Trivia / Ferris Bueller's Day Off

  • Actor Allusion: Ferris hacks into the school's system from his computer to change the number of absences he's had. That's not the first time Broderick hacked into his school's system. Though Bueller is less enthusiastic about it:
    "I asked for a car, I got a computer. How's that for being born under a bad sign?"
  • Beam Me Up, Scotty!: Ben Stein as the economics professor never says, "Anyone? Anyone? Bueller? Bueller?" He does say these lines but separately. He first says, "Bueller? Bueller?" while taking attendance and then later during his lecture asks, "Anyone? Anyone?"
  • California Doubling: Ferris' house is actually in Long Beach, California and the restaurant they go to is in West Hollywood.
  • Cast Incest: On-screen siblings Matthew Broderick and Jennifer Grey dated and were even engaged for a while after appearing in this film together.
  • Creator Backlash: John Hughes actually disliked the TV adaptation and actually tried to block its release. Unfortunately, however, he was unable to do so, and the best that he could do was to stipulate that NBC and Paramount not use his name to promote the series.
  • Dawson Casting: Averted with Mia Sara, (Sloane) who was 18 (playing a high school junior). Played straight with Matthew Broderick (Ferris) who was 23, Jennifer Grey (Jeannie) who was 25, and Alan Ruck (Cameron) who was 29 when the film was shot during the fall of 1985.
  • Dyeing for Your Art: Charlie Sheen stayed awake for 48 hours before filming his scene so that he would appear tired and strung-out. Now he prefers the quicker method of good, all-natural cocaine.
  • Enforced Method Acting: In the cab, when Ferris tickles Sloan. Actress Mia Sara's laughter was real, because Matthew Broderick and Alan Ruck actually took off her shoe and tickled her foot.
  • Flip-Flop of God: The DVD commentary pegs Ferris as a spoiled jerk. However, Hughes intentionally cut a scene that explicitly makes Ferris a thief, and cast Matthew Broderick in the role because he felt Broderick was the only one who could make Ferris likable. So do we empathize with Ferris or not? Either interpretation of the character is equally valid. And it doesn't help that both interpretations can work concurrently with each other (i.e. Ferris is a jerk and trickster, but he's OUR jerk and trickster).
  • Follow the Leader: After this movie became hugely successful, many teen shows throughout the next decade or so (particularly those aimed at children) implemented a Ferris Bueller-like character (i.e. Zack Morris from Saved by the Bell, Ronnie Pinsky from Salute Your Shorts, Parker Lewis from Parker Lewis Can't Lose, etc.). Some of these were just shallow/one-dimensional caricatures of Ferris; others weren't.
  • Harpo Does Something Funny: Ben Stein originally only had his iconic "Bueller......Bueller" scene, but John Hughes thought he had such distinctive voice that he asked Stein to just talk about any subject he knew a lot about, which led to the short scene of him teaching a class on the Great Depression.
  • I Am Not Spock: For a long time, Matthew Broderick never liked talking about this movie, though it seems he's eased up about it, since he appeared in a 2012 Super Bowl commercial that parodied the film.
  • Old Shame: Charlie Sheen said a few years later that watching his one scene in the movie made him want to punch himself in the mouth.
    • He seems to have made peace with it, reprising his character in his exact scene from the John Hughes tribute episode of The Goldbergs in 2015.
  • Playing Against Type: Most of Matthew Broderick's roles are more milquetoast than Ferris.
  • Real-Life Relative: The actors who played Ferris's parents (Cindy Pickett and Lyman Ward) later got married in real life. Unfortunately, however, they divorced in 1992.
  • Recycled: The Series: Lasted barely a season, mainly because it was heavily changed to the point where it could be considered In-Name-Only. Among other things, the setting was changed from Chicago to L.A., Ferris was now an obnoxious nerd who only believed he was wildly popular (and attended school without complaint!), Cameron was still neurotic but lacked the tragic backstory from the film, thus making him a figure of fun, Sloane was now catty and shallow (the spelling of her name was also changed to Sloan), Ferris's parents were now named Bill and Barbara instead of Tom and Katie, and the list goes on and on. Not even a very young Jennifer Aniston (as Jeannie) could save it. John Hughes actually did not like the series himself, and actually tried to block its release. Unfortunately, he was unable to do so, and the best that he could do was to demand that NBC and Paramount not use his name to promote the series.
  • Star-Making Role: Three years prior, WarGames is what got Broderick noticed. But this movie clearly is what made Broderick a star, and it is arguably his most famous role.
  • Technology Marches On:
    • If mobile phones were as widespread then as they are today, it'd be harder for Ferris to bluff his parents if he could be contacted anytime, anywhere.
