Trivia / The Amazing World of Gumball

  • Adored by the Network:
    • Cartoon Network gave the series premier a huge buildup: a "sneak peek" six days before the premiere (which also aired on Boomerang and streamed on the website), a countdown bug on-screen the day of the premiere, and at least one rerun a day for the entire week afterward.
    • The Latin American version of Cartoon Network brings this trope Up to Eleven. They went to such extent to dedicate a whole day to the show. They also use them to announce the new stuff of the month and air reruns three times a day, everyday, and they often air clips of this show during the commercial breaks for no reason at all.
    • Cartoon Network also put a lot of faith into the show by renewing a second season a week before the premier, though this could have been done as the show spends a long time in production. Cartoon Network later renewed the show for a fourth and fifth season before the third season had even started airing and just renewed it for a sixth. Overall, next to Teen Titans Go, it's probably the network's most-aired series.
  • Children Voicing Children: The initial voice actors for Gumball (Logan Grove), Darwin (Kwesi Boakye), and Anais (Kyla Rae Kowalewski) took the roles at approximately the age of 12, 11, and 9, respectively. About three years later, Gumball and Darwin were recast for the third season due to puberty: Gumball's new voice actor (Jacob Hopkins) was 11 and Darwin's (Terrell Ransom Jr.) was 10. Anais's original voice actor continues to voice her even as she enters her teens as Kowalewski can still make her voice sound young — and the fact that girls' voices don't change as dramatically as boys' voices do during puberty.
  • Creator's Favorite Episode: A series of videos posted for Cartoon Network's Imagination Studios project had numerous staff talk about their favorite episodes (or possibly just their favorite in season three; the videos seem unclear).
    • Show creator Ben Bocquelet's favorite episode is the season finale "The Money".
    • Bocquelet's pet dog, Woody (yes, really) likes the episode "The Procrastinators".
    • Animator Yannis Boultadakis' favorite episode is "The Puppy".
    • Sarah Fell (producer) likes "The Pizza".
    • Richard Overall's (voice director and editor) favorite episode is "The Fraud".
    • Pascalita Bories (another animator) likes "The Joy" and considers Miss Simian her favorite character.
    • Juan Pedro's (another animator) favorite episode is "The Mothers".
    • Guillaume Cassuto's (one of the series writers) favorite episode is "The Shell".
  • The Danza: The character Teri (the hypochondriac paper cutout bear) is played by Teresa Gallagher. Given Teri is a supporting character and Gallagher also voices one of the main cast, this was probably a coincidence.
  • Dawson Casting: With the exception of the Watterson children, the kid characters are played by adults.
  • Descended Creator:
    • Sussie's model and first season voice actor is Aurelie Charbonnier, one of the show's storyboard artists and the creator's girlfriend. Her screams and laughs are provided by the show's creator and Charbonnier's boyfriend, Ben Bocquelet. As of season two, Fergus Craig is now the voice of Sussie on the rare times that Sussie speaks coherently, though Aurelie's chin is still used for the character and Ben Bocquelet still does Sussie's screaming and laughing.
    • Billy Parham is voiced by Richard Overall, the show's voice director and one of its editors. He also performed some of the songs that weren't sung by a character, such as "Because We're Men" in "The Mustache".
    • Mic Graves, the series's director, voices Banana Joe, Banana Joe's father Banana Bob, and the voiceover heard through "The Voice" which is actually William the flying eyeball's internal monologue.
  • Development Gag:
    • "The Mystery": The yearbook pictures for Alan and Tina both use their designs from the early reel.
    • The class photo in "The Curse" that gets impaled by pencils has everyone but Darwin and Gumball as they were in the early reel.
    • "The Fridge": Nicole puts war paint on her face during the paintball game. The way she does it covers her whiskers, making them look longer, and thus more like they did in her character model before it was redesigned for the second season.
    • "The Skull": When Clayton shapeshifts into Banana Joe's form, he looks like Joe's first season character model instead of his current one.
