Lost And Found

You've got this trope sticking in your mind. You can remember the general idea, and maybe an example or two, but you'll be damned if you can remember what the thing's called, and the search function turns up nothing relevant. Ask about it here.
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shigmiya64
Medium:
02:05:59 PM 17th Apr 2014
Is there a trope for how spiders in fiction will spit their webbing out of their mouths instead of slowly producing it out the back of the abdomen like in real life?
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sentairider42
01:47:16 PM 17th Apr 2014
What your looking for might be Reality Is Unrealistic
JoieDeCombat
02:05:59 PM 17th Apr 2014
I don't see how it would fit into Reality Is Unrealistic, unless you end up with a case of people expecting real spiders to create their webs the way fictional spider monsters do, which I don't believe is the case.

It might be covered by Artistic License - Biology?

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Withoutaname
Medium:
02:00:07 PM 17th Apr 2014
Two related tropes:

A materialist cares more about his possessions than he does about his life, and will do anything to save them from dangerous situations.

Subtrope: A journalist/reporter/photographer who worries more about his camera and getting "the story" than about saving his own life in dangerous situations. If the hero saves him from a falling boulder he'll say "what the hell man you ruined the shot"
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Bisected8
10:36:44 AM 16th Apr 2014
PPPSSC
11:02:19 AM 16th Apr 2014
DAN004
04:10:29 PM 16th Apr 2014
Omrega
02:00:07 PM 17th Apr 2014

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BradyLady
Medium:
10:41:45 AM 17th Apr 2014
edited by BradyLady
Similar to a Face Palm, but with different intent and in different circumstances. I've noticed that looking upward and placing the back of one's hand or wrist against the forehead,is a melodramatic gesture. Judy Garland as Dorothy did this in the poppy field sequence, when she complained that she just couldn't go on any farther and had to have a nap. It may be more common in older films. The accompanying line is usually something in the area of, "Oh, me. How distressing. I think I'm going to faint." I've also seen it used ironically, making fun of melodramatic attitudes, while speaking words similar to what I just quoted. Is this gesture already troped?

EDIT, the same question asked on my Facebook page has generated a connection to "the vapors" and Victorian Novel Disease.
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BradyLady
Medium:
10:27:56 AM 17th Apr 2014
edited by BradyLady
Is there a specific trope for the type of no-win situation where the Butt Monkey can do no right, even if they do exactly as they were told? In particular, I'm thinking this sequence of events.

Alice, the Butt Monkey Unfavorite child, has a little brother, Bob. When they are at the playground, Bob tries to climb the wrong way up the slide, falls off, and is injured. Many recriminations rain down on Alice, because she should have been watching her little brother. How could she just let that happen?

After the injury is healed, again Alice and Bob are at the playground. Bob, in a classic case of Aesop Amnesia, begins to climb the wrong way up the slide. Alice, remembering all too well what happened last time, tries to stop him. Bob complains to their parent that Alice is being bossy. Again Alice catches hell. "You are not his mother, young lady. You don't tell him what to do. You come and get me, and let me handle it!"

So she does next time. Whereupon she is chewed out for being a tattletale.

Obviously the rules keep being re-written so that no matter what Alice does, it's the wrong thing. This can happen in any situation where an authority figure can single one person out as always in the wrong. What is this trope?

EDIT or is this purely Moving The Goal Posts? I seem to have trouble knowing exactly what that entails. It seems to me that Moving The Goal Posts would be if the parent tells Alice she can go to the party if she cleans her room well enough, but then keeps finding increasingly ridiculous things wrong with the immaculately clean room. "You haven't finished yet. You have to straighten out your dresser drawers. No, the socks aren't lined up in a perfect row. Now you have to make sure the fringe on the area rug is evenly spaced." Etc.
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DAN004
06:41:31 AM 16th Apr 2014
BradyLady
10:27:56 AM 17th Apr 2014
"You can go to the party if you clean your room," but it's never going to be clean enough. That's Moving The Goal Posts, we all agree.

"Whatever you do is the wrong thing, even if it's exactly what I told you to do." That's the same trope? Is one a subtrope of the other?

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shokoshu
Medium:
07:56:37 AM 17th Apr 2014
"Enantiodromy" is a hobby concept of one of the "Perry Rhodan" SF authors, describing A=>-A. "=>" here doesn't denote simply time (a thing changing into its opposite), but rather logical necessity. His standard example was organized crime taking over the state: as soon as it's successful, it will tend to enforce the law itself (when you pay "protection money" to the Mafia, and some rogue criminal jacks your shop, both you and the Mafia will be miffed :-) The "proof by contradiction" in Math could also vaguely be filed under this concept (thus I wrote A=>-A).

Now, which Tropes here are related to the concept? (The first I thought of was "Suspiciously Specific Denial", where asserting A leads everyone to believe -A.)
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DAN004
Medium:
06:54:09 AM 17th Apr 2014
What's the difference of Me's a Crowd and Self-Duplication?
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JoieDeCombat
06:54:09 AM 17th Apr 2014
Self-Duplication is the ability to create copies of oneself. Me's a Crowd is a plot involving that power in which the duplicates behave in ways the original did not intend.

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Chabal2
Medium:
06:44:18 AM 17th Apr 2014
Is there an "innocent hypocrite" trope, where the character is unaware of their behavior?

For example, this Dumbing of Age strip, where Joyce (who had a very sheltered, fundamentalist Christian upbringing, one of her biggest problems is learning the real world contains different opinions) unintentionally compares Internet fandom to religious debates, using an argument seen on the pro-atheist side. The others are aware of it, but let her keep talking.

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DAN004
02:16:34 AM 17th Apr 2014
crazysamaritan
06:44:18 AM 17th Apr 2014
edited by crazysamaritan
[In-Universe] Unfortunate Implications: Joyce (a sheltered fundamentalist Christian) describes a fandom war the same way many atheists describe The Bible. Her friends choose to let the event pass by without pointing it out to her, but they are tempted.

