• 2 Apr 18th, 2018 at 11:11PM
    Videogame
    Lastest Reply: 19th Apr, 2018 03:54:13 PM
    More of a piece of trivia than a trope...

    I Swear We Have This... Usually, because of First Installment Wins, characters in the sequel will remember it as an epic. But, because Actionized Sequel is a thing, the following installment is usually much more epic. For example, Captain Kirk is remembered as an amazing hero in the Star Trek spinoffs, but he never took part in full-on wars or defended the whole of humanity to the level Picard and Sisko did. Or, as applied to videogames, the storyline of the first Warcraft game is often mentioned as this great war in the sequels, but thanks to the limited technology of the time, it's incredibly low-key compared to the third game. Reply
  • 3 Apr 17th, 2018 at 4:04AM
    Videogame
    Lastest Reply: 18th Apr, 2018 08:18:08 PM
    In video games where there is a rarity system of loot (i.e. Normal / Uncommon / Rare / Unique / Legendary or Bronze / Silver / Gold), what trope applies to an item that is at the lowest-tier or rarity, extremely common, but when used, it is very beneficial to the player, so strong that they may use this very item in their entire playthrough of the game.

    But I guess this is not a Magikarp Power (correct me if I'm wrong) as the item does not require a leveling process Reply
  • 1 Apr 17th, 2018 at 7:07AM
    Videogame
    Lastest Reply: 17th Apr, 2018 10:03:07 AM
    I recently noticed something in several video games: The last level (or one of the last levels) is on the moon, often unexpectedly after a plot twist. I was wondering if that qualifies as a trope or whether we already have this one.

    Examples for games like that (spoiler warning):

    Majora's Mask , Portal 2, Mario Odyssey, Yuri's Revenge (penultimate mission).

    Maybe someone knows more video games in which that happens? Reply
  • 2 Apr 14th, 2018 at 2:02PM
    Videogame
    Lastest Reply: 14th Apr, 2018 09:15:14 PM
    The player has no way of knowing so they have to guess, and maybe reload a save if they want to try the other path. Reply
  • 2 Apr 10th, 2018 at 11:11AM
    Videogame
    Lastest Reply: 10th Apr, 2018 11:19:55 PM
    What's the trope for when a video game gives you multiple ways that could theoretically be used to solve a puzzle in real life but requires you to use a specific one and might not even let you use the same solution twice even though there's no reason why it shouldn't work?

    For example, your character can normally pick locks on doors, but on mission-critical doors you're instead required to go find the key with no explanation given for why you can't just pick that lock.

    Similarly, in Far Cry 5, to get into one Prepper Stash you need to go across the river and use a sniper rifle to shoot the lock on the door from long range. Another Prepper Stash forces you to find a key to unlock to door even though you can see into the room through a barred window and can easily shoot the lock like you did with the first stash. Reply
  • 0 Apr 8th, 2018 at 9:09AM
    Videogame
    This is primarily a video game trope, though I can imagine it showing up in other mediums. Any skill or ability that gives you a bonus on killing an enemy. Do we have a trope like that? Reply
  • 2 Apr 3rd, 2018 at 12:12PM
    Videogame
    Lastest Reply: 3rd Apr, 2018 02:00:32 PM
    Is there a trope for when a video game genre becomes so prone to Follow the Leader that people play clones but don't remember the original title? Reply
  • 2 Mar 30th, 2018 at 2:02PM
    Videogame
    Lastest Reply: 1st Apr, 2018 10:56:34 PM
    I just read about an in-game prison in Final Fantasy XIV, Mordion Gaol, where GMs warp players who have been breaking the rules so they can discuss the infractions with them.

    Is there a trope for this? Reply
  • 3 Mar 24th, 2018 at 8:08AM
    Videogame
    Lastest Reply: 24th Mar, 2018 03:06:02 PM
    You start a game and you're given immediately access to what appear to be decent weapons. You flail through enemies left and right like they were made of wet tissue paper in a massive power fantasy. And right when you start feeling invincible and wondering why this game is so easy, up pops an enemy which barely takes any damage at all from your not-so-awesome-now weapons and proceeds to wipe the floor with you and your whole party. You reload and continue playing with far more respect for the world's nasty creatures and for the game as a whole.