    • "The Bumpkin": Gumball tries to escape school by sitting on one side of the seesaw while Hector stomps on the other, the same thing he and Darwin did to try and escape from the school in the early reel.
    • "The Storm": Masami's crush on Alan is funnier when you realize that they were a couple in the pitch pilot.
    • "The Tape": The group shot where Gumball almost says the show's name is very similar to the end of one of the series's trailers, except that was in front of the Watterson house and everyone managed to say it.
    • "The Void": Darwin's CGI design from the pitch pilot can be seen floating around, as can a rejected design for the Watterson house.
  • Defictionalization: Elmore Stream is now real...sorta.
  • Fake American: Most of the cast besides the voice actors for Gumball, Darwin, and Anais are British, Scottish, or Irish voice actors doing American Accents. Technically averted with Dan Russellnote  and Sandra Searles Dickinsonnote , who are American actors based in the UK. Similarly, numerous characters are voiced by Kerry Shalenote , who is Canadian and currently living in London.
  • Fan Nickname: Penny (back when she was in her shell) and the rest of her family are often called "doe-nuts" because they're peanuts and she has antlers.
  • Flashback with the Other Darrin: A flashback in "The Name" redubs the scene from the first season episode "The Curse" where Gumball is riding down the highway in a mop bucket shouting, "I'm gonna make it! I'm gonna make it!" with Jacob Hopkins' voice instead of Logan Grove's. The same goes for a flashback with Darwin in "The Extras" to the second season episode "The Sweaters" where Darwin's line "This is boring! b-b-b-b-boring!" was done by Terrell Ransom, Jr. rather than Kwesi Boakye.
  • Image Source:
  • Inspiration for the Work:
    • Ben Bocquelet stated in the interview that the Working Title Gumball, which later became the main character's name, came from thinking of things a child would randomly have in his pocket.
    • The episode "The Money", particularly the climax where the Wattersons' lack of money causes the show's animation to get cruder and more low-budget until everyone—except Gumball—signs the contract, was inspired by the show's budget always running out by season's end.
    • The family copying the Wattersons in "The Copycats" is inspired by a real series of Chinese commercials that blatantly plagiarized Gumball's art style, character design, and even individual scenes. The commercial advertised a brand of goat milk called "Miracle Star", hence the scene where Gumball first meets his doppelganger while looking at containers of powdered goat milk. Early version of the episode actually featured the Miracle Star characters exactly, rather than parodies thereof in the final episode.
  • Jossed: "The Shell" revealed that Penny is actually a shapeshifting fairy. This pretty much blew away the popular fan theory that, because of her antlers, she was a deer under her shell.
  • The Other Darrin:
    • Gumball was voiced by Nicky Jones (aka Chowder) in the early reel version of the show while Darwin was voiced by Jake Pratt.
    • Between seasons 1 and 2, many characters changed voices:
      • Lewis MacLeod left the show entirely, so his roles were recast between Steve Furst (Principal Brown), Hugo Harold-Harrison (Ms. Simian and Rocky Robinson), and Dan Russell (the Doughnut Sheriff).
      • Rupert Degas also left, and his roles were passed to Adam Long (Mr. Small), Max Cazier (Clayton), Hugo Harold-Harrison (Tobias, one of the Eggheads) and Stefan Ashton Frank (Gaylord Robinson).
      • Aurelie Charbonnier was the original voice of Sussie in the show's first season. From season two to the present, British comedian Fergus Craig replaced Charbonnier as Sussie's speaking voice (while Charbonnier's chin is still used as the character and Bocquelet still does Sussie's screaming and laughter).
      • A few others changed voice actor despite their original voice actor still playing other characters: Alan the balloon and Idaho the potato went from both being voiced by Kerry Shale to both being voiced by Hugo Harold-Harrison; Carmen the cactus went from being voiced by Teresa Gallagher to being voiced by Alix Wilton Regan; Tina Rex went from being voiced by Dan Russell to being voiced by Stefan Ashton Frank.
