No Export For You / Other

  • For odd reasons the BBQ variant of Pringles were left out, when the new XXL's were released in Denmark. This may have been caused by Denmark's own chips KiMs Chips.
  • For people of the UK, various American food brands. Corn dogs, Taco Bell, Dairy Queen, Wendy's, Arby's, Denny's. They eventually got Subway, which was... "a moderate" success...
    • Canada too, to a lesser extent. One fun road trip game to play when crossing the Can-US border is to list all the chain-stores/brands not available in Canada as you pass them. There are people who do thriving business smuggling "classic" Americana like Cherry Coke across the border for homesick expats and Canadians with acquired tastes.
    • Taco Bell has made its way over to the UK. They did try to break into the UK market previously in the early 90s, with a few branches around Greater London, but it proved too unpopular to be profitable. According to That Other Wiki there are five in UK, and one is on an air-force base. Same goes for Wendy's, which was scattered around London in the 1980s.
    • Taco Bell was famously only available in Japan on US military bases, which are off-limits to Japanese civilians. Hency why it was a big deal when one opened up in Shibuya in 2015.
    • Kellogg's used to distribute Brown Sugar Cinnamon Pop-Tarts in Canada but stopped many years ago, citing poor sales.
    • White Castle was once available in Malaysia back in the early 90s. Now they're but a distant memory to those who still remember them. Taco Bell, however, is a far more straightforward example of No Export For You- they've never attempted to enter the Malaysian market at all, and the closest restaurant is in Singapore.
    • Popeye's in Malaysia has succumbed to the same fate as White Castle two decades before. Apparently the franchise wasn't making money anymore once the novelty had worn off, since they weren't introducing new food to the menu every now and then (Malaysians are a strange bunch who like the food on the menu of a restaurant to change every few months- apparently to compensate for the lack of actual seasons in the country). The franchiser has converted all the branches to Texas Chicken restaurants (that's Church's Chicken for those of you stateside).
    • Adding Wendy's to the list of fast food restaurants that have left Malaysia. This one stands out because it came in the late 80s, but left when the 90s rolled around. Then it came back in the early 2000s, but now it has left again.
    • You can even get this within the same country. Bojangle's doesn't exist outside a few southeastern states.
    • In-N-Out is a notable example as it's one of the most highly favored fast food restaurants in the country, even though they've never branched out any further from the southwest.
    • The same goes with Muebles Troncoso, a famous Mexican furniture store located in Mexico City and the city of Pachuca, thanks to a famous, long-runner variety/children's show named En Familia Con Chabelo (which ran from 1968 to 2015), since they're their main sponsors. Despise being well-known in all Mexico thanks of four decades of uninterrupted sponsorship, they haven't opened any store outside Mexico City or Pachuca. This also become a source of endless jokes for many Mexicans about how Muebles Troncoso are now filthy rich thanks to that program, but they haven't opened any store outside the capital.
    • According to the Irish who visited the United States, the Irish LOVE Mountain Dew. Unfortunately for them and the rest of Europe, it's not manufactured there.
      • Oddly enough it's possible to buy Dr. Pepper and Mountain Dew from Germany. It makes sense though since a large majority of danes prefer to buy cheap food and soda, and the Border Malls (Malls that literally cover a whole town and are near the border between Denmark and Germany) got mostly everything that didn't get an export to Denmark, Sweden, and the likes.
      • Though they eventually got an Energy Drink version released in the UK (presumably the ROI can obtain it too) which apparently only vaguely tastes like the American version.
    • Conversely, their American Cousins have never been able to experience (if that is the correct word) UK grown fast food companies like Wimpy, Spud-U-Like and Nando's.
      • Despite American outlets only existing in the Washington area, Nando's is quite well-known to American One Direction fans because it is Niall's favorite restaurant.
    • Likewise, Americans who don't live close to the Canadian border have been denied New York Fries, Pizza Pizza/Pizza 73 (due to Little Caesars' longtime slogan), Harvey's, Swiss Chalet, and Mr. Sub. (For reasons unknown, Boston Pizza trades as Boston's The Gourmet Pizza in the US.)
  • Hong Kong used to have Domino's, which has been replaced by Pizza Box. No comparison.