No, wait, it was one of the Aesop tropes.... (edit)

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MasterheartsXIII
Medium: Videogame
06:41:54 AM 17th Apr 2014
edited by MasterheartsXIII
Do we have a trope similar to No Hero Discount but for items that you have to collect a certain amount of. My example better explains. In the game, Ty the Tasmanian Tiger, you have to collect a certain amount of thunder eggs to collect the all important talismans. To obtain these thunder eggs you have to get them from people who have already found them or as the game puts it,"convince the locals to part with their prized possessions." That makes since for people who don't know that the main bad guy is trying to collect the talismans first to take over the world, but for the people that do know and are trying to help you, shouldn't they hand their thunder eggs over as soon as they know you need them instead of making you work for them? So, that's my example. Anyone know if we have it yet?
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snowing_reunion
Medium:
02:25:12 AM 17th Apr 2014
Is there a trope for a a place like the Bright Castle, except with "crystal spires", kind of like a dream palace type of place? All white marble, not quite ascetic aesthetic, just very dreamlike. A poet's moon always shining, that kind of thing, non-spooky/ominous. A part of a book I'm writing takes place at a place like this and I'd be interested to learn more about what trope it could be. Best example I can think of is the Silver Millenium (Kingdom) palace place from Sailor Moon. Any thoughts/help? Thanks!
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DAN004
10:45:00 PM 15th Apr 2014
snowing_reunion
10:57:16 PM 15th Apr 2014
Well, it appears Shining Castle doesn't exist really, but kinda that idea?

And Crystal Spires and Togas isn't it because the place isn't super futuristic, just dreamlike — no science or advanced technology
snowing_reunion
10:59:02 PM 15th Apr 2014
No crystals, aliens, etc. — less Xanadu than all of that. Like, just a dream palace kinda place.

Idk if that helps at all and of course, I don't know if it even (sort of) exists outside of my mind, ha
snowing_reunion
11:42:40 PM 16th Apr 2014
bump
snowing_reunion
11:42:48 PM 16th Apr 2014
bump
snowing_reunion
11:43:04 PM 16th Apr 2014
really trying to bump
snowing_reunion
11:43:19 PM 16th Apr 2014
gonna keep on bumpin
snowing_reunion
11:43:28 PM 16th Apr 2014
one last little bump
snowing_reunion
11:43:45 PM 16th Apr 2014
okay last one I swear, someone help me out
ShanghaiSlave
01:12:40 AM 17th Apr 2014
quit bumping on the same day.

people don't live in TV Tropes you know, and this isn't a chatbox.

anyway, Bright Castle...
snowing_reunion
02:25:12 AM 17th Apr 2014
alright alright, sorry haha


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lexicon
Medium:
02:18:48 AM 17th Apr 2014
The Other Wiki says, "Princess Fiona is initially portrayed as the archetypal princess from fairy tales, speaking formally in matters of courtship and presenting high expectations of how she is to be rescued, who is to rescue her, and so forth." What fairy tales is it referring to? What is this called? It definitely isn't Princess Classic.
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DAN004
12:56:00 AM 16th Apr 2014
Himedere?
Synchronicity
07:53:25 PM 16th Apr 2014
I'm not sure what you're asking. "The archetypal princess" is Princess Classic. "presenting high expectations of how she is to be rescued, who is to rescue her, and so forth" could be Genre Savvy, as she's familiar with the Fairy Tale genre and its workings.
DAN004
02:18:48 AM 17th Apr 2014

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Larkmarn
Medium:
08:40:50 PM 16th Apr 2014
Someone answers the phone and assumes it's someone on the other line (or a telemarketer) and it turns out to be someone else entirely.
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megahello
Medium:
08:11:40 PM 16th Apr 2014
Is there a trope for when a character is on the phone and it seems that the're being very impersonal or even rude to the person the're talking to, but at the end it's revealed that the person the're talking to is their mother.
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Koveras
12:33:42 AM 29th Mar 2014
I don't think we do, because it's a tad Too Specific To Trope.
DAN004
03:16:32 AM 29th Mar 2014
Example, maybe?
ShanghaiSlave
05:51:36 AM 29th Mar 2014
megahello
08:40:56 AM 29th Mar 2014
edited by megahello
This happens to Rudy on the kickin' it episode "the new girl" and I also remember this happening to Barney on an early episode of how I met your mother. No other examples off the top of my head but I know I'v seen this other places.
megahello
08:54:02 AM 29th Mar 2014
edited by megahello
Innocently Insensitive doesn't really fit. In the above examples it's used to show Rudy's Acquired Situational Narcissism and that Barney is a Jerk with a Heart of Gold.
megahello
03:56:58 PM 30th Mar 2014
This also happens to Marshall in the How I Met Your Mother episode "Spoiler Alert"
megahello
07:35:06 PM 1st Apr 2014
Bump
megahello
08:09:50 PM 3rd Apr 2014
Bump.
megahello
10:22:15 AM 6th Apr 2014
Bump
megahello
05:46:23 PM 12th Apr 2014
Bump
ShanghaiSlave
01:23:36 PM 13th Apr 2014
got any non-phone examples?
megahello
08:11:40 PM 16th Apr 2014
edited by megahello
It doesn't really work without the phone, because otherwise it's hard to not know who they're talking to. I guess it can happen in person if the person is one-shot character, when we've never seen the mother before and probably won't see her again(It's unlikely that they'ed introduce a character's mother just for that) , but I've never seen that before. BTW it doesn't have to be a mother, as long as the audience knows the person has or should have a close relationship the person as soon as they are addressed.

