Trivia / Grease

The 1978 film

  • AFIS 100 Years 100 Passions: #97
  • AFIS 100 Years 100 Songs:
    • #70, "Summer Nights"
  • AFIS Greatest Movie Musicals: #20
  • Canoodling For Your Art: Jeff Conaway really did give those hickeys to Stockard Channing.
  • Cut Song: A good number of the Broadway songs did not make it into the film, or were changed into background tunes. However, the Broadway production itself cut or altered musical numbers for timing purposes. Most of the below examples were reinstated for the 2011 ''Original Grease'' production in Chicago:
    • "Foster Beach" was changed to "Summer Nights", as Broadway producers felt audiences would not be familiar with the beach (a Chicago-specific locale on Lake Michigan).
    • Patty and Miss Lynch originally had solo numbers, but both were cut.
    • Before the movie would have its own titular song, there was an Act II number called "Grease" that was dropped (it would also be reprised as the final musical number). Another song called "Boogie Man Boogie" was cut and replaced with "Born To Hand Jive".
    • Besides "It's Raining On Prom Night", Sandy had a solo number called "Kiss It" (in the Original Grease, this comes before "All Choked Up", the song created to replace it in the Broadway script).
    • Doody's song was originally in Act II and titled "Rock Progression", but it was moved to Act I and rewritten to be "Those Magic Changes". "Rock N' Roll Party Queen" was created for the second act instead.
    • The Burger Palace Boys were to have two songs entitled "The Tattoo Song" and "Comin' At Ya", but these were cut before the Kingston Mines premiere.
    • "How Big I'm Gonna Be" was a song cut before rehearsals of the Kingston Mines production began. It explored a greaser's idea of success in life, and became Danny's solo in the American Theater Company's 2011 stage remake of the original Grease. The song is used as a response to Sandy's challenge that Danny do something with his life.
  • Dawson Casting: Most blatantly with Olivia Newton-John and Stockard Channing. By the time the film came out, Channing was 34 (and actually old enough to have been in high school in 1959) and Newton-John was pushing 30. At least those two have fairly youthful faces — Annette Charles (Cha-Cha), with her chiselled facial features, looks to be in her late thirties (or even early forties), and is in no way credible as a high school student.
  • Keep Circulating the Tapes: The original, theatrical edition of Grease has never received an official home video release. VHS and laserdisc releases before 1998 boasted Pan and Scan picture, while the widescreen VHS/laserdisc/DVD/Blu-Ray/digital copy versions from 1998 onward boast updated Paramount logos and a remixed soundtrack (sourced from the 20th anniversary theatrical re-release).
  • What Could Have Been: Steven Krantz and Ralph Bakshi originally had the rights to the film adaptation to Grease, and had wanted to do it as an animated musical. When Krantz and Bakshi's partnership fell through, Robert Stigwood acquired the film rights.
    • Harry Reems was originally considered for Couch Calhoun, but didn't get the part as Paramount executives feared controversy from casting a porn star in the film.

The 2016 live version

  • Actor Allusion: The line "Who wants to watch a bunch of amateurs in a dance contest on live TV?" regarding the National Bandstand is one to Julianne Hough, who rose to fame thanks to Dancing with the Stars, which is built on this premise.
    • Sandy is from Utah, and has strict parents who won't let her go to dances. Hough is also from Utah, and noted a strict upbringing in behind-the-scenes material for the DVD/Blu-Ray release - most notably, that her parents wouldn't let her watch the movie version of Grease because of its raciness; she had to sneak viewings.
    • In this version, Patty was quite jealous of Sandy after being shown up at cheerleader tryouts. In the original national tour and Broadway versions of the Bring It On musical, Elle McLemore played the conniving cheerleader Eva, though her Patty is nowhere near as bad as Eva was.
  • Blooper: In the 2016 version, "We Go Together" was, as it always is, the show's closing number. The carnival took place inside the school's gym, but "We Go Together" was to finish at the town square on the Warner Bros. studio lot. The entirety of the cast ran out of the gym, and hopped on to separate carts that are used to take people on tours of the lot. The main cast, with Aaron Tveit driving, hopped into the first cart. The carts had to navigate around a tight right-hand turn on their way to the square. Tveit successfully navigated the turn with no issue. The cart behind him however, with Wendell Pierce and Eve Plumb (yes, Jan Brady herself) on board, took the turn too tightly. The right rear wheel clipped the curb, and for a millisecond, the right side tires were off the ground. Luckily, the cart landed on all four wheels with no issue. If an accident had occurred, it would've greatly overshadowed a production that got great reviews and ratings.
  • Casting Gag: In the 2016 version, Johnny Casino's band is portrayed by DNCE, Joe Jonas' currrent act. It may be hard to notice at first due to the characters talking over it, but the song the band performs during the slow dance part of the prom, before "Born to Hand Jive", is a doo-wop version of their Signature Song, "Cake By The Ocean".
  • Dawson Casting: The youngest major character is Jordan Fisher (then 21) as Doody. Most egregiously the main cast included 32-year-old Aaron Tveit and 30-year-old Kether Donohue and Carly Rae Jepsen.
  • Fake American: Leo, leader of the Scorpions, was played by Australian Sam Clark, who used an American accent for the role.
  • In Memoriam: The 2016 live performance was dedicated to Vanessa Hudgens's father, Greg, who died of cancer the day before.
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