  • Importation of firearms, at least in places where they aren't banned outright, often comes under heavy and somewhat contradictory restrictions. In particular, the importation of pistols into the United States is done on a "points" system that rewards points for things like target sights or all-steel composition, and deducts them for things like small size or caliber. In particular, the .380 caliber Glock 25 cannot be imported into the US (the other Glocks are imported with fragile target sights, which are removed and replaced with the stock sights by the importer), and the Walther PPK has a specific US-only model called the PPK/S, which gains enough points for importation by using a larger Walther PP frame.
  • Iran has blocked access to any Google service other than Web Search and Gmail. Given the fact that they might copy a nuclear warhead kernel from Google Codes or use Chrome for their devilish affairs, or worse, use Google Earth to choose a nuclear bomb test field, it's a logical thing to do.
    • An electronic age update on embargoes? No new 24 episodes for you!
      • Even though it is devilishly easy to get around this ban using Tor or disconnect.me.
  • The Kinder Surprise Eggs are famous for being banned in the United States, due to a law from the late 1930's that forbid non nutritional content in foods. Slightly averted recently in March 2013 with the release of a similar product called Choco Treasure Eggs, which are made in the USA and has a different design to avoid the similar fate. Unless Kinder Surprise Eggs adapt Choco Treasure's design, the Kinder Surprise Eggs themselves will still be a NEFY in the US.
  • Most people in the US and in the UK think of Slayers as purely an anime franchise with some manga here and there; only so many recall that it actually began as a series of light novels. Fifteen novels surrounding the main story exist, along with over thirty prequel novels (chronicling the adventures of Lina and Naga) and even a Crossover story. Indeed, Tokyo Pop only licensed the first eight novels of the main series (in which the first two seasons of the anime are based off of), and they are very hard to come by.
    • Also, only one manga adaptation of the series was officially translated.
  • The three-volume diaries of Higuchi Ichiyo. This is especially maddening since many commentaries on her work note that the diaries were better than most of her fiction!
  • Some wholesalers and distributors from the US ban international shipping, mostly due to the African shipping scams that have surfaced.
  • Oreos are unavailable in Hungary (except in specialty import stores), due to the success of the local Oreo clone called Pilóta. It doesn't help that nowadays both Oreo and Pilóta are made by Kraft.
    • Oreos are also absent in Egypt, where the local baked-confectionery giant BiscoMisr produces the universally-beloved Borio. We're not joking.
  • Dippin Dots are a popular form of ice cream that's sold in North America as well as in many Asian countries (such as Japan, Philippines, Taiwan, etc.) and Australia, but not Europe.
  • Automobiles are a frequent victim of this trope. In the United Kingdom, they don't get 4-cylinder Jaguar models, or the new 2013 Mitsubishi Lancer, and the Chrysler 200 sedan. Even worse... looks like the UK doesn't get the new Ford Focus sedan, or the naturally-aspirated 1.6 petrol models, or even the Toyota Camry. Proof that Britain still gets let down with major international models. This may be due to the fact that the Americans Hate Tingle trope is in play, in which British people hate compact sedans like the Focus sedan in favor of hatchbacks and wagons.
    • The R32, R33 and R34 Nissan Skyline GT-R, which was exclusively released in Japan. However, when Nissan started development of the R35 Nissan GT-R (separating the Skyline and GT-R into two different models), it was developed with the intent of selling it not only in Japan, but in the rest of the world as well.
      • Due to the surge in the Skyline's popularity among American car enthusiasts following the release of Gran Turismo and The Fast and the Furious, a number of Skylines were illegally imported to the United States. A company called Motorex also managed to certify the R33 Skyline for American road use, but after legally importing just a few of them, Motorex's operations ceased due to legal issues.
      • Due to an exemption allowing vehicles over 25 years of age to be registered for road use in the United States (despite not having been certified originally), The R32 Skyline became legal to import starting in 2014.
      • The R34 Skyline GT-R was officially sold by Nissan in the UK market, albeit in limited numbers. Pre-owned R32, R33 and R34 Skylines were also imported in fairly large numbers through gray market channels in the UK, as well as other countries Australia and New Zealand.
    • Speaking about cars made in Japan, the Lexus ES is an inversion. Because the ES (sold in Japan as the Toyota Windom) was a sales flop in its home market, Toyota (Lexus' parent) decided to discontinue Japanese sales of the Windom and focus on exports, even though the Lexus ES was built in Japan. The result is a strange case where a Japanese-made car was produced solely for export. Similar cases occurred with the Mazda CX-9 and Subaru BRAT, which were also built in Japan for export only.