    Example (which brought me here, actually): Fallout 2's Wanamingos. You get to the first big town after wiping the floor with low-level critters and petty criminals, you acquire metal armor and your first assault rifle, you're feeling pretty damn unstoppable - and in an early mission you come across these powerhouses with thick armored skin and absurdly damaging tentacles. You get effortlessly slaughtered, reload your save, and tackle the rest of the game with newfound humility. Reply
  • 3 Mar 24th, 2018 at 8:08AM
    Videogame
    Lastest Reply: 24th Mar, 2018 03:06:02 PM
    You start a game and you're given immediately access to what appear to be decent weapons. You flail through enemies left and right like they were made of wet tissue paper in a massive power fantasy. And right when you start feeling invincible and wondering why this game is so easy, up pops an enemy which barely takes any damage at all from your not-so-awesome-now weapons and proceeds to wipe the floor with you and your whole party. You reload and continue playing with far more respect for the world's nasty creatures and for the game as a whole.

    Example (which brought me here, actually): Fallout 2's Wanamingos. You get to the first big town after wiping the floor with low-level critters and petty criminals, you acquire metal armor and your first assault rifle, you're feeling pretty damn unstoppable - and in an early mission you come across these powerhouses with thick armored skin and absurdly damaging tentacles. You get effortlessly slaughtered, reload your save, and tackle the rest of the game with newfound humility. Reply
  • 2 Mar 23rd, 2018 at 6:06AM
    Videogame
    Lastest Reply: 23rd Mar, 2018 09:44:52 AM
    Looking for an audience reaction (or trivia trope) that observes a videogame that's by all accounts decent and functional, but its popularity is screwed over by the player environment it operates in. For example, a first-person shooter releases and critics like it, but is ultimately quickly passed over by players because there are more appealing and competitive options out there (more specifically, the highly volatile PC playerbase). Reply
  • 0 Mar 21st, 2018 at 7:07PM
    Videogame
    Do we have this trope? What I am talking about is games that stay on a special screen after beating, and the only way to leave it is to close the game or shut down the console. This was more common in older games like Super Mario World, but newer games like Undertale have also done this. After you beat the game, rather than take you back to the hub world or title screen, you are instead put on a screen that says "The End" or "Thanks for playing", etc. No matter what button you press on your controller, you can't leave this screen. the reset button on the console is the only way out. Reply
  • 2 Mar 19th, 2018 at 8:08AM
    Videogame
    Lastest Reply: 20th Mar, 2018 01:00:29 AM
    You're playing an otherwise average action-adventure game, and suddenly a town you've saved asks for money, and errands, which they use to fix up the place, changing the aesthetic - and more importantly, upgrade the item shops? It's not a full Simulation Game, it's not even a Mini-Game; you just give them money and stuff, and the town is fixed up while you go about your adventures. What's this mechanic called? Reply

      An Interior Designer Is You?

      Not really. You don't really decide what the town looks like, you just give them money to fix the place up and when you come back later, the shops are better. I was thinking of Terranigma, where you can't get the best items unless you go around completing quests to upgrade the cities, but the Assassin's Creed series after the first works as well, where you collect rent from your properties and use it to upgrade shops so they carry better items. More like An Investor Is You.
  • 1 Mar 18th, 2018 at 5:05PM
    Videogame
    Lastest Reply: 19th Mar, 2018 02:53:51 AM
    The player progressively eliminates members of a security team - most likely during a stealth mission - and nobody seems to find it strange that suddenly there's a lot fewer people with guns around, or that nobody seems to be regularly reporting their status. Extreme cases can see whole levels wiped clean of security patrols with nary an alarm being raised.

    I can think of a few related tropes, but not one directly describing this. Do we have it? Reply
  • 1 Mar 18th, 2018 at 5:05PM
    Videogame
    Lastest Reply: 19th Mar, 2018 02:53:51 AM
    The player progressively eliminates members of a security team - most likely during a stealth mission - and nobody seems to find it strange that suddenly there's a lot fewer people with guns around, or that nobody seems to be regularly reporting their status. Extreme cases can see whole levels wiped clean of security patrols with nary an alarm being raised.

    I can think of a few related tropes, but not one directly describing this. Do we have it? Reply
  • 0 Mar 15th, 2018 at 7:07PM
    Videogame
    If a game has something that was removed with patches and other updates after it's come out, is this its own trope, or is it under Dummied Out? (It doesn't matter if modders bring it back or not; the idea is that it was present in the game when it first came out, then it was intentionally made unavailable.)

