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The Great Flood
"And the flood was forty days upon the earth; and the waters increased, and bare up the ark, and it was lift up above the earth. And the waters prevailed, and were increased greatly upon the earth; and the ark went upon the face of the waters. And the waters prevailed exceedingly upon the earth; and all the high hills, that were under the whole heaven, were covered. Fifteen cubits upward did the waters prevail; and the mountains were covered."
Genesis 7:17-20, The Bible (King James Version)

What happens when God (or the gods) decides to Kill It with Water. All of it.

Older than the book itself, this is the one element nearly ubiquitous in mythology, and with good reason: it may have had a basis in reality note , but as a kind of cultural memory it forms the backbone of many origin mythologies, from the Australian Aboriginal Dreamtime to the biblical Book of Genesis. Usually the moral of the story is "don't piss off the gods," but sometimes the flooding is part of the process of (re)creating a world.

Some scientists argue that the prevalence of the Great Flood in Eastern Mediterranean myth derives from a historical event, in which the Black Sea was suddenly flooded in about 5600 BCE. However this would only account for the Middle Eastern and possibly the European myths, not the ones from the rest of the world. Some of various religious persuasions believe that the prevalence of the Great Flood myth derives from an actual worldwide great flood caused by their deity of choice (although a global flood isn't seen as plausible by most scientists)

Examples:

Anime and Manga
  • Saint Seiya: the god Poseidon, wishing to wash away the filth of mankind, raises the oceans to destroy all of civilization. In the anime, this is compounded by the priestess Hilda praying to Odin to preserve the ice in the Grim Up North eternally frozen; her absence causes it to melt and contribute to the flooding.
  • Dragon Knights: the demon fish Varawoo sunk the world before it was sealed away.
  • Now and Then, Here and There : Don't piss off Lala Ru.

Film
  • This was the end result in 2012. The earthquakes and volcanic eruptions were merely a prelude.
  • The "Rite of Spring" segment of Fantasia actually ends with the entire Earth being flooded by a massive tidal wave caused by a solar eclipse.
    • Retold in Fantasia 2000 in the re-imagined "Noah's Ark" adaptation of Pomp and Circumstance.
  • In Atlantis: The Lost Empire the Biblical flood was caused by the Atlantis' weapons research and the city was sunk to save it from destruction.
  • This happens in Noah, starring Russell Crowe.

Literature
  • Raptor Red: A flood of the sort that only comes every thousand years strikes Raptor Red and her family around the middle of the story.
  • In Shane Johnson's Ice an astronaut ends up traveling back in time where he experiences the biblical flood.
  • Flood is a hard sci-fi depiction of a global flood in modern times.
  • One of the two founding myths of Ankh-Morpork involves a boat that was built to withstand a great flood, containing two of every animal. The accumulated waste products of all the animals was tipped over the side, and they called it Ankh-Morpork.
    • In Carpe Jugulum, one of the things that worries the Slightly Reverend Mightily Oats about Omnian dogma is that every Discly culture has a flood myth, similar but different to the one in the Book of Om.
  • According to Word of God, the past of the Septimus Heap universe featured one, causing Syren Island to sink beneath the sea.
  • Referenced in Orson Scott Card's Past Watch: The Redemption of Christopher Columbus, in which the origin of the Myth was tracked back to the flooding of the Red Sea.
  • Kine, by AR Lloyd, plays with this. The flood in question is a perfectly ordinary localised inundation of low-lying flat land by heavy rainfall, but it is presented as a seemingly global event from the point of view of the protagonists - who are weasels, whose point of view is only half an inch above the water, so it makes sense.

Live-Action TV
  • Gaius Baltar mentions the story of the Flood as explained in the Book of Phytia to Roslin, comparing his role in the destruction of the Colonies to that of the Flood. While no actual Flood is seen, the story is clearly a reference to the biblical story and may even have been its origin.

Mythology and Religion
  • The Bible, obviously. Noah lives.
    • Averted in the Qu'ran, in which the flood is merely local and destroys only one civilization.
  • The Epic of Gilgamesh: The earliest recorded example.
  • Gnosticism subverts this trope, as it does so many. Noah constructed the ark according to the instruction of the malevolent Demiurge, but it was burned down with magical fire by Eve's daughter Norea in a fit of supernatural rage. He built a second ark, which turned out to be useless because they were just transferred temporarily into Heaven for the length of the flood.
  • Various Native American Mythologies
    • The Aztecs believed that the Earth had been created and destroyed four times before the present age, and the end of the last age was a watery one.
  • Various Asia-Pacific and Polynesian Mythologies
  • Classical Mythology has three, most notably Deucalion's.
  • This list could go on forever. Just check Wikipedia [1].
  • According to Plato, Atlantis was destroyed by earthquakes and floods.
  • Norse Mythology. Ýmir is killed and his blood flooded the earth and drowned all but two of the frost giants.
    • Eventually after Ragnarök the world will sink.
  • Hindu Mythology: The earth sank into the sea for some reason and Vishnu, as the Boar Avatar, went down and brought it back to the surface.
  • Chinese Mythology, but instead of the flood wiping out humanity, Emperor Yu directed the construction of great canals and redirected rivers to control the flood and provide better irrigation for farming (after the previous Emperor failed to control the flood by building dams). Instead of being a story about the sin of man, the Chinese flood myth is a very Taoist parable about cooperating with nature instead of futilely fighting against it.

Video Games
  • Perfect Chaos from Sonic Adventure.
  • One of these apparently happened sometime between Mega Man ZX and Legends.
  • The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker takes place in a world where the Flood waters have yet to recede. Everybody lives on mountaintops.
  • In Final Fantasy III, destroying the balance between Light and Darkness plunges the world into the latter, freezing the surface in time and then flooding it so only a temple and a priestess remain above water.
  • The goal of Team Aqua in Pokémon Sapphire and Emerald.
  • Killing Poseidon unleashes a great flood in God of War 3. And he's merely the first God to die in that game.
  • Konami's Noahs Ark actually takes place during the flood where the water slowly raises during gameplay.
  • Fire Emblem: Radiant Dawn explains that before years began to be counted, Ashunera expressed great grief over the warring of the Beorc and Laguz, and caused the entire world to be flooded due to her grief overlapping with her power unintentionally. She then split into Ashera and Yune, causing a war of dominance to take place.
  • In Afterlife, this can randomly befall the planet you're supposed to be taking care of, killing off the entire population "except for a few smarty-pants who figured out how to build a boat."

Western Animation
  • Gargamel ends up creating such a flood that covers the entire Smurf Forest by using magic beans in The Smurfs episode "Blue Eyes Returns". It took Smurfette and her pegasus friend Blue Eyes to fix the problem and restore the forest to normal.
  • Rugrats: in the episode Two by two, Grandpa Boris tells the babies the story of Noah's Ark. They naturally re-enact their own ship and collect small critters in their backyard before it starts to rain (which they're believed to be a flood like in Noah's Ark). They question why Noah originally collected two of each animal, but quickly deduced it's for having a friend along for the ride. Not that babies in a G-rated show would get the real reason though.

Real Life
  • The Boxing Day Tsunami.
  • The 2011 Australia floods.
  • A number of record-breaking floods throughout recorded history could be considered as these, at least in terms of regional and economic effects.
    • Rising waters due to global warming and the end of the Ice Age. Could have been The Flood. note 
  • There has been some evidence found of a massive flooding when the Black Sea originally formed, which possibly inspired the writings on such great Floods in the Bible and the Epic of Gilgamesh in the first place.

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alternative title(s): Great Flood
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