    • Malaysia is another country where automobiles are cases of this, partially due to an unfair import law that enforces a 300% import duty on imported vehicles, put up by the government to protect local automobile manufacturers such as Perodua and Proton. note 
    • The Land Rover Defender left the U.S. market in the late 80s, leading to so much pent-up demand that it is far and away the most popular black market vehicle in the country. Typically, recent models are purchased in places like the UK where they're common, with their VIN and other identifiers illegally altered to appear as if they were 1980's models for the US market. Sales prices are typically 10 to 12 times the original purchase price.
    • Audi's RS models, the top-of-the-line versions of most of their cars, are typically not offered to United States customers, despite their lower-end versions being available in the US. America does not receive the RS 3 hot hatchback, the RS 5 coupe, and the RS 6 and RS 7 sedans, and was only briefly offered the RS 4 in the mid-2000's. An oft-cited reason for this is due to the differences in crash standards used by the United States' NHTSA and those used in the rest of the world, and the sales figures that a hypothetical US-market version of the RS cars would be able to generate (compared to their lower end versions) not being high enough to justify the added expense of certifying the RS cars for American road use.
  • The US Air Force's F-22. It's illegal to export, though Japan and Australia have asked about buying them.
  • Irn-Bru is widely available in the UK (it's the best-selling soft drink in Scotland, and the 3rd-best selling in the UK), but it's far more difficult to get hold of in other countries, partially due to having to comply to regulations; the Australian, Canadian and American versions all needed some sort of alterations to conform to health standards, be it the ingredients or the packaging.
  • Good luck finding Starbucks in Italy: it simply doesn't exist. The reason? According to its president, "Italians don't like plastic cups or the idea of drinking coffee while walking around". He doesn't seem to know that lots of Italians would actually love that.
  • Fulfilling criteria #3 (a genre with demand), pornography is frequently subject to "no export for you" — sometimes even between different areas of the US — due to wildly varying obscenity laws. Although the Internet has rendered many such restrictions obsolete, as recently as a decade ago it was common for pornographic materials to be restricted to their country of origin, or if distributed subject to editing, censorship or "international" (re: often bowdlerized) versions. Still occurs today, even with mainstream films. For example, the French film "Q" contained unsimulated sex scenes; the US DVD version, titled "Desires" edits all this footage out.
  • Australia's strict quarantine laws does this to a lot of food products.
  • Cheeses made from raw milk in the U.S. and Australia.
  • In terms of firearms, the Japanese Howa Type 64 and Type 89 rifles are illegal to own and export due to Japan's Anti-Hardware Exporting laws.
  • Blu-ray recorders (as in, a device like a VCR, except it uses recordable Blu-ray media and records in HD!) are at the moment only found in Japan, the UK, and countries with strict anti-monopoly laws like Australia, Hong Kong and New Zealand. This is probably caused by the devices' price range (Blu-ray writers still aren't cheap), and because Digital Piracy Is Evil (Japanese over-the-air television does have DRM). But the more likely reason is because recorders using removable media have fallen out of favor due to the mass adoption of digital video recorders with hard drives (which are more convenient, and can easily handle HD video), as well as streaming services.
  • Hershey's has blocked the sale of British Cadbury's chocolate in the U.S. It has a deal to manufacture Cadbury's chocolate across The Pond with its own recipe, which is unanimously regarded as inferior to the British version.
    • Ditto with Kit Kat in the United States under the Hershey license rather than Nestlé. Although, you can still find Japanese import flavors in Asian grocery stores. Rolo is also licensed by Hershey, so the British version can't be sold stateside either.
    • Nestlé Yorkie bars can't be sold in the U.S. because of Hershey's York peppermint patties and Toffee Crisp can't be sold in America due to having a trade dress too similar to the Reese's brand. The British Smarties are blocked by an American tablet candy with the same name.
    • All these candies can still be mail-ordered from Britain to the U.S. through various online sellers.
    • Eventually averted with Malteasers, as Hershey at one point owned the U.S. trademark for "Malteaser", a similar product. Mars sued Hershey in court, leading to a settlement where Hershey's trademark was withdrawn and Mars started directly importing the product for sale at movie theaters and allowing specialty shop sales.
