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Sacrificial Revival Spell
"I couldn't have done it without your pathetic, self-loathing, self-destructive desire to sacrifice yourself for your family!"
Azazel, Supernatural

Heroic Sacrifice meets Balancing Death's Books with a Cross Over by Cast from Hit Points taken Up to Eleven.

Bob couldn't save Alice in time to prevent her death. After mourning her loss, he discovers that he has a revival spell (possibly a Useless Useful Spell or Dangerous Forbidden Technique) available to him. He uses it, and presto! She's alive again. But, suddenly Bob collapses and dies. It seems the spell required the user to sacrifice his life to bring back that of another.

Rarely used in Video Games (with the possible exception cutscenes or some Roguelikes), since the stakes tend to be lower, considering that there are often some other ways of reviving party members.

For this trope to apply, all of these conditions must be met:

Can be part of a Self-Sacrifice Scheme. If the spell is not guaranteed to revive the target and fails, it's a Stupid Sacrifice. If the character asks another character to initiate the exchange, it's Take Me Instead. If age is exchanged, it's Cast from Lifespan. If the caster doesn't actually die, it's Negate Your Own Sacrifice and not this trope.

Compare Holy Is Not Safe (if the spell isn't Black Magic), Balancing Death's Books (for when Death gets involved), Heroic Sacrifice (for the non-magical form), Someone Has to Die, Cast from Hit Points (for when the caster needn't necessarily die).

A Darker and Edgier Sub-Trope of Equivalent Exchange and Heroic Sacrifice.


Examples:

    open/close all folders 

    Anime and Manga 
  • An amusing but but still touching instance of this occurs late in the Buu saga of Dragon Ball Z. The beyond ancient Old Supreme Kai gives up his life energy so Goku, as a dead man stuck in other world, can fight elsewhere/live normally again. His halo vanishes and the Old Kai, without pain or distress, gains one.
  • In Fullmetal Alchemist, Ed is killed by Envy, then Alphonse transmutes his own life into Ed's, then Ed transmutes his life and body into Al's life and a new body for him, to boot. Alphonse can't repeat the process after that because Ed gets stuck in a parallel universe.
  • In Naruto, Lady Chiyo uses a secret reanimation jutsu to resurrect Gaara, but at the cost of her own life.
    • Later, Nagato does this as well, but because his power makes him something close to a Physical God, he's able to revive the several thousand Konoha villagers he murdered with his strongest attack before expiring from it.
  • One of the Forbidden Spells in Ojamajo Doremi is bringing someone back from the dead, for the exact reason of it basically being a trade of lives. We see the cast attempt this once in a flashback: We see Momoko attempt to bring Majo Monroe back to life after Majo Monroe had died. Momoko doesn't suffer the penalty simply because the spell doesn't work; Momoko's magical power is still too weak. It's heavily implied that if it had worked, Momoko would have been killed.
  • Toward the end of the Scryed anime, Scherris Adjani finds and uses her "Eternal Devote" alter power on Ryuhou shortly after he's killed by Big Bad Kyouji Mujo. His agony and gratitude upon seeing her deceased boost his power.
  • In YuYu Hakusho, this was Kurama's reason for stealing the Forlorn Hope, a magic mirror that grants any wish, but kills the user to do so. He was going to use it to save his terminally ill mother. Subverted in that Yusuke prevents this by joining him in the wish, so the Forlorn Hope takes half of their lives to save her.

    Comic Books 
  • In Thorgal, Thorgal is in a place with bright glowing strings all around him representing human lives. He will only get his life back if he cuts a single one, killing the person. He refuses, but Shaniah, the girl who'd followed him (and is desperately in love with him) cuts it herself. Thorgal gets back to life, but as they leave, she fades away, as it was her own lifeline she'd cut.
  • BIONICLE Adventures: Matoro sacrifices himself with the help of the Mask of Life to save Mata Nui's life and, in turn, the Matoran Universe.
  • The Grandmaster, one of Marvel Comics' Elders of the Universe, once challenged Death to a game with the life of fellow Elder the Collector as the stakes. After the Grandmaster won, Death revealed that the artifact the Grandmaster won would kill him to use. The Grandmaster went ahead and used it.

