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Series: Ultraman Tiga

Ultraman Tiga is a tokusatsu series, part of the Ultra Series franchise, that lasted 1996-1997.

30 million years ago, beings of light came to Earth during mankind's infancy. Seeing the potential for humanity to become superior beings amongst the galaxy, the beings of light set up a colony to help and guide humanity. The beings of light also neutralize and control a horde of giant monsters who once roamed the Earth with their destructive ways. Using their powers, the beings of light either destroyed the monsters or tamed them, allowing humans to live with no fear of predators.

Malevolent factions within the colony began to oppose their own kind, stressing that they should remain the superior race and to subjugate humanity lest they rise and overtake them. A civil war erupts, destroying the colony and the beings of light, and regresses humanity to the point that it will take millenia for humans to achieve powers beyond their scope.

Three of these beings, which the pre-historic humans with their telepathic powers dubbed "Ultras" survived the war and imbued humanity with their DNA powers of light, hoping to one day jumpstart the humans back to greatness. The last of the great advanced humans, a woman named Yuzare, is chosen to be the keeper of the light, and leaves behind clues throughout time that one day, the monsters will rise again, and beings of light will be needed to combat them yet once more.

With various monsters rising from the Earth in modern times, the United Nations forms the T.P.C. — the Terrestrial Peace Consortium, a think tank looking for ways to neutralize the monsters. T.P.C. itself forms G.U.T.S. — Global Unlimited Task Squad, a strike team made up of combat specialists to counter the monsters if no other option but force is warranted.

On an archeological dig, T.P.C. discovers a pyramid-like device left by Yuzare fortelling the prophecy of the monsters, and that only the beings of light can beat them. The G.U.T.S. team heads out to a location given to them by Yuzare's message and discover a previously-invisible pyramid housing statues of the 3 Ultras that survived the war. A monster arises and destroys two of the three statues, but a beam of light contacts G.U.T.S. Officer Madoka Daigo, informing him that he is a true blood lineage to the DNA of the Ultras and awakens a power within him to save the entire world.

Using his inner heroism, his passion for justice, and his commitment for defending the innocent, Madoka Daigo accepts his heritage as the inheritor of the greatest power of them all — hope, as this era's Ultraman Tiga!

In 2002, Ultraman Tiga was dubbed in English by 4Kids in an attempt to revive Ultraman amongst U.S. audiences. Rather than a direct translation of the source material, this dub was an Affectionate Parody, paying homage to Peter Fernandez's terrible, yet unintentionally hilarious 1966 Ultraman dub. However, this time around, the dub takes it to another level, as it's filled with a plethora of lampshading humor. Audiences weren't amused, however, and the show was abandoned about halfway through.


Ultraman Tiga provides examples of the following tropes:

  • Acting for Two: Hiroshi Nagano plays both Daigo and an errand boy/intern named Nagano in episode 46.
  • Adult Fear: Giranbo disguises itself as a kindly old woman before giving out drugged candy on Halloween and kidnapping children.
  • Big Bad: Gatanazoa in the series, although in The Final Odyssey it is revealed to be really Kamila, the queen of darkness and Tiga's former lover and the one that converted him into a giant of darkness.
  • Bowdlerize: 4Kids Entertainment's infamous Gag Dub of it. Fortunately, an uncut, subbed DVD set was released, sadly out of print.
  • Clap Your Hands If You Believe: How Tiga is revived at the end of the series, complete with the power of children being responsible.
  • The Comically Serious: The Gag Dub makes Munakata this for comedic effect. The deep, brooding voice in contrast to the tone of everything else doesn't help.
  • Continuity Reboot: Apparently the original intent, but team-up occasions disagree. It starts with the original teaming up with Tiga in one episode.
  • Conveniently Empty Building: In episode 3, the G.U.T.S. crew remarks that it's a good thing the building that got smashed earlier was under construction because it Could Have Been Messy otherwise. No, that was not a dub addition.
  • Cool Starship: Artdessei, the centrepiece of the opening sequence, which comes complete with a Wave Motion Gun.
  • Eldritch Abomination: Gatanazoa, the Ruler of Darkness. He's actually heavily based off Ghatanothoa, an elder evil from the Cthulhu Mythos — actually Cthulhu's son!
  • Evil Counterpart: Kyrieloid, the giant guardian of fire demons race Kirie — much like Tiga being guardian of humans. From their point of view, Kyrieloid is rightful protector of Earth since Kirie inhabiting Earth much longer. Its successor, Kyrieloid II even has ability to switch forms like Tiga. And then we have the Dark Ultramen from The Final Oddyssey movie.
  • Evil Twin: Evil Tiga
  • Golden Super Mode: Glitter Tiga, a form that Tiga obtains when every child on earth empowers him with their light. He gains it again in "The Final Odyssey" when the destroyed Giants Of Light send Tiga their power.
  • Gilligan Cut
    Horii: I'm just glad the other monster didn't show up today.
    (cut to a monster rising from the ground)
    • It happens in the original in the second episode. The G.U.T.S. team dispatches a monster without an Ultra in sight, leading to Tempting Fate at its best: "Well, that was a breeze. I'm almost looking forward to the next time we meet a monster..." (ground shakes, the second monster comes out of the ground).
  • Gratuitous English: The theme song.
  • Groin Attack: Tiga dispatched more than one monster with these.
  • Hong Kong Dub: Much like the original 1966 English Dub, Tiga's Gag Dub naturally falls into this.
  • Hour of Power: As ever. However, this one is not from some nebula and being weakened by Earth's conditions, so you'd expect that he wouldn't suffer from the three-minute time limit. Worse, he has a tendency to fly off way into the sky/distance instead of just out of sight after a battle. If he ran out of juice in midair... However, the danger of timing out is reduced in this series; only under special circumstances can an M78 Ultra survive this ("...If it should stop, Ultraman will never rise again!") but Tiga will only demorph. Though that's a bad thing if there's a Kaiju trying to kill you, or again, if you're in midair or some other human-unfriendly environment.
  • Ice-Cream Koan: Played with in the Gag Dub. The dialogue purposely renders the scene just as useless as the sayings used in it. For laughs, of course.
    "I have an old saying. One weird sight cannot be right. But make it three...it has to be. What's yours?"
    "A ship in time saves nine."
    "Ugh. That's wrong. It's a STITCH in time. And it doesn't even apply...you're COMPLETELY OFF!"
  • It's A Small World After All: Lampshaded in the Gag Dub.
    Daigo: All that changed one night with the arrival of a meteor that seemed to steer its own descent to Earth. It aroused even more suspicion because of how close it landed to TPC headquarters.
  • Just Testing You: In the Gag Dub, Daigo insists that the team must find Tiga to prepare for Melba and Golza's imminent attack. Megumi is convinced that the land of Tiga doesn't exist. Low and behold, Yazumi is able to pinpoint the exact location of Tiga... to which Megumi plays this trope straight.
  • Kill It with Fire: Kilieroid
  • Mascot Mook: Golza
  • Meaningful Name: Tiga means "Three" in Malay/Indonesian.
  • Multiform Balance
  • Mythology Gag: Daigo meets both Eiji Tsuburaya and the original Ultraman in Episode 46.
  • New Powers as the Plot Demands: Episode 13 shows that Tiga can transform to a human-sized version of himself. Technically, every Ultra can do this; they turn spandexy and then turn giant, so there's no reason one can't fight human-sized-threats without growing. However, this power is only seen in this series and on extremely rare occasion. Of course, in the Ultra Series, non-giant threats are themselves quite rare.
  • Older than They Look: The Gag Dub lampshades this with Yuzare's appearance after the team views the holographic message.
    Doctor: I know that it may seem as if this time capsule is real but... she looks too good to be 30 million years old.
  • Say My Name: "DAIGOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!"
  • Shout-Out: A distress signal in Gag Dub does this.
    "Do not adjust your TV set. There is nothing wrong. The recording is designed to appear wavy."
  • Taken for Granite
    • The Gakumas in episode 2 also did this, but they were easily taken out.
    • Tiga is transformed back into a statue after he was defeated by Gatanozoa in episode 51.
  • Time Travel: Goldras
  • Wave-Motion Tuning Fork: The G.U.T.S. Wing 2 aircaft has one.


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alternative title(s): Ultraman Tiga
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