  • Windows 10's Cortana is only available in some countries (at the moment). The most egregious case is Latin America and Mexico, since Cortana is only available in Spain, but not Mexico and Latin America, possibly because Spain is possibly considered by Microsoft as a legitimate market and also because European Spanish is the defacto dialect used in software and games.note  This has pissed off more than a few Brazilians, and a large number of Asians as well. It is also getting flak because Microsoft is launching Cortana in India of all places instead of more developed countries whose citizens have actual use for Cortana and will more likely use the feature more frequently.
  • On the topic of Windows 10, Microsoft is closing the Music and Movies store in a lot of countries after just opening it for these countries for three months with Windows 10's launch. Saying that the affected people aren't pleased is an understatement, especially since it feels like Microsoft tricked them into upgrading (the stores were not accessible in Windows 8.1, but were made available only on Windows 10 on it's launch, only to be closed again three months later).
  • Importation of meat and dairy products in most countries became subject to this after the outbreaks of BSE and foot-and-mouth disease in Europe in the '90s and early '00s.
  • StarCraft potato chips are exclusive to Korea.
  • If you want things like Dr. Pepper or Mountain Dew in China, look around import shops in Beijing, Shanghai, or Shenzhen and hope you get lucky. For 8 yuan a can.
  • Similarly, lemon sodas from Asia, like Schweppe's C+ in China and Hong Kong or CC Lemon in Japan, are devilishly hard to get in America.
  • Senran Kagura based ice cream, gelato, and soft drink cups were only available in Japan for ten days at Akihabara's Cafe Euro.
  • The Suntory Final Fantasy VII potion, Final Fantasy XII potion, Dissidia: Final Fantasy potion, and Final Fantasy XIII elixir drinks were not made available outside Japan.
  • A number of Final Fantasy promotions were only in Japan, including Final Fantasy themed soda, Cup Noodles, and... perfume.
  • Averted with Japanese foods and snacks that can be found at import stores, like those choco-balls that come with Gundam models or Super Mario Bros. rice topping packets and many more.
  • Blackcurrants are considered a staple fruit flavor in Europe, especially the UK, right alongside other staples like strawberry, grape, orange, lemon, cherry, and the like. If you are an American, whether North or South, chances are you've never eaten anything blackcurrant-flavored. This is because everything blackcurrant-related, including the plants themselves, face restrictions or bans from entering the Americas due to their potential as a disease vector for white pine blister rust, which caused epidemics in the early 20th century and scared Americans of the time enough to never bring blackcurrants over again. Recently, however, processed blackcurrant products, like drinks and jam, have made their way over in limited quantities, and a breeding program in Vancouver is dedicated to producing a strain that won't spread the disease and has acceptable-quality fruit. Hence, presently, blackcurrants are on their way up to Bad Export for You, with the breeders hoping to get above that. The blackcurrant flavor of Skittles is even renamed to grape in the US, despite the actual flavor not being changed at all.
  • The Nokia N9 is the semi-successor of the famous geek toy N900 and runs the next version of the GNU/Linux distribution Maemo. Its development had just been completed when Stephen Elop became Nokia's new CEO. Being a Steve Ballmer-era Microsoft puppet and about to switch Nokia's entire smartphone portfolio to Windows, he just had to prevent the release of a phone booting the arch-enemy OS. He was convinced in the end that the N9 cost a lot of money to develop that Nokia shouldn't write off as a total loss. So he did allow the N9 to be sold, but only on a few select small markets like Finland itself, the Netherlands or Switzerland, so that this Linux phone wouldn't see any widespread success.
    • Subverted by the German retailers Cyberport and Saturn/Media Markt who imported large quantities of N9s from the Netherlands to sell them in Germany. They must have seen some potential in that phone, maybe because it was geek bait (up to 64GB of Flash memory meet a Debian fork), maybe because the 16GB version was available in three colors not offered by any other manufacturer.
  • Arms sales are big business, but subject to restriction by the military and government of the country a given weapons manufacturer is based in. There are lots of examples, which are generally in one of two categories; either the weapon/weapons platform is allowed to be sold with modifications (less effective electronic warfare systems, etc), or there is a complete ban on foreign sales (such as the F-22 and B-52 being US only aircraft).

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/NoExportForYou/Other