Film: The Man Who Knew Too Little

Wallace: Was that a tear? ...How do you people do it? Did you... poke yourself in the eye? Or are you thinking right now: "My dog is dead"?
Lori: What's the matter with you? Are you enjoying this?
Wallace: Enormously. "My dog is dead." [pokes himself in the eye] "My dog is dead."

A 1997 film written by Robert Farrar (adapted from his novel Watch That Man) and starring Bill Murray, which combines And You Thought It Was a Game with Mistaken for Badass.

Wallace Ritchie is an American vacationing in London, hoping to spend his birthday with his brother Jimmy (Peter Gallagher). Unfortunately, James has an important business dinner; in order to get rid of Wallace for the evening, he signs him up for an evening with the Theatre of Life, an experimental hyper-realistic audience-participation theater.

Wallace receives information, via a phone call, about the character he should play; unknown to him, the calls get mixed up, and he instead receives instructions intended for a real hit-man. Hilarity Ensues.

Wallace proceeds to ham his way through the underworld of secret agents and espionage. He almost immediately decides to break from "the script" and help the person he was ordered to kill: Lori (Joanne Whalley), a call-girl with a heart of gold who's trying to blackmail the Defence Minister she's been sleeping with. Along the way, Wally accidentally convinces his "superiors" that he's a loose cannon who knows of their devious scheme to restart the Cold War by blowing up the dignitaries at a historic peace accord. And all the while, Wallace thinks the bullets, Truth Serums, car chases and dead bodies are All Part of the Show.

It should be noted that, beyond the similar titles title which is obviously a reference (and superficial plot similarities), this film has nothing to do with Hitchcock's thriller The Man Who Knew Too Much.

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