    • Both Gumball and Darwin were recast in season three from Logan Grove and Kwesi Boakye to Jacob Hopkins and Terrell Ransom, Jr. respectively due to their original voice actors hitting puberty and sounding too old for their roles. The season three premiere "The Kids" is both a farewell to Grove and Boakye and an introduction to Hopkins and Ransom, Jr. They in turn were recast midway into season five by Nicolas Cantu and Donielle T. Hansley, Jr, respectively.
    • In the third season, Rocky went from Hugo Harold-Harrison to Simon Lipkin and Jamie the bully went from Jessica MacDonald to Maria Teresa Creasey, even though Harold-Harrison and MacDonald still voice other characters.
    • Almost all voices were recast in the Hungarian version after season 1, save Gumball, Darwin, Nicole, Anais and a few side characters. Season 3 changed even more voices, including Gumball's and Nicole's. Now Darwin, Anais, Banana Joe, and Penny are the only characters with their original voices.
  • Out of Order: Episodes often air out of production order, which was stated by one writer to be why no multi-part episodes were planned in its early episodes (there eventually were in the fourth season).
  • Prop Recycling: As mentioned in the main page quote, a lot of the characters on the show are rejected advertising mascots Ben Bocquelet had in his portfolio that he didn't want to throw out or remodel in the hopes they get accepted.
  • Series Hiatus: Likely because of its multi-medium format increasing production time and how everyone on staff works to make sure every episode is made with care, the first two seasons of Gumball took about one-and-a-half times as long to come out per episode as most cartoons of similar length, which is why there can be anywhere from three weeks to a couple of months between new episodes in the same season. By the third season, production apparently sped up, bringing it more in line with others shows on the same network.
  • Short Run in Peru: Several times the series has gone on an extended hiatus in the middle of a season, leading episodes to premiere in other countries before reaching U.S. and U.K. audiences:
    • UK: "The Mystery", "The Microwave", The Meddler", "The Fight", "The Apprentice", "The Hug", "The Wicked", and "The Scam"
    • Spain: "The Virus", "The Pony", "The Hero", "The Dream", "The Sidekick", "The Photo", and "The Storm"
    • Middle East and North Africa (Arabic dub): the last nine episodes of season two (from "The Promise" to "The Finale"), "The Origins" (also premiered in the Netherlands on the same day)
    • Chile: "The Oracle"
    • Latin America: "The Safety" (original English dialogue and not dubbed in Spanish)
    • Portugal (Portuguese dub): The last four episodes of season three ("The Downer", "The Egg", "The Triangle", and "The Money")
    • Canada: "The Scam"
  • Talking to Himself:
    • Hilariously, both Principal Brown and Ms. Simian were voiced by Lewis MacLeod in the first season, despite them being lovers.
    • Richard has had scenes where he talks to Mr. Fitzgerald, the Doughnut Sheriff (after season one), and the Ripley 2000 manager, all of whom are voiced by Dan Russell.
  • Troubled Production: The show's production had a rather rocky start because very few of the crew members hired were experienced in doing TV. This resulted in major organizational restructurings and numerous delays that the show's creator is thankful for not getting in trouble for.
  • Unfinished Episode:
    • Four episodes were scrapped in the first season: two were called "The Mom" and "The Pizza", the other two weren't named. The premise for the two named episodes may or may not have been reused for the season three episodes "The Mothers" and "The Pizza".
    • Season two had an episode planned called "The Rex" which would have fully introduced Tina's father and have been a parody of/homage to Jurassic Park. It was cut because it would have gone over budget. Mr. Rex eventually ended up showing up in full anyway in the fourth season episode "The Routine".
  • What Could Have Been:
    • Most of the characters of this show were originally going to be mascots for ads and company logos, but all of them were rejected. Penny, for instance, came from a commercial pitch to Nickelodeon and had a gun. Rather than get rid of them or redesign and re-pitch them in the hopes they'd be accepted, Ben Bocquelet superimposed them on a photograph of a school and decided to create a TV series using those characters.