    • It would have been a lot harder for Ferris to pretend to be Abe Frohman, the Sausage King of Chicago, since the real Abe Frohman would most likely have a webpage either for himself or for his company today complete with at least one photograph of himself.
    • A video of Ferris dancing on the parade float would have most likely made its way to Youtube today, and the jig would be up.
    • Ferris' line, "I asked for a car. I got a computer. How's that for being born under a bad sign?" seems strange today, because now having your own computer is almost as much as a status symbol for teens as having your own car.
  • Throw It In: "They think he's a righteous dude" was improvised by Edie McClurg, the actress who played Grace.
    • Ben Stein improvised the entire lecture about the Hawley-Smoot Tariff.
    • Rooney's line about leaving "my cheese in the wind" was ad-libbed. John Hughes wanted a comment that was complete nonsense.
  • Unintentional Period Piece: Ferris' leopard pattern vest he wears throughout the film places it firmly in the eighties. '80s Hair and suspenders add to it.
  • What Could Have Been: John Hughes' first choice to play Ferris was Michael J. Fox. Ironically, Broderick was the first choice to play Fox's role of Alex P. Keaton in Family Ties. However, Broderick declined, partially because his father, James Broderick, had become terminally ill, and partially because he did not actually want to commit to a weekly TV series. Even more ironically, James Broderick had co-starred with Fox's Family Ties co-star, Meredith Baxter-Birney, on the ABC drama, Family.
    • Johnny Depp was also considered, as well as Robert Downey, Jr., Jim Carrey, Rob Lowe, Tom Cruise and John Cusack.
    • Mia Sara almost didn't play Sloane because at the same time she auditioned, she was simultaneously auditioning to play Sarah in Labyrinth.
    • Molly Ringwald missed out on Sloane. According to Ringwald, "John wouldn't let me do it: he said that the part wasn't big enough for me".
    • Anthony Michael Hall turned down the role of Cameron, as he didn't want to get typecast. Emilio Estevez also turned it down.
    • Paul Gleason was considered for Ed Rooney. Gleason had previously played the role of an assistant principal in The Breakfast Club.
    • The script contained a scene where Ferris, Sloane, and Cameron go to a strip club. Paramount executives told John Hughes there were only so many shooting days left, so the scene was scrapped.
    • After working together on Weird Science, John Hughes offered Bill Paxton the role of the garage attendant. However, Paxton turned it down because he felt the role was too small. He admits that he regrets turning it down because Hughes never offered him a role again.
    • The movie didn't have a soundtrack album for decades because Hughes himself blocked one back in the 1980s, because he felt the movie's music was too eclectic to make a coherent album. Many were delighted when La-La Land Records released an official album (there have been bootleg releases) in 2016.
  • Word of Dante: A researcher discovered the titular day off was June 5, 1985, based on the Cubs game that Ferris goes to in the movie.
    • The game where scenes from the film were shot was actually played on Sept. 24, 1985.
    • The late school-year date adds some subtext to the proceedings; Ferris was mere weeks, if not days away from graduating.
  • Word of God: John Hughes said in 1999 that several of his "Shermer" movies, including Sixteen Candles, The Breakfast Club, Ferris Bueller's Day Off, and Planes, Trains and Automobiles, are all a part of the same universe. According to Hughes, Samantha Baker knew Ferris.
  • Word of Saint Paul: According to Alan Ruck, the reason Cameron wears a Gordie Howe Detroit Red Wings jersey is because Cameron had a grandfather in Detroit, whom he had a great relationship with, that used to take him to Red Wings games.
  • Write Who You Know: Cameron and Charlie Sheen's character were both based on people John Hughes knew in high school.
    • In addition, Alan Ruck based his phony impression of Sloane's father on legendary stage director Gene Saks, who had previously directed both him and Matthew Broderick in Biloxi Blues.
  • This is former U.S. Vice President Dan Quayle's favorite movie.
  • Three replica 1961 Ferrari 250 GT Spyder California replicas were used in filming.
    • The Hero car was built by Mark Goyette and leased to Paramount for filming. This one was used in almost all exterior shots, and is the one that jumps over the camera. When filming was completed, it was returned to Mark, with the exhaust crushed and the rear body panels cracked. He repaired it and sold it to a young couple in California. The husband ran it off the road, and Mark rebuilt the front end. The couple later sold it in the '90s, and it resurfaced in the early 2000s, but hasn't emerged again since.
    • A kit was sold to Paramount for their stunt car, but they did such a poor job assembling it that it was unusable for anything but falling out the window of Cameron's house at the end. It was later rebuilt and ended up in Planet Hollywood Minneapolis, but fell off the map along with Planet Hollywood Minneapolis.
    • A third kit, meant to be a shell to be dropped out of the window, was bought but never completed. Mark Goyette mentions he heard it was completed and sold off, but it could just as likely be sitting in a backlot at Paramount.

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