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DanglingModifier
Medium:
08:01:57 PM 16th Apr 2014
Okay, not sure what to even search for... Is there a name for when someone is given or has the possibility of getting everything s/he wanted, minus one thing, and the one thing is the deal-breaker? The best example I can think of is The Simpsons Treehouse of Horror episode where Homer travels through time and creates an alternate reality where the family's wealthy, Marge's sisters are dead, the kids are perfectly behaved, etc., but they've never heard of donuts... which causes Homer to go back and change reality again.
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randomsurfer
09:00:45 PM 15th Apr 2014
There's a moribund ykttw called Dealbreaker you might want to look at.
randomsurfer
09:01:06 PM 15th Apr 2014
edited by randomsurfer
[deleting double post.]
DanglingModifier
08:01:57 PM 16th Apr 2014
edited by DanglingModifier
Yeah, that one needs some serious work. Though it seems to be about the stock definition of deal breakers vs. someone turning down LITERALLY everything they've ever wanted because... arbitrary thing.

Another example is the end of Deponia, where Rufus gets exactly what he wants, but the guilt is too heavy for him to live with, so he goes back on the deal.

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PistolsAtDawn
Medium:
07:55:18 PM 16th Apr 2014
Let me describe a situation and please tell me what trope(s) covers it.

Bob is a cute but socially akward nerd with no fashion sense and only a few equally nerdy friends. Bob gains superpowers. Though he keeps his powers a secret, he suddenly begins dressing better, acting more confident, and hitting on girls he was way to shy to talk to before.

It's not Adrenilin Makeover because he hasnt used his powers in combat: the powers themselves have given him enough confidence to be someone new
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Freezer
12:55:24 PM 14th Apr 2014
PistolsAtDawn
09:38:25 PM 14th Apr 2014
HMMM.

is that really the closest we've got? seems odd :/
ShanghaiSlave
09:46:14 PM 14th Apr 2014
She Cleans Up Nicely isn't it, those involved are still shy.

What he wants is a trope that involves getting confindence...
Freezer
10:01:54 PM 14th Apr 2014
Do you have examples?

DAN004
01:21:59 AM 15th Apr 2014
PistolsAtDawn
10:40:55 AM 15th Apr 2014
^^ I do.

Patience from the Catwoman movie immediately changes her personality upon becoming Catwoman, cuts her hair and starts acting more confident

Mr Incredible in the Incredibles, though he had powers all along, lradicaly changes personality when he gets the oppurtunity to go back to using them

Ray from Please Don't Tell My Parents I'm a Supervillain is what I was describing above: He goes from nerd to Camp Straight Chivalrous Pervert in one weekend becuase he gets superstrength

Please Don't Tell My Parents I'm a Supervillain doesnt have a page yet but Im making it one, thats why I need this trope

^ Character Developement seems to be more gradual than this. This is closer to Aquired Situational Narsisism, in that its an immediate and sometimes temporary change in personality
ShanghaiSlave
07:26:44 PM 15th Apr 2014
^ err... do you have Dyslexia by any chance?
Freezer
12:15:11 AM 16th Apr 2014
I don't think Mr. Incredible would count here, as his personality shifted back to the one he had before he and the other supers were forced into retirement. More the real Mr. Incredible reemerging. Otherwise, it sounds like what you want is Adrenaline Makeover meets Touched by Vorlons.
PistolsAtDawn
08:42:45 AM 16th Apr 2014
^^ lol nope sorry, I was typing on my phone and it's a pain to use

Don't worry, I always spell better on the actual work pages Xp

^yeah that looks closer. and you're right, he probably wouldn't. Either way, I guess that's as close as I'm getting unless I make a new trope.
Synchronicity
07:55:18 PM 16th Apr 2014
I think something like Powers Induced Confidence is definitely tropable. Might get around to YKTTW-ing it myself.

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MonaNaito
Medium:
07:49:47 PM 16th Apr 2014
Do we have a "doves symbolize purity" trope? There's nothing in Avian Tropes, Animal Motifs or Biblical Motifs.
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DAN004
04:12:18 PM 16th Apr 2014
Maybe we don't.
Synchronicity
07:49:47 PM 16th Apr 2014
edited by Synchronicity
Hmmm. I don't think we do. I'd love to see this YKTTW'd.

Here's an example:

  • Donald Hall and Dawn Granger, the original and legacy superheroes Dove, are both so incorruptibly pure that they were the only superheroes not corrupted by the Black Rings in Blackest Night.

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GeneralLuigi
Medium:
07:46:36 PM 16th Apr 2014
edited by GeneralLuigi
Is there a trope for characters who betrayed their comrades (with the protagonist probably among them), but are portrayed sympathetically? Essentially, rather than being shown as the lowest of the low, this traitor comes off as a Woobie.
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DAN004
07:37:06 PM 16th Apr 2014
Synchronicity
07:46:36 PM 16th Apr 2014
Conflicting Loyalty is also played for sympathy.

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Hodor
Medium:
05:29:06 PM 16th Apr 2014
edited by Hodor
Is there a trope for doctors who abuse their profession to get "touchy feely" with patients. I wondered because of a Game of Thrones example with the Dirty Old Man Maester Pycelle and I know Law and Order also had a plot dealing with a doctor sexually assaulting patients.

We have a trope called Doctor Feelgood, but that is about something entirely different.
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FuzzyBoots
12:50:51 PM 16th Apr 2014
There are also a handful of jokes such as the one with the doctor justifying the sex he's having by reflecting that a lot of doctors have sex with their patients before deciding that most of them probably aren't veterinarians.
DAN004
04:06:19 PM 16th Apr 2014
edited by DAN004
Hodor
05:29:06 PM 16th Apr 2014
Thanks.

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sentairider42
Medium:
04:14:06 PM 16th Apr 2014
edited by sentairider42
Is there a trope for when two people (in this case, highschool students) just all of a sudden start getting into a catfight, and then, just as suddenly, everyone watching starts betting on who's going to win?

the example I had in mind was pretty much any time in Mahou Sensei Negima!, whenever Asuna and Incho are going at each other
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DAN004
10:45:34 PM 15th Apr 2014
Everyone watching = Pass the Popcorn
sentairider42
11:27:28 PM 15th Apr 2014
Ok. But do we have anything for the spontaneous betting?
DAN004
12:56:46 AM 16th Apr 2014
I guess not. Nor is it notable.
sentairider42
06:54:25 AM 16th Apr 2014
oh.
crazysamaritan
08:08:25 AM 16th Apr 2014
MonaNaito
08:14:41 AM 16th Apr 2014
But there is such a thing as Too Rare to Trope, which I think is what DAN 004 was going for.
DAN004
04:14:06 PM 16th Apr 2014
^ exactly.

