Quotes: They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character

"You've dashed my hopes yet again."
The Nostalgia Critic, in reaction to the easy defeat of a cool-looking white-faced ninja in 3 Ninjas.

"A decentralised organisation engaged in seemingly random acts of violence and brutality, driven by a clearly religious faith in something beyond the perception of “outsiders”? A Star Trek villain that has moved beyond the “nation state” concept of “Star Empires” or “Unions” or “Central Commands”? And they happen to have a name that ties into the defining geopolitical conflict of our time? How do you mess that up?"

For proof of concept, just imagine an alternate version of the story in which the Ganger Doctor and the regular Doctor, despite both being good guys, fall on opposite sides because the Ganger Doctor is slightly more disturbed and moved by the agony of the Gangers and thus ends up in actual conflict. You’d have had a story that actually interrogates the underlying bias that says that oppressed populations should attempt assimilation and politely ask their oppressors to maybe stop killing them so much — one where the moral center of the show is actually split. But instead we get both versions of the Doctor acting in perfect and tedious unity.
Dr. Phil Sandifer on Doctor Who, The Almost People

Every time I watch a show, I get hooked on one particular character who isn't a main character. He or she only gets about one or two scenes per episode, and I watch while slowly and unconsciously ripping a hole out of the sofa pillow with my teeth, because it seems like only I can see the potential in this person that ISN'T being exploited!

You know that quirky side character that’s really interesting and entertaining but ultimately overshadowed by the boring lead that’s got no real personality or motives? Digger’s like a comic that’s all about that quirky side character.
— Commenter Paint here about Digger

He was misguided in his quest, sure, but we can all understand the unbelievable pain he must have felt and his desire for vengeance. On top of that, he didn't make any grand speeches or act like he was the star of Shakespeare in Space. He was just a regular guy (piloting a space necromancer's flying tomb) who had everything taken from him and desperately needed someone to blame, making this face-tattooed, time-traveling alien one of the most relatable (and interesting) characters in all of Star Trek. In comparison, Kirk's main motivation throughout the series is that ... he really wants to be a spaceship captain?