• 1 Sep 17th, 2017 at 2:02AM
    Videogame
    Lastest Reply: 17th Sep, 2017 11:51:10 PM
    Is there a trope for someone (good aligned) who has a generally mischievous and sassy personality/sense of humor, but it's more playful verbal teasing than anything, so not a practical joker, and not overly energetic, or flirty either (and they are not a love interest in the game, more of a mentor) ? Incidentally the character quickly gets serious when needed, is supportive, and is very concerned/worried towards others when there's danger. Reply
  • 1 Sep 16th, 2017 at 5:05AM
    Videogame
    Lastest Reply: 16th Sep, 2017 09:04:52 AM
    So, it's not quite an Easter Egg, it's not quite Dev Team Thinks Of Everything and it's not quite Freeze-Frame Bonus, although I think that's closest. This is when the dev team go the extra mile, and put in subtle things that you might not notice at first, but when you do you think "Oh that's clever."

    For example, in Kingdom Hearts, when you go to Captain Hook's ship, you occasionally have to fight your shadow, and sure enough, I looked down and Sora's shadow is no longer beneath him (but Donald and Goofy's still are).

    Do we have a trope (well, more of a trivia) for this? Reply
  • 0 Sep 15th, 2017 at 9:09PM
    Videogame
    Is there a trope for items that apply the appearance of a weapon or armor on top of what is equipped, allowing players to customize their appearance without having to mess up their stats?

    Examples include Weapon Camos from Phantasy Star Online 2, Glamours from Final Fantasy XIV, and QQ Bangs from Dragonball Xenoverse 2. Reply
  • 0 Sep 11th, 2017 at 8:08AM
    Videogame
    For example, the Pokémon Stadium games aren't needed anymore now that the mainline Pokémon games use models, and especially now that the Nintendo Switch has been released with its HD capabilities. Reply
  • 2 Sep 9th, 2017 at 5:05AM
    Videogame
    Lastest Reply: 9th Sep, 2017 08:06:29 AM
    Is there a trope for "stupid rules, they get in the way of me saving the universe through the power of I-am-awesome"? Because I'm finding more and more of those stereotypical stories lately. Like, I'm a law abiding cityzen, but if I don't get my way, because laws, and understanding how society works, then it's not that I'm wrong, the system is wrong, and I am in my right to whine and be a little spoiled brat about it...

    Examples: Monkeyman Wiston's backstory in the videogame Overwatch. Sheppard in the first Mass Effect, all interactions with the Council. Both are examples of videogames but I'm pretty sure it's a movies and series thing too.

    - Since I'm at it I might as well add another inquiry: Isn't there a term for a member of a band of misfits whose role is to advise people? but are not the mentor? Basically, their ability is being super-wise. They remind you of what is reality or what's good about the universe and might, rather than give you the answers, just ask the right question. Like Book, the preacher in Firefly. Or Shao Lin in Captain Simian and the Space Monkeys. (... is that too obscure a reference? Well, I hope you know what I mean.)

    Thanks in advance. Reply
  • 2 Sep 8th, 2017 at 3:03AM
    Videogame
    Lastest Reply: 8th Sep, 2017 07:02:49 PM
    Example: In Who Framed Roger Rabbit there's a 1-800 number that you're supposed to call. As in actually call, using a landline or cell. Reply

      Breaking the Fourth Wall at the time. Guide Dang It! and That One Puzzle now.

      555 has a few listed "aversions"—as in, real phone numbers appearing in a game, and they actually connect to something relevant if you call them in Real Life. But not many that are really required to advance.

      Also related to the "Puzzle method" of Copy Protection. Also this is the bread and butter of Alternate Reality Games. I think this may be a Missing Supertrope. I can think of some other examples off the top of my head: The X-Men game for Sega Genesis requires you to perform a soft reset on the console before you can enter the final level. Metal Gear Solid 2 had that boss who hijacked your controller input, so you had to move the controller to a different port. In Fez you have to use a smartphone with a QR code reader to solve certain puzzles.
  • 1 Sep 2nd, 2017 at 10:10PM
    Videogame
    Lastest Reply: 3rd Sep, 2017 11:00:10 AM
    What's the trope for a boss who gradually gets harder? i.e not like Turns Red more like a boss who say, gets a little harder with every hit. (Example: the final boss on Sonic the Hedgehog 4 episode 2) Reply

      Personally, I'd say that still falls under Turns Red, just that it happens multiple times over the course of the battle. Happens like 8 times throughout fighting the Hag 1 in Banjo-Tooie, for instance.
  • 4 Aug 30th, 2017 at 10:10AM
    Videogame
    Lastest Reply: 30th Aug, 2017 11:33:57 AM
    What's the video game trope for when each member of a party has a unique ability? Like bolstering the health of party members who stand next to them, or giving you more time to finish a level? Reply

      Cast Speciation; Superhero Speciation for powers.