    • In an interview (page 127), Ben Bocquelet revealed the show was originally envisioned as being about rejected cartoon characters being sent to a remedial school so they can become normal enough to star in an animated series. Daniel Lennard, the Vice President of Cartoon Network's European division, found the idea to be too depressing and was looking for family/kids' animated sitcoms, so Bocquelet turned the remedial school into an American junior high school and also added a focus on the main character's family. He also mentioned at one point hoping [adult swim] would be interested in some of his work, although, contrary to some claims, he never pitched Gumball itself to Adult Swim (and the claim that [adult swim] rejected the show for being "too cute" was actually attributed to the short-lived series The Problem Solverz).
    • The idea for Darwin's origin, a fish that grew legs, originated in an earlier show pitch by Bocquelet about a village of cryptids that lived in the backyard of a little boy's house, but were isolated from the rest of the world.
    • The show's name was originally planned to just be "Gumball" and not refer to any particular character. It was then decided to make that the main character's name, and from there the title expanded to The Amazing World of Gumball.
    • Gumball and Richard were at first both thought up as blue dogs, but they figured a family of cats and rabbits would be cuter. Gumball was then going to be a black cat, because he's very unlucky, but it was decided this would limit the stories he could be involved in and make him visually indistinct. Some early sketches of blue dog Richard and black cat Gumball have been posted.
    • An "Early Reel" was made for the show as a pilot (and is available on YouTube). The most noticeable differences are the fact Darwin was animated in CGI and Gumball had a square head, though other characters looked different too. Teri the paper bear was also a boy, there.
    • The people in "The Sweaters" from Richwood High were originally going to be Funny Animals like everyone else, rather than stiffly animated 70s/80s-cartoon-style humans.
    • Sarah G. Lato's name was originally going to be Dolly.
    • "The Downer" underwent a significant rewrite because the initial draft was considered too dark. Bocquelet refused to elaborate on how the first and final scripts differed, and, when asked for some storyboards, said that it was up to the storyboard artist to release that information. He would, however, later describe it as being "just lame".
    • Sarah's comic in "The Comic" was originally conceived as a parody of Rob Liefeld's style, but they liked the style the guest artist came up with better.
    • It was planned at some point for Penny and Gumball to break up in a Two-Part Episode, but this was abandoned in favor of the two staying together.
    • The doppelganger family from "The Copycats" were originally lifted wholesale from the Miracle Star commercials that inspired the episode, even sharing the same names and identical designs. Sometime between storyboarding and the finished episode, the names and designs were changed to be different, though still obviously similar (and even more like the Wattersons).
  • The Wiki Rule: Has a wiki here.
  • Word of God: According to this response regarding Nicole's reaction to buff!Richard in "The Diet" due to her not appearing in the episode, she prefers Richard the way he is, being fat and chubby, more than being buff.
  • Working Title: The show was first planned to just be called Gumball, but after deciding that would be the main character's name, it was lengthened to its final name. Some individual episodes also changed name mid-production:
    • "The World" was at one point named "The Objects".
    • "The Extras" was originally titled "The People"
    • "The Fraud" was originally called "The Phoney"
    • "The Void" was originally called "The Hole".
    • "The Boss" was originally called "The Heart" (and thus presumably Mr. Robinson's injury was heart-related instead of "stuffing deficiency").
    • "The Question" was originally "The Answer".
    • "The Origins" was originally "The Roots", though "The Roots" is repurposed as the title of a later episode in the same season.
  • Write What You Know:
  • Write Who You Know:
    • Ben Bocquelet has described Richard, Nicole, and Anais as caricatured versions of his family members that they're named after and Gumball as being based on his perception, as an adult, of what he was like as a kidalthough . Darwin was inspired by several childhood friends that spent so much time at Bocquelet's house that they felt like members of the family. One, named Paul, was also bald and had a similar personality.
    • Banana Joe's voice is a "lazy impersonation" of the show's storyboard revisionist Chuck Klein.

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