    The one I'm thinking of is in Splatoon 2: There are particular pairs of colors handed out to the two teams in each match. However, there is a pair of colors that hasn't been seen since about one month after the game came out. Throughout both it and the previous game, also, several combinations of stages and modes were removed from online play, one by one, when they were discovered to be unbalanced. Reply
  • 1 Mar 13th, 2018 at 6:06AM
    Videogame
    Lastest Reply: 13th Mar, 2018 09:16:31 AM
    Two characters can't reach an agreement or understanding via words, so they decide to test their convictions and reach an understanding through battle. What is the trope for that? Reply
  • 0 Mar 12th, 2018 at 4:04PM
    Videogame
    Most games with multiple characters have a system where the character gains Experience Points and gains levels after certain thresholds. However, especially on Mobile Phone Games, developers have started doing a thing where there's more than one way to power up your character. I think that Heroes Charge pioneered this system, so I'll use its terminology as an example:
    • Character Level: gained via EXP. Old Hat.
    • "Evolution Level" / Star Rating / Rarity: Heroes Charge is a game where you pick up multiple copies of the same character (or, technically, multiple "soul stones" or whatever that allow you to recruit the character). Once you have enough extras, you can increase the character's stats by infusing them with the extra Soul Stones. In Heroes Charge, doing this increases how many STR / AGI / HP / etc the character gains every time they gain a level.
    • "Promotions" / Color: these are accomplished by finding additional macguffins out in the game world. In Heroes Charge they are pieces of equipment, but I've seen Follow the Leader rip-offs use magical runes instead. Once you finish equipping the character with all the EQ you need, the character consumes the EQ (?!) and immediately gains a one-time boost to their stats. Additionally, this changes the color of their portrait, typically along the color/rarity combos first laid out by WoW and Diablo.

    In Heroes Charge, this goes hand-in-hand with their main Revenue-Enhancing Device: Forced Level-Grinding. All of the Green Rocks described above are Random Drops from campaign levels, which you typically have to repeat over and over. To facilitate this, Heroes Charge introduced "Auto Battle": once you've beaten the campaign level thoroughly enough (3 stars), you can just press a button and have the game AI its way through the level. Heck, sometimes it doesn't even bother showing the fights; it just rolls up the loot and saves time!

    I'm not sure which came first, "Auto Battle" or this idea of Multiple Character-Level Axes (as in, "the plural of axis"), but they go together really well; more importantly, they've become some of the most fundamental game-design tropes in the mobile-games space.

    Do we have tropes for any of the things I've described? Reply
  • 0 Mar 11th, 2018 at 11:11PM
    Videogame
    Is there a trope for moment when, as the title describes, is so simple you wouldn't think to try it?

    I was wondering if this trope existed after I went through this: At the beginning of a game I start out in a locked room and I need to find a way out. Maybe I needed to lure a guard close enough then k.o. him (nope, guard is completely unresponsive) Maybe the key is hidden in some food as a callback to the previous game! (nope) After a while of looking around, I notice the window is unlocked. All I had to do was go out the window onto a ledge then into another open window a couple feet away.

    Another example (off the top of my head) Often times in games of dnd (or similar tabletop roleplaying games) there will be some puzzle that the players will go off in wild directions of how to solve. Often the puzzle will just have a simple answer or, in rare occasions, everything in that room is basically a decoration and all they had to do was open the door that didn't even have a lock on it.

    Can apply to other forms of media with the main characters trying to figure out how to solve a problem and, eventually, somebody decides to state the obvious solution that nobody else even considered because they thought it would be way to easy only for it to actually work. Reply
  • 11 Mar 9th, 2018 at 12:12PM
    Videogame
    Lastest Reply: 10th Mar, 2018 02:37:07 AM
    Do we have one for games where the player has to start from the beginning if they lose, but they retain certain resources or character levels, which makes their next attempt easier?

    • Recettear: If you fail to pay back the debt, Recette wakes up on Day 1 Week 1 and finds that it was All Just a Dream, but the player keeps all their levels and inventory.
    • If you fail in Into the Breach you have to play from the beginning in a new timeline, but you select a pilot to send back in time via a wormhole, allowing you to retain all their skills on your next play through.
    Reply

      Anti-Frustration Features.

      That's not quite it; it's less about not annoying the player, and more how the game's structured.

      Macrogame?

      Anti-Frustration Features is also about the means of lessening the difficulty with each failure, which is exactly what you are asking for.

      But it also entails modifying the rules to cut the player some slack, whereas here it's clearly baked into the games' intended experience.