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henke37
Medium:
12:36:50 PM 16th Apr 2014
It seems to me as if there is a lot of Disappeared Dads that set off on an adventure. Do we have this sub-trope?
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Bisected8
04:37:14 AM 15th Apr 2014
We have Daddy Had a Good Reason for Abandoning You, does that cover what you had in mind?
henke37
07:56:58 AM 15th Apr 2014
edited by henke37
I don't think that it does. That trope is about there being a good reason why. This is a specific kind of reason, good or bad.

To use dialog: "Your father ran of on an adventure, leaving me to take care of you and your brother!"

Here are some examples:
ShanghaiSlave
10:00:09 AM 15th Apr 2014
nice find. make a YKTTW!
henke37
03:12:18 AM 16th Apr 2014
I won't do it myself, since I always end up abandoning them.
ShanghaiSlave
12:36:49 PM 16th Apr 2014
just make one and tag it Up for Grabs. someone will eventually finish it up for you. not that you'd get credit for "making" it. but hey e-peen ain't as good as it seems.

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Furienna
Medium:
11:25:05 AM 16th Apr 2014
edited by Furienna
It says in the description that a Spirited Young Lady has to belong to the middle class or the upper class. But what if a girl has that personality, except she comes from a much poorer background? Does she maybe belong in a different trope? I know there's Rebellious Princess for when she's a princesses.
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MonaNaito
08:27:44 AM 16th Apr 2014
Plucky Girl, maybe? It's not quite the same as Spirited Young Lady, but there is some overlap.
Furienna
08:32:33 AM 16th Apr 2014
Hmm... Yes, there sure is some overlap. Maybe that will have to do.
lexicon
11:25:05 AM 16th Apr 2014
Plucky Girl covers the spirited part but doesn't touch on the lady part. If she's from a much poorer background she's probably not a lady but I think she should be able to qualify if there are ladylike rules that she bends but doesn't break. Do you have any examples?

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ZuTheSkunk
Medium:
07:18:19 AM 16th Apr 2014
Do we have a trope for a situation where there are numerous competitors in a competition, and it seems at first that the protagonist lost by being just behind the winners, but then one of the winners gets disqualified and therefore the protagonist joins the rest of the winners?
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DAN004
06:40:51 AM 16th Apr 2014
ZuTheSkunk
07:18:19 AM 16th Apr 2014
This trope is, as far as I can tell, about the last stand between two remaining teams. What I meant is a competition deciding which teams/people will qualify to the next matches, so more about the protagonist luckily getting a chance to continue in the competition.

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Biagio
Medium: Videogame
10:46:08 PM 15th Apr 2014
I wonder if there's a trope that covers something i've noticed lately.

Competition games generally have a goal especially if there's a chance of dying. Whether it's DBZ's world strongest for Zenni or Jerkass Genie Calypso's Wish in Twisted Metal games there's usually a reward. Even Soul Calibur when it had endings made the winner get what they want. But in Mortal Kombat 2011 Sonya blade goes crazy and goes into solitude until her dead father's ghost tells her to kill. Kabal nearly dies and is now paying off his debt to Kano's cyberneticist for fixing him up. These endings don't really seem like wins. I mean Johnny Cage's has him causing massive amounts of property damage by accident because of his power but at least it ends with him in another world being trained. I suppose what i'm asking is there a trope for "Tournament without a prize or happy ending"

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DAN004
10:46:08 PM 15th Apr 2014

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Thebiguglyalien
Medium:
10:44:22 PM 15th Apr 2014
I've got two different tropes I'm looking for:

In the first trope, every character in the room says his or her Catch Phrase. Except one character does not have a catchphrase, and says something random.

In the second trope, there was someone who used to go on adventures and do amazing things, but they've retired now. Other characters insist that the hero go back to what he does best, but he refuses. More often than not, they convince him to "get back in the game".
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DAN004
10:44:22 PM 15th Apr 2014

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MonaNaito
Medium:
08:47:47 PM 15th Apr 2014
What's the trope for when Alice and Bob are romantically compatible because Alice has a trait that makes her immune to Bob's most obvious flaw? Can be Played for Drama (Bob is a hideous monster, but Alice is blind) or Played for Laughs (Bob talks complete nonsense; Alice is deaf or doesn't speak the language).
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Bisected8
02:48:21 PM 14th Apr 2014
There's Blind and the Beast, but that's specifically about blind people. No Accounting for Taste covers flaws in general, but I'm not quite sure it's what you're after.
FuzzyWulfe
08:26:10 PM 14th Apr 2014
Not sure what the trope is. I know the concept is that one or both people are Blessed with Suck, but something in their natures negates the suck. Like Rogue had a relationship with Magneto because he could create a magnetic field around himself that protected him form her powers; Colossus could also touch her if he was in his metal form. If a medusa wanted love but couldn't look at a man, she would find a man that was compatible with him but also blind so that he never actually looked upon her face to be turned to stone.
DAN004
09:42:22 PM 14th Apr 2014
MonaNaito
10:00:54 PM 14th Apr 2014
^^^ Yeah, this would theoretically be the supertrope to Blind and the Beast.
DanglingModifier
08:47:47 PM 15th Apr 2014
edited by DanglingModifier
This was used to clever, non-romantic effect in an issue of Usagi Yojimbo, where Usagi catches a demonic head that feasts on flesh and gives it to a lonely, obnoxious widow whose garden is constantly overrun with lizards. The head gets to eat meat, and the widow has company.

