troperville

tools

toys


main index

Narrative

Genre

Media

Topical Tropes

Other Categories

TV Tropes Org
random
Match Sequence
Hey kids! Knock your score off Disco Stu's head for a free game!

A Match Sequence is a Pinball game mechanic where, at the end of a game, the last two digits of the players' scores (which will always be a multiple of 10) is compared against a random two-digit number (also a multiple of 10). If a player's digits match the game's, a free game is awarded (indicated with the infamous knocker sound). The match bonus was first introduced in 1957, using the single digit of the scores; score inflation eventually elevated the match to the last two digits.

Not too surprisingly, matches occur fairly infrequently. Older games had the chance of getting the free game set at around 10%, but newer games will either dynamically adjust the frequency of matches, or follow a level set by the operator, from a standard 7% to a paltry 1%.

Back when pinball was a controversial subject, this feature was often banned, as it was considered a form of gambling. While it's probably not that bad, the feature is specifically designed to get more money out of players: it has a disproportionately higher chance of giving a player a match if two have just played, so the other player will deposit money and they will both play again.

Older electro-mechanical pinballs used either light-up digits (for single-digit matches) or score reels (for two digits). The arrival of alphanumeric LEDs and, later, dot-matrix displays allowed match sequences to become more and more elaborate, often animated or otherwise specialized to the game's theme. Less creative machines simply show the number being generated, a practice that has all but fallen out of grace today.


Notable Match Sequences Using Alphanumeric LED Displays:

  • Back to the Future does this rather creatively. It starts with a weatherman reporting a severe thunderstorm headed for Hill Valley, then shows the lightning flying across the digit counters, then finally strikes a number.
  • Taxi shows a taxicab zipping across the display, pulling a pair of spinning boxes behind it. The boxes eventually settle down to form a pair of match digits.
  • In Space Shuttle, a pair of rapidly-changing digits chase each other across the various score displays, eventually settling down inside the "Match" display field.
  • The Simpsons (Data East) brands its Match Sequence as "Homer's Lucky Scratch-N-Match", where several digits are scratched off one by one until two remain.
  • In Black Knight 2000, two lightning bolts strike each other, and the digits roll, and stops at the matching digit. The Choir of Angels sing "YEAH!" if any of the digits match.

Notable Match Sequences Using Dot Matrix Displays:

  • South Park's match sequence is (unsurprisingly) Toilet Humor-based: Terrance and Phillip fart out several numbers (contained within bubbles... somehow), one eventually popping. On tamer settings, they burp the bubbles instead.
  • White Water ends with Bigfoot bowling, with the pins being replaced by digits. When he rolls the ball, he knocks away all but two, which forms the match.
  • Big Buck Hunter Pro has one declared to be the "best pinball match screen ever" - a cow excretes twice, with the player shooting the cow pies to reveal the two digits.
  • The Simpsons Pinball Party has Disco Stu dancing for a few seconds before the disco ball falls on him, breaking in half to reveal the digits.
  • Attack from Mars has several numbers flashing until a Martian ship comes and shoots it with a laser, stopping it on the match.
  • Star Wars pinballs:
  • Doctor Who has a piston in the TARDIS repeatedly push up a number, eventually settling on one; afterwards, the background dissipates.
  • Super Mario Bros. simply has the two digits come together.
  • Terminator pinballs:
  • In Medieval Madness, a pair of numbers quickly flash by, then an arrow is fired from off-screen, skewering a roasted marshmallow and stopping the numbers.
  • Later software revisions of No Fear: Dangerous Sports implement the "dice roll" match feature, in additional to the standard match sequence.
  • In The Addams Family, Thing drags a wagon carrying a bag of numbers, and when the wagon hits a bump, two numbers fall off the wagon and form the match.
  • In The Twilight Zone, one of the Invaders fires its laser gun to reveal the two numbers, and any non-matching scores instantly vaporize.
  • Jurassic Park pinballs:
  • Black Rose pulls an interesting twist on this: your score's last two digits will appear... but there are three numbers in all, and they appear on bombs which ignite as soon as all three are shown. One of the fuses is a fake: the other two aren't.
  • Monopoly has Uncle Pennybags slamming his fist on the table, causing two nearby dice to pop up and display the number.
  • Pinball Magic does a "woman sawed in half" trick . When the halves separated they reveal the number.
  • No Good Gofers has Buzz kicking the golf ball down a field where it lands on a yard stick. Interestingly the ball has an odd habit of suddenly rolling away from the intended number.
  • Scared Stiff has Elvira flipping through TV channels displaying different numbers (which also doubles as a shout out as the phrases heard are from previous Williams pinball games). After three clicks, if none of the numbers match, she says "Oh, poo" and turns off the TV.
  • Theatre of Magic has the magician produce two doves from her hands, which fly together and produce the number.
  • Breakshot has a cue ball that bounces off the table, hits a glass, and knocks a lemon that lands between the brunette's breasts to reveal the match number.
  • World Cup Soccer has Striker lighting a rocket, which spirals off and explodes, revealing the number.
  • Star Trek: The Next Generation has a surprisingly generic one: the number is chosen on a space background.
  • TRON: Legacy has a lightcycle drive towards the camera, ending with a flash of light and the number being revealed.
  • Indiana Jones: The Pinball Adventure has Indy walking by several boxes, pushing a cart with more boxes on it, with one of them opening to reveal the number.
  • In The Shadow, a flashlight shines on a brick wall, with a match number in the center. As it sweeps left and right, the number changes, and The Shadow appears and laughs if a match occurs.
  • The Avengers (Stern) has the Hulk (offscreen) smash the number into some sort of surface.
  • The Family Guy sequence has Brian the dog eating from the garbage bin, then blowing a bubble gum bubble from his butt, which pops to reveal the number.
  • Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles has three regular turtles enter the screen, flipping their shells to reveal a number, changing several times before one eventually reveals the final number.
  • Harley Davidson Third Edition has the match number being tattooed on the back of a woman.
  • The Wizard of Oz doesn't use the "multiple of 10" number.
  • In Cirqus Voltaire, a clown walks across the display and gets knocked down by a pie, with the splatter forming the match digits.
  • Big Bang Bar has a drunk martian barfing up the match number.
  • In Monster Bash, Dracula plays a guitar riff while it's plugged into a shaking speaker, which eventually explodes to reveal the match number.
  • In The Champion Pub, the Kid punches the small bag several times, two changing digits behind it, before knocking it down and revealing the final number.
  • Iron Man (Stern) shows Tony Stark landing (and crashing) into his garage, then getting sprayed by one of his household robots. The match number appears in the firefighting foam.
  • NASCAR has a car racing past a sign, which spins to reveal the match number.
  • In Fish Tales, a fish is dropped onto a scale, with the weight as the match.
  • Gilligan's Island has the Skipper think of a match number, which appears inside a Thought Bubble.
  • In Avatar, a clip of Eywa seeds surrounding Jake is shown, with the match number superimposed on it.
  • For Indianapolis 500, assorted Indy cars past and present flash on the display, each sporting a different number. The final car's number forms the match.
  • In Corvette, a mechanic examines a car engine, using a magnifying glass to read the serial numbers. The final magnified digits form the match number.
    Mechanic: "Hey, wait a minute these numbers don't match!"
  • The Party Zone shows Captain B. Zarr flying through space in his rocket, and the exhaust smoke forms the match number.
  • AC/DC has video of Angus Young playing on-stage, during his infamous "mooning the audience" antic. He has his hand up to his ear, listening for the audience's cheers, then turns around and drops his shorts, mooning them. The numbers are on his butt.
  • On Metallica, the Snake gets an unpleasant expression, then vomits on the display, leaving the Match Number behind.
  • In Demolition Man, four monitors rotate, with possible numbers shown on each display, and the monitor with the matching number stops rotating.
  • Stern Pinball's Mustang has a car driving donuts around an open field, and writes out a multiple of 10 as skid marks.
  • In Star Trek (Stern), a Gorn steps into a turbolift, the doors close, then open again to reveal the match number.
  • The Adventures Of Rocky And Bullwinkle And Friends features Aesop chiseling the word "Match" on a wall. His Son then enters from stage left with a jackhammer to carve the match number.
  • In Baywatch, the camera pans down a line of female lifeguards, each holding a card with a two-digit number. The last woman's number is the match number. An operator configuration even enables jiggling breasts.

Notable Match Sequences Using Color Displays:

  • In Jersey Jack Pinball's The Wizard of Oz, the tornado throws debris around, one of which is a (single!) match digit that hits the screen. If it's a match, the screen shatters.

Other Notable Match Sequences:

  • The 8-bit version of Sonic Spinball uses a very simple match animation.

Fictional Video GamePinball TropesPersonal Arcade
Licensed GameImageSource/OtherMillionaire Playboy

random
TV Tropes by TV Tropes Foundation, LLC is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available from thestaff@tvtropes.org.
Privacy Policy
24520
43