      ^ I don't think either of those fit. I'm looking for a trope that describes every party member having an ability that comes into play during the game, not each party member having an ability that is different from other party members. (My bad, I should have been more specific.)

      Plot Tailored to the Party?

      ^ That is a trope about a plot being set up to cater to characters, not the characters themselves.
  • 2 Aug 22nd, 2017 at 1:01AM
    Videogame
    Lastest Reply: 22nd Aug, 2017 01:57:15 AM
    In videogames when a character is an unstoppable juggernaut when playable, but suddenly become very vulnerable as an NPC or in a cutscene.

    Some examples (SPOILERS AHEAD): Roland's death at the hands of Jack in Borderlands 2. Nisha and Wilhelm being relatively easy to kill NP Cs in Borderlands 2 despite being the protagonists in Borderlands The Pre Sequel. Sergeant Johnson's death in Halo 3. Kat's death from a single needle rifle round in Halo Reach. Jason easily being knocked around by Vaas and Hoyt during cutscenes despite being an unstoppable juggernaut in game in Far Cry 3. Alyx Vance taking multiple gunshot and explosion wounds in Half Life 2 but getting severe injuries from being stabbed by a hunter in HL 2 Episode 2. Adrian Shephard being an ustoppable juggernaut as an HECU Marine in Half Life Opposing Force, but his fellow HECU Marines easily dying.

    This trope can also occasionally be inverted when a character is nearly unkillable as an NPC but very much killable as a player character.

    Some examples: The Arbiter (Halo 3). Unkillable as an NPC, killable as a player character. Captain Price in Co D 4. Reply
  • 0 Aug 16th, 2017 at 3:03AM
    Videogame
    When game doesn't allow you to proceed unless you win, even if it's not an important story related battle.

    Example: Most of the battles in Pokemon. There are few rival battles (like the first fight with Silver or Blue) that allow the game to continue regardless of outcome, but that's about it.

    Like jeez, I get it, you won; now get out of my way, I need to go to the next Gym and get a Badge. Your team just happens to counter mine; the Gym Leader is meanwhile a Poor, Predictable Rock (most of the time, anyway). Reply
  • 5 Aug 8th, 2017 at 7:07PM
    Videogame
    Lastest Reply: 11th Aug, 2017 02:45:39 AM
    Is there a trope for when devs add unneeded details into games off-screen? Like what the Youtube series Boundary Break deals with. They can't be seen in-detail in-game or are outright out-of-bounds. Reply

      Easter Egg?

      The Dev Team Thinks Of Everything?

      ^^ No, it's off-screen or unviewable under normal measures.

      If those details are added just in case the player glitches their way through the game or something like that, it might be Developers' Foresight.

      ^^ I think Easter Egg still applies.
  • 3 Aug 3rd, 2017 at 4:04AM
    Videogame
    Lastest Reply: 10th Aug, 2017 08:05:01 AM
    Is there a trope for cinematics which start when the player idle on the title screen? They usually show parts of gameplay and were very common during the golden age of arcade games. Reply
  • 1 Aug 6th, 2017 at 11:11AM
    Videogame
    Lastest Reply: 8th Aug, 2017 07:18:17 PM
    Okay I wanted to suggest an edit about Dusk Lycanroc in the Locked Pages thread(Pokemon USUM's Work and YMMV pages are locked, though I am considering visiting the Broken Base cleanup thread about that) but the thing is, I don't know of any trope that fits (well besides Early-Bird Cameo but that's more relevant to the anime).

    The thing is. I don't know if there isn't any trope that fits this pokemon specifically. Are there tropes about a twilight theme, an orange wolf or a design that seems to be a middle of the road synthesis of two other designs (That isn't Patchwork Kids or Fusion Dance)? Reply
  • 5 Aug 6th, 2017 at 8:08PM
    Videogame
    Lastest Reply: 7th Aug, 2017 07:44:20 PM
    Is there a trope for when players can unlock major features in a game through gameplay? For example:

    • What Extra Credits calls "unfolding games", in which the player's objective is to unlock more mechanics.

    • In Awaken Online, the titular game launched with only a human player race and a tiny number of the most generic classes. But the possibilities are known only to the AI game engine and have to be discovered through emergent play. The protagonist, Jason, is the first to discover the Necromancer class. And when he conquers a city, the city becomes an Undead base and the race is unlocked for new players.

    What I'm looking for isn't Emergent Gameplay itself but a system that rewards EG. Reply

      Unlockable Content should be the supertrope at the least. Possibilities are T Ime To Unlock More True Potential, Full Potential Upgrade, or Double Unlock.

      Hmmm.

      Guess this is a job for TLP.

      If I'm reading this correctly, you're looking for "Content that can be unlocked or awarded via Emergent Gameplay". That sounds like The Dev Team Thinks of Everything.

      There's some of that in Awaken Online, where the AI game engine can and does invade players' minds, but certainly not in unfolding games, which are tiny in order to keep the options manageable. And TDTTOE also isn't about the results of emergent play or thorough enough planning to seem emergent or precognitive, just about emergence or massive planning..... existing in the work.