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Thainen
Medium:
07:27:30 PM 15th Apr 2014
Is there a trope for this situation? An assassin is working for the Big Bad. For personal reasons he decides to kill The Hero. Big Bad didn't order his death, and possibly even directly tells him not to do that, since it may interfere with the Evil Plan. The assassin answers: "I'll do this one for free" and proceeds.
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AnoBakaDesu
09:45:21 AM 15th Apr 2014
Not in This for Your Revolution if the assassin thinks the Big Bad's Evil Plan is second fiddle to his vendetta against The Hero.
thainen
02:22:57 PM 15th Apr 2014
Too complicated. I meant the situation when the assassin wants to do additional job. I'm sure that I've seen the line "this one is for free" several times.
DAN004
03:57:41 PM 15th Apr 2014
ShanghaiSlave
07:27:30 PM 15th Apr 2014
Psycho for Hire might lead you to it with it's related tropes.

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DAN004
Medium:
10:13:16 PM 14th Apr 2014
What's the difference of Faux Death, Disney Death and Not Quite Dead?
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Freezer
07:50:36 PM 14th Apr 2014
Faux Death: A state that looks like death, but isn't. (See: Sleeping Beauty)

Disney Death: Bad Guy meets his fate in a manner that preserves the G/PG rating (see Beauty And The Beast).

Not Quite Dead: Bob suffers what should've been a mortal wound, survives.
justanotherrandomlurker
07:54:10 PM 14th Apr 2014
Dan, aren't you one of the staff here?
DAN004
08:05:08 PM 14th Apr 2014
What about Only Mostly Dead?

^ nope, just a normal member :p
ShanghaiSlave
09:50:07 PM 14th Apr 2014
Only Mostly Dead is clinically dead, as in, body still functioning, so still healable, but is considered "dead".

in short, dead but reviveable as opposed to dead as in can't even be revived with revival phlebotinum.

also, congrats, someone mistook you for a mod, o_O. how dat happen though...
PPPSSC
10:13:16 PM 14th Apr 2014
@Freezer, that's Disney Villain Death not Disney Death (and even then, it's less about preserving the rating and more about not dirtying the heroes' hands). Disney Death is where the audience is expected to believe a character is dead for a short period of time (with other characters mourning, sad music, etc.) but then they're revealed to be alive and/or saved.

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creatrixtiara
Medium:
06:01:40 PM 14th Apr 2014
Is there a trope that covers the recurring (often in YA lit) theme of teenagers getting streamed in some sort of test or selection process that determines their destiny forever?

e.g. Hunger Games's Reaping, Divergent's tests, Harry Potter's Sorting Hat, to some degree the separation between Specials and Pretties in the Uglies series

It's almost always teens, and the tests are often pretty arbitrary, and it's used to support social segregation (divide and conquer).

I thought Achievement Test of Destiny might be it, but that implies that you can study and prepare for this test, and that's not usually the case with these.

Also on a related note: Are there tropes that cover social segregation happening to teens (some sort of Rite of Passage thing?) and how in the last book of a lot of YA series there's some sort of camping trip involved?
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Lythande
Medium:
03:32:32 PM 14th Apr 2014
This seems like it should be Classy as Hell, but that page is empty.

You have a character who is either classy, or affects class, who does something surprisingly low-class. Your regal queen drops an F-bomb, or your gentleman thief assures someone "I'm classy as hell," or a foreign dignitary who's so far fit right in licks his plate at a banquet.

Basically I'm looking for it specifically being jarring to the perceptions of the other characters (and maybe the audience), even if it reflects a hidden part of their character or happens through their ignorance rather than being out of character.
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Bisected8
02:43:18 PM 14th Apr 2014
It sounds like you were after Sophisticated as Hell. Precision F-Strike also covers the "single, well placed profanity" part.
Lythande
02:45:02 PM 14th Apr 2014
Sophisticated as hell is unfortunately way too specifically about the language, particularly juxtaposition of classy and unclassy language, which doesn't really have anything to do with the character. It looked promising at first when I searched but I was disappointed.
DAN004
03:00:48 PM 14th Apr 2014
Lythande
03:32:32 PM 14th Apr 2014
^I thought there would be something more specific but it looks like there's not. Hidden Depths it is, thanks. :)

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sentairider42
Medium:
09:33:30 AM 14th Apr 2014
edited by sentairider42
Tvtropes Lost-And-Found entree:

Here is a scenario:
[scene setup; a young monster (for this example, a vampire) just attacked someone from the village that he lives in, and is about to be lynched and then mutilated (basically, imagine Akua's second flashback about Jasmine from Rosario + Vampire)]

{right as a villager is about to lynch the vampire, another person steps in between them} Lyncher: You. What do you think you're doing?

Interferer: Saving this kid from being ruthlessly murdered.

Lyncher: Murder, you say. That kid's a vampire. He attacked someone.

Interferer: Yeah, but he's only 6-years old, and scared of his own powers.

Lyncher: How does that matter, and how would you know that he didn't do it intentionally, and not because of "racial instincts"?

Interferer: Ok, 1) it matter a whole lot more than you think, and 2) because the person he attacked was me {shows the wound he got from the attack}

Lyncher: WHAT!?!? OK, again, how can you tell why he attacked you, and if you're the victim, why are you trying to protect him?

Interferer: I know because after I was attacked, I could see fear in his eyes as he ran off.
What is the trope for the person who was protecting the kid (specifically, the fact he's protecting the kid even though he was attacked, and that the reason for protecting him has to do with the attack itself)?
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MonaNaito
10:20:57 AM 13th Apr 2014
Check out Zombie Advocate (the page description mentions that the advocate may have been attacked by the person/creature they're protecting). See also the general case of Shaming the Mob.
ShanghaiSlave
01:17:08 PM 13th Apr 2014
sounds like a related case to "I Know You're in There Somewhere" Fight.
frosty
02:51:38 PM 13th Apr 2014
edited by frosty
He might be trying to invoke Sympathy for the Devil or avert Fantastic Racism, but I feel like that's pushing it.

