a school with exactly 6 ninjas, no more, no less), you still get generic Mooks themed to the school, just like if you were playing the protagonists against a school with tons of students (where this would normally make sense).
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DAN004
01:42:53 AM 24th Nov 2014
Not that tropeworthy
Daefaroth
03:58:32 AM 24th Nov 2014
Probably a variation on Respawning Enemies

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Ledinax
Medium:
11:18:08 PM 23rd Nov 2014
I've seen this one over a million times, but I can't seem to find it. Basically, Alice defends Bob by saying: "Yes, he may be an asshole, but he's MY ASSHOLE". I don't think it needs further explaining.
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Bisected8
08:55:22 AM 23rd Nov 2014
Vitriolic Best Buds covers the relationship and Hypocritical Heartwarming covers the situation, I think?
Ledinax
09:03:46 AM 23rd Nov 2014
Basically, yeah, but it's so common I'd be surprised if it itself wasn't another Trope. I think I even found it by chance here, but who knows... Maybe I'm imagining things.
Scorpion451
09:10:39 AM 23rd Nov 2014
Hypocritical Heartwarming is the exact trope for the "but they're my X" thing. No New Stock Phrases means we probably don't have one for the specific line unless it got made before the ban.
BradyLady
11:18:08 PM 23rd Nov 2014
edited by BradyLady
Would that be similar to an Insult Backfire in which the person being insulted proudly claims the label?
Bob has just made fun of a morbidly obese woman, and Alice calls him an asshole. Bob replies, "I may be an asshole, but at least I'm a fit and trim asshole."
Carol makes it a habit of replying to whatever name she is called, "I'm a (bitch, retard, whatever) and proud of it!"
From The West Wing, Vinick's response to being called a "liberal" as if it were a bad thing.
Vinick: I will pick up that label and wear it as a badge of honor.

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grapesandmilk
Medium:
11:12:37 PM 23rd Nov 2014
edited by grapesandmilk
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Bisected8
05:34:15 PM 23rd Nov 2014

For example:

  • If Alice knows Bob stole Claire's sweetroll and promised not to tell anyone, but she says "I could tell you Bob took it, but I promised not to tell", she Could Say It But.
  • If Alice doesn't want to give Bob away and Claire demands that Alice tell her who did it, but she says "Hah! I'll never tell you Bob did it...oops!", it's I'll Never Tell You What I'm Telling You.
BradyLady
11:12:37 PM 23rd Nov 2014
edited by BradyLady
So in a nutshell, one is deliberate and the other is unintentional?

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leo235
Medium:
12:38:14 PM 23rd Nov 2014
edited by leo235
A more specific version of A Boy and His X

Its powerful . Emotionally simple in that it can only love, has no negative emotions or is just loyal beyond questioning. Its externally bound in addition to their bond (lives in a pokeball, can only fly with help or only evolve with a digivice).

If it doesnt exist, do you feel such a trope should exist?
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phalanx
09:39:11 AM 23rd Nov 2014
Bond Creatures, The Kid with the Remote Control. If the creature is sufficiently powerful, it's Olympus Mons.
DAN004
09:39:19 AM 23rd Nov 2014
leo235
12:38:13 PM 23rd Nov 2014
hmm yeah Bond Creatures is pretty close I guess. The focus on the "bond" botheres me there but this is all so subjective. Thanks

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ricree
Medium:
07:30:28 AM 23rd Nov 2014
What's the trope where a person or group is up against someone that totally outclasses them, but for various reasons the confrontation turns into a contest or bet with clearly defined rules that allow the protagonists to come out ahead.

It might happen for metaphysical reasons (especially with things like ghosts, demons, fairies, etc), or because of the stronger party's whim, or maybe bet that offered something they couldn't simply take by force. The important point is that it takes an otherwise unwinnable confrontation and changes it into a more limited game or contest.
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Scorpion451
10:37:59 AM 22nd Nov 2014
Bisected8
01:39:12 PM 22nd Nov 2014
Duels Decide Everything (when the means they use is what people use to decide their conflicts all the time)?
ricree
06:59:43 AM 23rd Nov 2014
Chess with Death is probably the closest to what I'm thinking of, and perhaps the only trope on the subject. It does feel slightly different, in a subtle way I'm not quite sure I can express.