      AFF covers it in about the same way it covers Check Point or Save Point.

      Macrogame is definitely the super trope, but I was after something more specific.

      Seconding Macrogame; Rogue Legacy is a great example- every time you die you respawn as the previous character's heir with the money they collected, which you use to buy upgrades and gear, gradually improving the stats and options to choose from each time you start a new run.

      Twinking feels pretty close, but the game's basically letting you do it.

      ^ That's basically the idea of the "iterative gameplay" form of Macrogame. A good test is if it's designed so that you have to go through at least a couple cycles of Early Game Hell before you've twinked enough starting advantage to make real headway.

      That sounds about what I was thinking of then, thanks. =3

      I have to ask, what's the distinction between Macrogame and New Game+? (New Game+ lists Rogue Legacy as an example, and Rogue Legacy lists New Game+ as a trope...)

      NG+ is when you start the game again with bonuses specifically after completing the game. That would make it a subtrope.
  • 2 Mar 7th, 2018 at 12:12PM
    Videogame
    Lastest Reply: 7th Mar, 2018 02:11:04 PM
    A common staple of video games (of all levels of realism): the hero is exloring a dungeon, a castle, an ancient Temple of Doom, or some such, and comes across many mechanisms (typically lever-operated) that work reversibly — without any obvious source of power. For example, flip a small lever and a heavy wall panel will slide up revealing a passage; flip the lever again and the panel will slide down; flip the lever again and the panel goes up again, and so on indefinitely. (Obviously an Acceptable Break from Reality, but makes you wonder what's powering all this...) Reply
  • 1 Mar 6th, 2018 at 8:08PM
    Videogame
    Lastest Reply: 6th Mar, 2018 08:48:52 PM
    A level where you have to finish the mission as normal without harming a certain enemy, even if it tries to kill you. Reply
  • 1 Mar 6th, 2018 at 10:10AM
    Videogame
    Lastest Reply: 6th Mar, 2018 01:07:36 PM
    If the Limit Break is presented as a super move that is usable only when a gauge is full, there is this consumable item or spell in RPG games that instantly fill this gauge, giving the player one free chance of executing the Limit Break. Do we have tropes for this kind of spells or items? Reply
  • 3 Mar 6th, 2018 at 4:04AM
    Videogame
    Lastest Reply: 6th Mar, 2018 10:09:19 AM
    Do we have a trope for a customisable or Insert Name Here Player Character being given some sort of epitaph or default name, often to separate them from other customisable characters in the same series, or (in cases where the same character is playable in each game) to give NPCs something to call them in recorded dialogue:

    • Every Persona PC has a canon name, and a title like "Main Character" or "The Protagonist" to distinguish them from the PC of the other games.
    • In Fallout, every game gives the customisable character a distinct title (e.g. "The Vault Dweller" for the first, "The Lone Wanderer" for 3, "The Courier" for New Vegas, etc).
    • The main character of Saints Row is known as "The Boss".
    • The main character of the first three Mass Effect games is known by their surname, Shephard.
    Reply

      Canon Name or Everyone Calls Him "Barkeep"?

      Canon Name is more there being a literal canon answer to Hello, [Insert Name Here] and Everyone Calls Him "Barkeep" is more about a character being known by a job title/role (like Only Known by Their Nickname).

      Both can be invoked by it, but neither quite covers what I was thinking of (basically that a customisable character who has to be treated as a Featureless Protagonist has a set title or name that can be used to otherwise distinguish them when talking about them — it might even be used to subvert Canon Name).

      The description for Hello, [Insert Name Here] treats this as inherent when said trope intersects with voice acting, due to the limits of technology and storytelling. IE, I can only think of one example (Fallout 4) that attempts to defy it by recording almost 1000 common names and nicknames, though the description mentions there being rare attempts at it prior to that.

      Not saying this isn't tropeable, but that its one of those weird tangential tropes that can only exist when X trope is already in play, but it isn't really a subtrope. Sort of like Obscured Special Effects to address the limits of what Special Effects can actually do.
  • 0 Mar 6th, 2018 at 7:07AM
    Videogame
    Do we have a trope that is the opposite of Item Crafting?

    Some video games (particularly RP Gs) allow the players to reduce / dismantle / shatter an item or a weapon in order to obtain materials, or socketed gems... Reply
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/query.php?type=lnf&status=all&sort=activity&f=Videogame