On an unrelated note, your spoiler is worse than worthless, because you have nothing to tell people what it might be spoiling. Stick the show name or character name or something outside so people can tell if they want to read it.
sentairider42
09:33:30 AM 14th Apr 2014
edited by sentairider42
^oh, sorry about that.

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TargetmasterJoe
Medium: Western Animation
09:00:28 AM 14th Apr 2014
What's that trope where there is a door that has multiple locks and a character locks all of them for security reasons or something?

An example: In Ed, Edd n Eddy's Big Picture Show had a shot where the Eds are hiding in Eddy's brother's room and the door has different kinds of locks and Eddy locks them all for the sake of security.

In an episode of Ed Edd n Eddy, when Eddy goes crazy due to not having anyone to scam, Edd and Ed lure him to a secure room and Edd locks the door via multiple door locks.

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dbbolton
Medium: Western Animation
03:24:37 AM 14th Apr 2014
I have seen this trope on The Simpsons quite a few times. Basically, the character is shown against a black backdrop while neon signs fade past into the distance. It's usually like a time lapse to show how down and out the character is.

A perfect example is on the episode HOMR (http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Recap/TheSimpsonsS12E9HOMR) when Homer gets kicked out of the theatre, then signs for Lunkheadz, The Dum-Dum Club, and The Disney Store are shown.
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Bisected8
03:24:37 AM 14th Apr 2014
edited by Bisected8
Drunken Montage - non-drink related versions (like the Simpsons example you mentioned) are parodies of it.

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tsukaistarburst
Medium:
01:58:45 AM 14th Apr 2014
[08:03:13] Tsukaistarburst: you remember that moment [08:03:28] Tsukaistarburst: where two characters see some sort of horrible doom looming up in front of them [08:03:33] Tsukaistarburst: either metaphorically or literally [08:03:54] Tsukaistarburst: and one of them tends to clutch the other and go '...it looks like this is it!' [08:04:54] lonesie: ... that's not a page yet? [08:04:57] lonesie: omfg [08:05:08] Tsukaistarburst: as far as I am aware, no, it has never been

Am I wrong or right here? Have I missed it?
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DAN004
12:41:49 AM 14th Apr 2014
...huh?
Synchronicity
01:58:45 AM 14th Apr 2014
OP's asking if there's a trope for two characters clutching each other in the face of doom.

Security Cling?

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BradyLady
Medium: Live Action TV
11:49:36 PM 13th Apr 2014
edited by BradyLady
Was advised in Ask the Tropers to inquire here, because it isn't Ruleof Cool I'm thinking of. Good thing I did bring it up before adding this on the page.

Fonzie of Happy Days is mentioned under Ruleof Cool because he can get a vending machine to work by hitting it with his fist. What I was thinking of was more of a Double Standard. If any other character, perceived to be an idiot, says or does a certain thing, then it's taken as evidence of the character's idiocy. But a character like Fonzie can say or do exactly the same thing, and it's "cool."

I first noticed this when I saw almost the exact dialog playing out on both Gilligan's Island and Happy Days, with Gilligan and Fonzie saying almost identical lines. In both situations, the characters Gilligan and Fonzie had been caught in some compromising situation, and were rapid-firing implausible excuses, which the other characters didn't buy. Each time the Skipper or Mr. C shook their heads showing they didn't believe the excuse, Gilligan or Fonzie would offer another equally ridiculous one. Finally, in both scripts, the gag ended with Gilligan and Fonzie running out of ideas and saying, "OK, I'm open to suggestions." Audience reaction was expected to view Gilligan as an idiot, but Fonzie as clever and quick-witted.

Basically, it's "Anything A says or does is proof that he is an idiot. Anything B says or does is proof that he's cool, even if he's saying and doing the same things we consider A an idiot for."
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FuzzyWulfe
08:31:48 PM 6th Apr 2014
I can't for the life of me remember what the trope is called, but it does exist.

Bob: What if we poked it in the eye? Alice: Don't be stupid; that'll never work. Fonzie: I got it. Let's poke it in the eye. Alice: That's so brilliant. Why didn't you think of it, Bob?
DAN004
10:36:35 PM 6th Apr 2014
Double Standard is related?
BradyLady
12:37:45 AM 7th Apr 2014
edited by BradyLady
Double Standard is related. Fuzzy, what you're thinking of is Glad I Thought of It, but I don't think it's exactly the same. It's probably a subtrope of the one I'm talking about, which is also related to the Prejudice tropes. Since making the OP, I've come across Aggressive Categorism, which is connected too, I believe. Maybe it could even be it?
Chariset
09:15:54 AM 7th Apr 2014
edited by Chariset
Favoritism Flip Flop is where a character changes his opinions (and loyalties) to whatever the higher person on the totem pole likes.
BradyLady
04:40:00 PM 8th Apr 2014
edited by BradyLady
It's been pointed out to me that part of the reason for the differing character interpretation could be body language. Gilligan's facial expression, tone of voice, and physical stance all sent off "wimp" signals, while Fonzie in essentially the same dialog carried himself with much more confidence. Supposedly this earned him respect where Gilligan earned disdain. But by the same token, there are also these elements:

1. In the episode where Fonzie and several other characters all have to report for a draft physical, the sexy female army officer administering the stairstep cardiac test tells Fonzie to touch each step with his foot. Fonzie knows he's supposed to run up and down the staircase, but instead he stands where he is and casually touches each step with his foot. He has followed the letter of her orders. The giggling, flirting officer accepts this and scores him well. Ralph is up next and tries the same thing *with the same body language* whereupon the officer blows her whistle and yells at him. As he is running up and down the staircase, Ralph whimpers, "Why does it always work for HIM?" Pure Double Standard here?

2. Fonzie himself thought glasses were for nerds, not cool people, until he himself found that he needed glasses. Then all of a sudden glasses were cool. I think this episode was an Aesop so children watching at home would be encouraged to wear their own glasses. It was definitely in the vein of Very Special Episode, since Fonzie is never again seen wearing the glasses he so obviously needed in that one episode.