      But hey, that's another trope I needed to add to the AO page. XD

      If what you're looking for is an intentional feature, that's The Dev Team Thinks of Everything. If the game devs didn't intend for X action to happen, that's Good Bad Bugs. Some actual game examples of what you mean might help narrow things down.
  • 1 Aug 5th, 2017 at 3:03PM
    Videogame
    Lastest Reply: 5th Aug, 2017 05:42:02 PM
    In most fighting games or shooting games there would be this one area where you enter a room and you must fight wave after wave of enemies. I'm wondering which trope fits this description Reply
  • 1 Aug 5th, 2017 at 7:07AM
    Videogame
    Lastest Reply: 5th Aug, 2017 09:15:27 AM
    When the protagonists for some arbitrary reason are given the task of (re)developing a city or similar as part of a sidequest that usually spans the entire game. This usually has little to do with the plot and the protagonists are definetly not city planners. Examples that come to mind are Xenoblade Chronicles, Bravely Default, Fire Emblem Fates and Etrian Odyssey 2 Untold. Do we have that here somewhere? Reply
  • 1 Jul 29th, 2017 at 6:06PM
    Videogame
    Lastest Reply: 30th Jul, 2017 08:38:15 PM
    I'm looking for a trope where a creator lies about the genre of a minigame. For instance, in the PSP adaptation of the Geronimo Stilton: Kingdom of Fantasy series (this was basically Professor Layton with a license slapped on it), there was a minigame that claimed to be a rhythm game, but it was actually more like Simon. To add insult to injury, the game has an ACTUAL rhythm game later on that's never called such! What's that called? Reply
  • 2 Jul 30th, 2017 at 9:09AM
    Videogame
    Lastest Reply: 30th Jul, 2017 11:33:09 AM
    Games like Skyrim where you have the iron helmet, which is one of the weakest items in the game but is also one of the best looking. So you have to decide whether you want a cool helmet or more protection. Reply

      I think that is Cool but Inefficient and Boring but Practical

      Seems like those tropes should be the ends on a sliding scale.
  • 0 Jul 28th, 2017 at 6:06PM
    Videogame
    When characters dissolve into pixels or squares, usually after teleportation or reforming Reply
  • 1 Jul 17th, 2017 at 11:11AM
    Videogame
    Lastest Reply: 17th Jul, 2017 10:23:46 PM
    The character is a 12-year old college graduate with a doctorate in VR technology but doesn't realize that, in a swimming contest, using a float ring would only slow her down (and does despite calling it her secret weapon). What would be a good trope for that to fall under? Reply
  • 0 Jul 13th, 2017 at 7:07PM
    Videogame
    I'm looking for a trope where a creator lies about the genre of a minigame. For instance, in the PSP adaptation of the Geronimo Stilton: Kingdom of Fantasy series (this was basically Professor Layton with a license slapped on it), there was a minigame that claimed to be a rhythm game, but it was actually more like Simon. This is pretty egregious, as the game has an ACTUAL rhythm game later on! Reply
  • 0 Jul 13th, 2017 at 5:05PM
    Videogame
    Primarily a video game thing, but is there a trope for a reward that's given to everyone who completes a task but because of its specialized usefulness it can be anything from a Disc-One Nuke (for characters who get the most out of it) to Vendor Trash (because it's effectively useless). Reply
  • 1 Jul 2nd, 2017 at 5:05AM
    Videogame
    Lastest Reply: 2nd Jul, 2017 07:38:49 AM
    I've been playing this turn-based game where there are characters who automatically cast another attack when an enemy dies from the previous hit, to the point that the attacker can finish off the entire opposing team.

    It goes like this: Enemy team has 4 members. An attacker on the player's team finishes off one of the enemies. They then automatically attack again. If no enemies die from that attack, they stop. If another enemy dies, they go on.

    Do we already have a trope for that? Reply
  • 1 Jun 30th, 2017 at 7:07PM
    Videogame
    Lastest Reply: 1st Jul, 2017 02:28:26 PM
    Is there a trope for when NP Cs in a particular game frequently ask you to do the most mundane, inconsequential, or riskless tasks for them? Seriously, if you lived in the world of many computer RP Gs, the sheer quantity of apparent incompetence you'd be constantly surrounded by would drive you nuts. Oh, hey, could you kill this raccoon that's been in our trash? Well, yeah, but you could just keep an eye out yourself and take care of it. Yes, I guess I could deliver this to your friend in the next town over, but isn't there a postal system for this kind of thing? Reply
  • 0 Jun 30th, 2017 at 3:03PM
    Videogame
    You know how in some games, the credits show the main character walking, and then other characters slowly join behind them, and by the end they're all together? Is there a name for that? One example that comes to mind is Mario Kart DS, although that's Mario driving by the other characters, not all of them together. Reply
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