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Angels Pose
The originators of this very trope.

When a team, generally young women, pose in a distinctive style in the midst of battle. It looks pretty good on camera and it conveys teamwork. The general appearance is usually dependent on a symmetrical three person shape, the two on the outside have their body positions turned away from the center person. A silhouette is optional. But there is also a two-person variation of them standing back to back. Often done in a montage.

No actual firearms are (usually) involved though.

Originated by the famous poses of Charlie's Angels

It is often used as a Stock Parody. Compare the "Super Sentai" Stance and Back-to-Back Badasses.


Examples

    open/close all folders 

    Anime & Manga 

    Films — Live-Action 

    Live-Action TV 
  • On Whose Line Is It Anyway?, this happens during any game of Film, TV, and Theater Styles where Charlie's Angels is one of the styles. Done unintentionally when Robin Williams was on as a guest.
  • It was done in at least one episode of That '70s Show which of course actually had Tanya Roberts who was one of the Angels on it.
  • The title sequence for Funky Squad, an Affectionate Parody of 70's cop shows.
  • In the Flight of the Conchords second-season episode "Prime Minister", the Prime Minister of New Zealand wants a photo like this. With a Barack Obama impersonator (who he thought was actually Obama).
  • The late '70s The Hardy Boys Nancy Drew Mysteries TV show's third season opening featured a silhouette of Frank & Joe Hardy in action.
  • MAT in the opening credits to Return of Ultraman, which predates Charlie's Angels.
  • The Big Bang Theory: In "The Bakersfield Expedition", the guys are dressed up as characters from Star Trek: The Next Generation and organize a photo shoot. One of the photo is in this stock pose, which was invoked by Raj's calling Charlie's Angels.
  • The presenters of Top Gear in the Title Sequence for The Intercepters, a non-existent Seventies action show.
  • The three female stars of Agentsof SHIELD strike the pose (while saying "Yes, Charlie!") during the show's Season 1 gag reel.

    Music 
  • Destiny's Child did this a lot when performing their smash hit "Independent Woman (Part I)". Makes sense, considering that it was the theme song for the Charlie's Angels film reboot in 2000.

    New Media 
  • Most any picture on the internet featuring multiple (non-model) girls with guns. Though, these usually feature all the chicks in the picture brandishing some sort of firearm.
  • Or, for that matter, just about any picture of two or three women under the age of thirty on any social network; guns are generally faked with their hands.

    Tabletop Games 

    Video Games 

    Web Comics 

    Western Animation 
  • Done in X-Men: Evolution in the Bayville Sirens episode, though it's hard to catch as it only appears on a television screen for a few moments.
  • The title logo of Codename: Kids Next Door, a clear parody of the Charlie's Angels one. Its intro animation actually shows them jumping into the logo one by one. This logo was then parodied in the book Fat Camp Commandos.
  • Done at one point in the original opening theme of Totally Spies!
  • An episode of Daria paying homage to detective shows from the '70s has Quinn, Sandi, and Stacy posing as the Angels.
  • The animated kids' show Mickey Mouse Clubhouse does this for a brief moment in a spy-themed episode with Minnie, Daisy, and uh... Mickey.
  • Parodied by The Ember Island Players in Avatar: The Last Airbender, as an homage to the fan term Ozai's Angels.
  • Dexter's Laboratory gave us G.I.R.L. Squad, with an opening montage ending in one of these.
  • Space Ghost Coast to Coast used the pose in their episode parodying detective series of the 1970s. Animator C. Martin Croker said he drew Zorak's silhouette to look as though he was explaining directions to someone rather than preparing a karate chop.
  • The opening title sequence of Beavis and Butt-Head Do America parodies this and every other 70's cop show. Butt-Head states in an interview that it's because the '70s are the last time Mike Judge got laid.
  • The 90's chapters of Secret Squirrel used it on the opening credits of one episode.
  • In the Phineas and Ferb episode "Phineas and Ferb-Busters!", Candace does this with her friends Jenny and Stacy after putting them through a Training Montage.


American Gothic CoupleStock PosesAngry Fist-Shake
You Talkin' to Me?Shout-Outs IndexBlood Bath
American Gothic CoupleStock ParodiesThe Bard on Board
Charlie's AngelsImageSource/Live-Action TVPower Trio

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