    Literature 
  • Happens in the end of Dragon Age: Asunder, where Wynne transfers the Spirit of Faith that's been keeping her alive for many years to the fallen Templar Evangeline, resurrecting her but dying instead.
  • Destined to Lead One of their rules of magic is that in order to bring back the dead, the spellcaster must 1. Die. 2.Go to the realm of the dead and ask if they want to be brought back to life. 3.1. If the dead fea says 'Yes' their spirit now inhabits the spellcaster's body- the spellcaster is still dead. 3.2. If they say 'No', both of them remain dead. These people are referred to in-universe as 'Returneds'.
  • In A Song of Ice and Fire, Beric Dondarrion, a follower of the fire god R'hllor and a repeated target of a more conventional resurrection power attributed to that deity, somehow developed this power and sacrificed his own life to raise Catelyn Stark from the dead. Or maybe it's the same power of "the Kiss of Life" Thoros used on him, but Beric is a layman, not a priest, and cannot cast the full version himself safely. He was unwilling to live on, anyways, because resurrection in this world is always flawed and damages the returning soul.

     Tabletop Games 
  • In Pathfinder, there is a Monk archetype that focuses on using ones own Ki energy to fuel healing magics, harming oneself in the process. At 20th level, said monk can sacrifice his own life to revive all his allies as per the True Resurrection spell. Taken Up to Eleven, as in a world where Death Is Cheap, this technique not only kills the user beyond the power of mortal or deity magic, but also eliminates all memories any other person has, and erases all written records of his/her existence.
  • Magic: The Gathering has Doomed Necromancer, which are sacrificed to bring back another card from the graveyard. Though judging by the illustration depicting the necromancer being throttled by the resurrectee, it's more like an example of Turned Against Their Masters.

    Video Games 
  • Dragon Quest: Kerplunk does this with everyone in your party that is dead. It also removes all of your MP so you can't just have your newly revived healer revive you so you can use it again.
    • There's a Magic Dance version of the spell. There is also a piece of equipment that automatically casts it once the character dies, but destroys itself in the process.
  • Final Fantasy XII has the Revive Technick, but you didn't get it until long after you got the basic Raise spell, and it was also on the market next to the more useful Arise Spell. It becomes more useful in the international version however, due to the new job system meaning that not everyone in the party is going to have access to Raise/Arise.
  • In Persona 3, Chidori revives Junpei after he was shot by Strega, at the cost of her own life.
  • In some entries in the Shin Megami Tensei series, the Recarmdra spell will revive all fallen party members at the cost of killing the caster. In games where the caster's death means game over, it instead reduces their HP to One.
  • The MMORPG in Yureka has the Sacrifice spell, which not only kills you but makes you lose levels and randomises your stats. And has a less than 100% success rate. However, one character manages to avoid Awesome, but Impractical by using it on an NPC who loves her, causing him to enter an Unstoppable Rage.
  • Lufia: The Ruins of Lore has the Sacrifice skill, which kills the caster to heal the target to full HP. Unless you use it on yourself, in which case it just heals you to full HP. Presumably, it kills the user first and then heals the target, but the programmers forgot to put in code to prevent you from having the user use it on themself.
  • Quest for Glory IV has Erana's Staff have this function, Toby sacrifices himself to bring his Undead Child master back to life as a human.
  • Valkyrie Profile has Lenneth able to grant this to others if they ask. She never forces anyone. The spell also exists in general in the game; one rule, however, is that it cannot be reversed. If someone is resurrected this way, and they try to resurrect the original sacrificer; both stay dead.
Jumping on a GrenadeHeroic SacrificesSelf Destructive Charge
Restraining BoltMagic and PowersSituational Sword
Rolling AttackVideo Game Effects and SpellsSecondary Fire
Sacrificed Basic Skill for Awesome TrainingPower at a PriceSensory Overload

alternative title(s): Sacrificial Revive; Revive Kills Caster
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