troperville

tools

toys

Wiki Headlines
We've switched servers and will be updating the old code over the next couple months, meaning that several things might break. Please report issues here.

main index

Narrative

Genre

Media

Topical Tropes

Other Categories

TV Tropes Org
random
Manga: Sailor Moon

This page covers the manga and 1990s anime. For the entire franchise, see Franchise.Sailor Moon.

A famous manga (and anime adaptation) created by pharmacist-turned-manga-author Naoko Takeuchi.

Sailor Moon tells the story of Usagi Tsukino, a clumsy and lazy 14-year-old underachiever whose life takes a turn for the unexpected when she discovers that she is the Reincarnation of an ancient lunar warrior from the Moon Kingdom. With the aid of a feline mentor called Luna, Usagi must take up the mission of defending the Earth from the various evils that threaten it while searching for the reincarnation of the Moon Kingdom's princess.

Over the course of a year, Usagi grows into her role as the Magical Girl Sailor Moon and greatly matures as a result, gathering a team of four other reincarnated warriors and realising her true potential as both a fighter and a growing young woman. The series itself mostly follows a Monster of the Week format, with subsequent series introducing escalating foes and matching power-ups, and greatly expanding the mythos behind Usagi's past life in the Moon Kingdom and her fated future in the utopian Crystal Tokyo.

The show ended up licensed all over the world throughout a good portion of The Nineties, and practically every country/region received its own international dubs, all of which thoroughly displaced the original work (which itself heavily displaced the original manga). The regulation of translation accuracy, adaptation for ease of viewing, and editing due to local censorship concerns varied wildly by region, but thanks to the concurrent flowering of Internet fan communities, fans became aware of these changes (loudly, in the case of the North American fandom) sometimes well before episodes aired.

The original English dub was produced by DiC for the first two seasons, and recorded at Optimum Productions in Toronto, Canada. This English dub was heavily edited and reduced the first 89 episodes to 82 with many plot-points changed, and characters renamed. The show initially aired in strip syndication in the US in 1995, but was a ratings failure and moved to cable on the USA Network and later to Cartoon Network's Toonami block in 1998, becoming their first anime hit and the show credited with starting the anime boom in the late 90s/early 2000s. To this day, Sailor Moon remains one of the most recognized and mainstream anime titles in the US. If you approach anyone on the street and ask them to name a Japanese anime, Sailor Moon will almost certainly be one of the natural responses, along with Pokémon and Dragon Ball Z.

When DiC was unable (or declined, depending on who you ask) to license future episodes, Cloverway (Toei's US branch) teamed up with YTV in Canada and Cartoon Network in the US to localize future episodes (Cloverway had previously worked with Geneon and Optimum to bring the movies to the states). They ended up dubbing all of the third and fourth seasons with Optimum Productions returning as dubbing studio (although few of the original voice actors actually returned). These dubbed episodes were visually uncut (though lightly edited for TV), but continued localizing names and plot points. Most infamously, Sailor Uranus and Sailor Neptune's lesbian relationship was changed into them being "cousins" instead.

The original US home video releases were handled by ADV Films (Seasons 1-2) and Geneon (Seasons 3-4 plus the movies). Both companies released English-subtitled versions of their respective episodes in addition to the English-dubbed versions (the visual uncut status of the Cloverway episodes meant Geneon's releases were billingual), with ADV's releases in particular being heavily criticized for being of poor quality. Around 2003, Toei quietly pulled all licenses to the franchise worldwide, which means non-bootlegged DVDs went on to cost a hefty sum of money. This license pull happened right when Sailor Stars sat on the cusp of getting dubbed into English (which means that season never got dubbed or released in the States). Toei has shopped the show (in its entirety) around again in recent years, and many countries have begun rebroadcasting the series or releasing it to DVD — but only using their old dubs (Southeast Asian languages aside). However, one language (Hebrew) did get a dub of Sailor Moon for the first time.

In 2012, Toei Animation revealed plans for a new Sailor Moon series. Originally planned for the summer 2013 and winter 2013/2014 seasons, it eventually started airing in July of 2014, and it's streamed worldwide. The new version, called Sailor Moon Crystal, follows the manga version instead of the original anime. It will be released in North America by Viz Media... and is being accompanied by a completely remastered, re-dubbed, uncut version of the entire 200-episode original television series.In May 2014, the original anime began streaming the newly subtitled version on Hulu via Neon Alley and the new dub, produced in Los Angeles by Studiopolis, began streaming for a short time in September 2014, with the billingual DVD/Blu-ray releases beginning November 2014.

Sailor Moon received several Video Game Adaptation games between 1993 and 2004, including a fan project by Destiny Revival based on Final Fight and Double Dragon variants of Beat 'em Up games.

Back when it ran under the name Mixx Comics, Tokyo Pop picked up the original manga as one of its first series; all of their releases, however, went out of print in 2005. Kodansha picked up the slack starting in 2011 by using the 2003 Japanese reprints as the base for a new printing of the series.

The manga has a prequel in Codename: Sailor V (well, a prequel of sorts, anyway; the first issue got released before Sailor Moon, but the series itself finished after Sailor Moon ended). An aborted American live-action/animation blend adaption also exists; a company called Toon Makers pitched this to Toei instead of the dub, but since Toei didn't pick it up, a two-minute music video put together using footage from the pilot Toon Makers produced remains the only footage ever seen by the general public. You can find more information on this project at Toon Makers Sailor Moon.

This page has a character sheet; please put character-specific tropes there instead of adding them here.

Because of the massive amount of tropes associated with Sailor Moon, we've split the trope listing into three separate pages:

RugratsPrime Time CartoonSailor Moon Crystal
Saber Marionette JCreator/TokyopopScrapped Princess
SaikanoMadmanEntertainment/Anime And MangaSaiyuki
Porco RossoAnime of the 1990sShin-chan
The Punisher (Capcom)Beat 'em UpScott Pilgrim
Revolutionary Girl UtenaCreator/Neon AlleySailor Moon Crystal
The Sacred BlacksmithFantasy Anime & MangaSailor Moon Crystal
Sabrina: The Animated SeriesCreator/Di C EntertainmentSherlock Holmes in the 22nd Century
Rumiko TakahashiCreator/GeneonSaiyuki
Robot Girls ZCreator/Toei AnimationSailor Moon Crystal
Sailor MoonTrope OverdosedScooby-Doo
Rurouni KenshinCreator/HuluSailor Moon Crystal
    Franchise/Sailor MoonCodename: Sailor V
Ristorante ParadisoCreator/VIZ MediaSailor Moon Crystal
Harlem BeatThe NinetiesThe Addams Family
Rune Soldier LouieCreator/Section 23 FilmsSaint Seiya
Road RoversCreator/Cartoon NetworkSkunk Fu!
X Marks the HeroImageSource/Anime And MangaAnnoying Younger Sibling
Sabrina: The Animated SeriesThe Renaissance Age of AnimationSaint Seiya

alternative title(s): Sailor Moon; Bishoujo Senshi Sailor Moon
random
TV Tropes by TV Tropes Foundation, LLC is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available from thestaff@tvtropes.org.
Privacy Policy
14485
30