I'm thinking of cases like Worm's Slaughterhouse 9 arc, or the deadline in Labyrinth. Some examples in Chess with Death seem to fit that, but most are just regular games with high stakes.
Scorpion451
07:30:28 AM 23rd Nov 2014

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DAN004
Medium:
07:28:28 AM 23rd Nov 2014
What's the difference of Pinocchio Syndrome, Become a Real Boy and Humanity Ensues?
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Freezer
10:58:31 PM 21st Nov 2014
edited by Freezer
  • Pinocchio Syndrome: Subject wants to become human or as close to human as possible for them. (Ex. Pinocchio himself)
  • Become a Real Boy: Subject wants to become more human-like, without changing himself physically. (Ex. Data from Star Trek: TNG)
  • Humanity Ensues: Subject is straight-up turned human: usually involuntary and unwanted. (Q from TNG getting turned fully human for an episode.)
Scorpion451
07:28:28 AM 23rd Nov 2014
  • Pinocchio Syndrome: The focus is specifically on the desire and ensuing efforts to become human, or at least adopting some human traits, because Humans Are Special. Frequently used as an exploration of What Measure Is a Non-Human?.
    • This can be played in a large number of ways: Hilarity Ensues as an metallic android attempts to achieve humanity by wearing wigs and modeling its behavior after the Telenovelas it watches all day, Tragedy ensues as it realizes the futility of trying to become human, Horror ensues when it concludes that uploading to a Wetware Body could be the key to its "ascension".
  • Become a Real Boy: a non-human character actually succeeds in becoming a human or human-like, nearly always portrayed in a positive light:
  • Humanity Ensues: Tropey the Wonder Dog is now Tropey the socially awkward human who enjoys chasing squirrels and being able open the dog treat container with his fancy thumbs, meanwhile Sa'Dxyrrig the Ever-Raging is currently raging because the wizard's Heroic Sacrifice has irrevocably transformed the would-be conqueror into a 11 year old Dark Magical Girl with pigtails.


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Openlake
Medium:
10:07:15 PM 22nd Nov 2014
Is there a trope for recurring but unrelated videogame obstacles? An example for this would be when a player has to run from a fire in one level, then in another had to run from pursuers in another. Is it a form of foreshadowing?
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Scorpion451
07:17:09 PM 22nd Nov 2014
I think what you're seeing is a trope being played out several times in the course of a game: the examples you gave, for instance, are both Escape Sequences and probably also Auto Scrolling Levels. Specifically, they'd be Outrun the Fireball and Advancing Boss of Doom in the form of a Wolfpack Boss
Kayube
10:07:15 PM 22nd Nov 2014
Antepiece is another good one, for when the earlier obstacle serves as training for the later one.

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NoriMori
Medium:
07:19:18 PM 22nd Nov 2014
edited by NoriMori
Is there a trope like Lip-Lock Sun-Block, but with normal things? Like this? Cool shot of someone obscuring or moving past the sun?
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DAN004
03:36:44 PM 22nd Nov 2014
Scorpion451
07:19:18 PM 22nd Nov 2014
Lens Flare, possibly

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SmartGirl333
Medium:
07:09:24 PM 22nd Nov 2014
edited by SmartGirl333
What is that trope that distance from the microphone (in some In-Universe show) doesn't matter at all? Here's an example: in My Little Pony Equestria Girls: Rainbow Rocks, it is both averted when Rarity is dragged across the stage by magnets, making it hard for her voice to be heard and played straight when Rainbow Dash slides across the stage and the song remains constant.
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Scorpion451
07:09:24 PM 22nd Nov 2014
sounds like Acoustic License

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immortalfrieza
Medium:
06:34:39 PM 22nd Nov 2014
edited by immortalfrieza
Is there a trope for villains that don't really interact with the heroes much if at all before the final fight and thus most of the work is about fixing the chaos the villain causes rather than fighting the villain or his henchmen directly?

i.e. Such as Majora's Mask's Skull Kid.
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phalanx
06:34:39 PM 22nd Nov 2014

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Batman39
Medium: Western Animation
06:13:10 PM 22nd Nov 2014
edited by Batman39
What's that trope where a character (or characters) grabs a character and takes them offscreen and then emerges wearing their outfit/taking their place. It's usually done either to A. Infiltrate or B. to steal the spotlight (the other character got a role in a play they wanted or something)

Right off the top of my head Hey Arnold and Rugrats in Paris have both done it but it's so common that it has becomes parodied quite frequently.
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DAN004
06:13:10 PM 22nd Nov 2014

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BradyLady
Medium:
03:33:29 PM 22nd Nov 2014
I could have sworn there was a Funeral Cut trope, similar to Gilligan Cut but more closely related to Ambulance Cut, but as you can see by the red link, there is not one. Did it disappear? Or did I only imagine it?

Notable example, the scene in Private Benjamin where the happy couple is making love on their wedding night. The husband finishes, then goes silent. Wife becomes alarmed. "Yael? YAEL????" Cut to his funeral. It's later revealed he had a heart attack.
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DAN004
03:33:29 PM 22nd Nov 2014
It's still in ykttw

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