So, is "X is cool, so whatever he does is cool" its own trope? Or trope-worthy? And how about, "X gets to do it because he's cool, but if somebody else does it, it's stupid"? Is there a "Screw the rules, I'm cool" trope?
MetaFour
moderator
11:49:36 PM 13th Apr 2014
I think Butt Monkey also ties into this. Having the Double Standard work against a character that blatantly is a good way to establish that no one likes them.

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TompaDompa
Medium:
09:26:53 PM 13th Apr 2014
edited by TompaDompa
Is there a trope for explaining ignorance of something by admitting you know nothing about the wrong field?

An example would be in South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut, where a character says he's never heard of the Emancipation Proclamation because he doesn't listen to hip-hop.
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ShanghaiSlave
01:22:26 PM 13th Apr 2014
randomsurfer
09:26:53 PM 13th Apr 2014
edited by randomsurfer
Association Fallacy? In this case the character is assuming that hip-hop and the Emancipation Proclamation are both "black only" interests; he's white, and has never listened to hip-hop, therefore he has no knowledge of the Emancipation Proclamation. Furthermore the EP Rhymes on a Dime so it must be a rap lyric, right?

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Withoutaname
Medium:
06:22:55 PM 13th Apr 2014
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ctj-RDbTBMU

What device is used wherein the scene starts zoomed in and then pans out to reveal a mundane activity? For example, a CGI visualization of a bunch of circuits running (with attendant dramatic music) zoomed out to see a simple computer booting up. Commonly used as advertisements.
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DAN004
06:22:55 PM 13th Apr 2014

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emeriin
Medium:
04:45:54 PM 13th Apr 2014
Is there a trope for someone asking for something, getting it and then mocking the other person for giving him what he wants?
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Bisected8
03:38:49 PM 13th Apr 2014
edited by Bisected8
emeriin
04:45:54 PM 13th Apr 2014
Figured it might just be the second one, thank you.

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ZuTheSkunk
Medium:
01:19:09 PM 13th Apr 2014
Do we have a trope for when words, especially in titles on covers, are arranged in such a way that you instinctively read them in an incorrect order?
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DAN004
05:13:43 AM 13th Apr 2014
Such as?
ZuTheSkunk
05:21:25 AM 13th Apr 2014
A good example would be this: http://tinyurl.com/nsxl5lq

The title is supposed to be "Kao the Kangaroo: Round 2", but instead you WILL read it as "Kao Round 2 the Kangaroo".
DAN004
07:54:17 AM 13th Apr 2014
ShanghaiSlave
01:19:09 PM 13th Apr 2014
Misplaced-Names Poster.

no reason it can't apply to titles, though it would probably shoehorning by then.

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Chabal2
Medium:
02:00:44 AM 13th Apr 2014
What's the trope for a two-person monologue? As in, Alice is exposing her ideas, and Bob is only there to say "Yes" and "You're right", and could be replaced with any character, like a non-Take That Straw Man. Or, if Alice is giving a Reason You Suck Speech, Bob is only there to start saying sentences so Alice can interrupt him with yet another devastating argument (that one is closer to Straw M An).
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Synchronicity
02:00:44 AM 13th Apr 2014

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eroock
Medium:
08:10:54 PM 12th Apr 2014
edited by eroock
Is there a trope for when the Butt Monkey or Ditz character featurs a funny overbite with bad teeth?
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DAN004
08:58:47 PM 11th Apr 2014
xanderiskander
12:24:22 PM 12th Apr 2014
edited by xanderiskander
^British Teeth is explicitly a stereotype of British people and it only applies if the character is British. It has nothing to do with being The Ditz or a Butt Monkey
eroock
03:27:11 PM 12th Apr 2014
Bump
FuzzyWulfe
08:10:54 PM 12th Apr 2014
Facial Profiling should be it, though it's the supertrope for all the racial appearance tropes. When you see a character with the features you describe, you know they are The Ditz.

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bsrg
Medium:
07:04:56 PM 12th Apr 2014
Is there a trope for when a vet is healing/operating/doing doctory things on people (usually because no doctor was available)?
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Bisected8
06:55:57 PM 12th Apr 2014
edited by Bisected8
Closest Thing We Got or Open Heart Dentistry. Depending on the exact situation.
bsrg
07:04:56 PM 12th Apr 2014
Thanks! I'm suprised that there isn't one specifically for vets, I can say 3 examples from the top of my head with vets and none with dentists or the like.

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DAN004
Medium:
06:11:39 PM 12th Apr 2014
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Freezer
05:42:40 PM 12th Apr 2014
Acropolis refers to the city/buildings. Humans refers more to the society itself. There's overlap, but that's the dividing ling.
nrjxll
06:11:39 PM 12th Apr 2014
Also, an Advanced Ancient Acropolis doesn't have to have been built by humans.

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TompaDompa
Medium:
03:50:32 PM 12th Apr 2014
Is there a trope for turning down promotions/authority/power? I couldn't find it on These Tropes Have Been Promoted or Rejection Index.

It's not Refusal of the Call (that's about turning down a Call to Adventure), nor is it Reluctant Ruler (because then you didn't actually refuse).

Or is it simply some kind of authority/promotion trope (which one depending on the circumstances, I suppose), but defied?
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Bisected8
03:27:14 PM 12th Apr 2014
Cincinnatus seems pretty close, but not quite (it's more about accepting power then giving it up).
DAN004
03:31:41 PM 12th Apr 2014
randomsurfer
03:42:10 PM 12th Apr 2014
TompaDompa
03:50:32 PM 12th Apr 2014
Thank you randomsurfer, that looks just like what I was looking for. Odd that we didn't already have it, though.

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InspectorGadget
Medium:
02:38:53 PM 12th Apr 2014
In sci-fi there's this universal theme that every thing has to be a hexagon. Is there a trope for when sci-fi movies make most structures and surfaces hexagonic to make them look cooler?
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TompaDompa
02:38:53 PM 12th Apr 2014

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PinkCelebi
Medium: Videogame
01:08:10 PM 12th Apr 2014
edited by PinkCelebi
A variation of Kaizo Trap, where you can kill the enemy just after it kills you because the game is running for a while after your death.

An example is the Dive Man from Rockman 4 Minus Infinity

You can shoot a weapon and fall into pit to get yourself killed, only for your weapon to kill him just before the game goes onto next life (if any). You still respawn at the checkpoint, though.

PS. Also, you can get killed by his Water Cutter and still kill him. Even with the Toad Spell which activates after your death.
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crazysamaritan
01:08:10 PM 12th Apr 2014
Just include it on Kaizo Trap. Fighting Games (PvP) can have it work both ways for players: win after being defeated, or defeated after "winning".

The other thing to include it on is Pyrrhic Victory.

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TimDH426
Medium:
09:42:32 AM 12th Apr 2014
Do we have a name for the trope where someone's house gets suddenly shot up? I've seen this in different movies and TV shows. Usually it serves to drive home the point of a good character trapped living in a bad gang-infested neighborhood. Specific examples I can remember are from Grand Canyon and Gran Torino. I would think movies of the Boyz N the Hood genre would probably have scenes like this, too.

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Biagio
Medium:
08:19:51 AM 12th Apr 2014
I actually have two questions but due to it being so late and i'm tired I can't remember one so if i'm allowed to i'll reply to this one when I can remember it. But for now I was wondering if two Dramatic examples fit in Immune to Drugs

1. On Criminal Minds the Unsubs M.O. involves injecting his victims with high doses of narcotics. However unbeknownst to him one of his victims was a former junkie so what would knock out or kill a normal person just made him briefly pass ou and wake up in the Unsub's trunk which he then kicks his way out of and escapes.

2. Replace "wake up in a trunk" with "wake up in a human canvas stitched to multiple laminated{lacquered} Corpses and "kicks his way out" with "tears himself free" and you have an episode of Hannibal.
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Chabal2
08:19:51 AM 12th Apr 2014
edited by Chabal2
Acquired Poison Immunity would be a bit closer.

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thainen
Medium:
01:55:46 AM 12th Apr 2014
Seen this a million times. An Epic Race is on, and the heroes are winning, but they see one of their competitors in a deadly danger. So heroes sacrifice the victory to save the other guys' lives (loosing time or even being disqualified). Is there a special trope for this, or it goes under something like Good Samaritan?
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Freezer
07:20:39 AM 11th Apr 2014
thainen
01:55:46 AM 12th Apr 2014
My, don't we have some really unexpected trope names here! Thanks!

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sentairider42
Medium:
09:35:32 PM 11th Apr 2014
edited by sentairider42
What's the difference between Cosmic Plaything, Chew Toy, and Butt Monkey?
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Bisected8
04:32:05 PM 11th Apr 2014
edited by Bisected8
  • The Butt Monkey is the character who tends to be the one to suffer when the plot or a gag calls for it (note that there's a YMMV variation, Designated Monkey, for when the audience decide this is unfair).
  • The Cosmic Plaything is a character whom the universe itself is explicitly screwing with. Reality itself (or whatever controls it) seems to warp to make life difficult for them.
  • The Chew Toy is a character who's constant suffering is what makes them popular with the audience (contrast with The Woobie, who the audience sympathise with because of their suffering). They might be a Butt Monkey, Cosmic Plaything or neither.

For example;

  • If Alice is always the victim of Bob and Clare's pranks, she's the Butt Monkey.
  • If Alice is always being hit by any prank anyone does no matter how contrived it has to be for it to happen and she believes that the universe (or God or whathaveyou) is actively setting it up, then she's a Cosmic Plaything.
  • If Alice is a popular character with the audience because she's so fun to see get pranked, she's The Chew Toy.
sentairider42
09:35:32 PM 11th Apr 2014
Got it. Thanks.

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Biagio
Medium: Live Action TV
02:57:35 PM 11th Apr 2014
I looked under Death By Irony, Karmic Death, and even Just Deserts and none of them seem to fit. It's when the villain is built up to be a complete monster and the fans want him dead. But it seems like he's either gotten away with it and fled the country never to be extradited, or arrested and will probably get a much lesser sentence then he deserves. Then in the last minute of the show we cut back to the villain after we see the heroes wrap up their day and the villain gets what he deserves.

Example 1. Simmons from Person of Interest shoots and kills Carter and wounds John. Fuscoe manages to track him down and after a fight Simmons dares Fuscoe to kill him and instead Fuscoe arrests Simmons. At the very end of the show the affably evil is shown in Simmon's hospital room and after a brief speech about how he liked Carter and it was his duty now to solve the problem that was Simmons he watches happily as his bodyguard smothers Simmons to death. Cue credits.

2. In Intelligence a mexican drug lord kidnaps a semator's daughter and her best friend to try and blackmail the senator into not letting a particular bill pass. The drug lord puts one girl in a chair with her hands behind her back holding a grenade that will drop if she passes out. He abducts one of the main characters but since the CIA are doing business with him he's considered untouchable. Then in the end of the show he's shown in a bathtub when the boss of the main characters calls him up to tell him he should have taken the deal. He tells her that if the CIA wants to keep doing business they either have to do it his way or get someone else. She tells them they already have gotten someone else. Cue the hooker in the bathtub behind him stabbing and killing him and the boss smiling hanging up and heads off to go about her business.

And the third and last example I can think of off hand is when Dexter's pyromaniac girlfriend tries to burn him, astor, and codey alive in a studio apartment. She flees town. Cut to her in france or venice at a hotel admiring the view when Dexter comes up behind her, ketamines her, and then kills and disposes of her.
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DAN004
02:57:35 PM 11th Apr 2014

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supernintendo128
Medium:
02:42:43 PM 11th Apr 2014
Is there a trope where the creator decides he can't work on his creation anymore?
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Bisected8
02:34:35 PM 11th Apr 2014
supernintendo128
02:42:43 PM 11th Apr 2014
Works for me.

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