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Pregnant Hostage

One of the lesser known risks of pregnancy.

It seems to be a law of TV and film land, that any hostage situation will include at least one heavily pregnant woman. This can either be used to show how inhuman the hostage takers are by having them use her as greater leverage, or to show them in a better light by having them treat her with compassion. If she's more than eight months, she'll probably go into labor, and give birth to a healthy baby with the help of a nearby know-it-all kid, med-school dropout or, if they're really lucky, an off-duty nurse. Or maybe even one of the hostage takers. The Panicky Expectant Father will rarely be held hostage with her, and may even be with the police constantly telling them "My Wife's in there!".

Either way, expect her to be the first one let go if the authorities arrange the release of some hostages as a sign of good faith, and additionally most hostage takers know it's usually not in their favor to have such a possibly high maintenance hostage.

Alternatively, expect the hostage takers to end up in a world of hurt for pressing the Berserk Button of the Pregnant Badass.

Sub-Trope of Imperiled in Pregnancy.


Examples: (expect spoilers)

    open/close all folders 

    Comicbooks 
  • Kang tries to do this with Jessica Jones in Young Avengers, and learns that it's a bad idea to threaten a pregnant woman with superpowers when she kicks the BFG out of his hands and points it at him.
  • In the second issue of the 2011 series of Suicide Squad, it is revealed that the MacGuffin the Squad is sent into the stadium to retrieve is a pregnant woman. Although, this being Suicide Squad, all is not as it seems.

    Fan Fiction 

    Film 
  • Die Hard plays with it. Shortly after Hans and his crew take over, they're informed by Holly that one of the hostages is pregnant. Hans rolls his eyes until Holly clarifies that she's not due for a few weeks, but just needs something more comfortable to sit on. He's willing to oblige, to a point.
    • Mostly because he's planning on killing them all anyway, and just needs to keep them docile until then.
  • In The Way of the Gun, Ryan Philippe and Benicio del Toro kidnap a heavily pregnant Juliette Lewis.
  • Double Team
  • John Q.
  • Inside Man
  • In Hold-Up, the bank robber Grimm takes, among other people, a pregnant woman with a baby carriage hostage. Turns out that she's one of his accomplices, the pregnancy is faked to smuggle the money out of the bank in her false belly, and there isn't a baby in the carriage but even more money.
  • Inverted in 5 Branded Women where a pregnant Partisan captures a German hostage.
  • The Delta Force gives us an Arab hijacker who swears the Germans didn't kill enough Jews in World War II, pummels a sailor nearly to death with a chair's armrest, and flies off the handle when he sees an abandoned ring with Hebrew script on it, yet orders some hostages to vacate their seats so a pregnant hostage can recline. He even has the other hostages give up their pillows for her. Aaaawwwww.....

    Literature 
  • In The Sacred Art of Stealing, this trope is used to hint that the bank robbers aren't the bad guys. They immediately set free any hostage who is pregnant or has a heart condition.
  • In Camber of Culdi, one of the fifty human hostages taken after a Deryni lord is murdered is a pregnant woman. Cathan MacRorie pleads for their release and is offered the chance to take one of them; he first chooses the pregnant woman, only to be asked if he wants her or her baby. Cathan tries to argue, then chooses to take a teenaged boy instead. The woman gives birth in captivity and is later hanged like the rest of the hostages.
  • She is the main female lead and not obviously pregnant, but nonetheless this happens in The Lesser Kindred.
  • In Steven Gould's Helm, the post-climactic confrontation involves the desperate son of the villain choosing a pregnant girl from among 20 hostages and holding a dagger to her throat. But she's very pregnant—so much so that her water breaks during the showdown, startling the bad guy into a human reaction that momentarily shakes up his screw-em-all villainy.
  • Breezepelt does this to Poppyfrost, a heavily pregnant she-cat, in Warrior Cats and even threatens to kill her to frame Jayfeather. Surprisingly, it's not Poppyfrost's mate who saves her but Jayfeather and a deceased Honeyfern, who was Poppyfrost's sister.
  • Poor, poor 15 year old Diana Ladris from FEAR. No one bothers trying to bail her out *Or rather, they couldn't if they tried*, either. And she's left to give birth in a scorching hot, pitch black mine with two pyshcopaths who like to torture her. Fans of the character were reasonably miffed.
  • The Dresden Files: In Grave Peril, the Nightmare abducts Michael's heavily pregnant wife Charity. The stress and trauma of her rescue causes her to go into labour.
  • Done somewhat differently in Discworld, in The Fifth Elephant, when the diplomatic carriage carrying the Ankh Morpork delegation to Bonk is ambushed by bandits in the pass. Sybil is briefly held hostage as a bargaining chip, but at this point, Sam Vimes has no idea that Sybil is pregnant, and frankly, Sybil is a bit of a Pregnant Badass about it, keeping her calm and ducking so her husband can shoot the bandit holding her, with a weapon she doesn't even know he has. She's actually trying (not for the first time) to get his attention long enough to gently break the news to him just before the ambush.

    Live-Action TV 
  • In the Diagnosis: Murder episode "Baby Boom'', a kidnapper strapped with explosives holds a class full of pregnant women hostage.
  • A pregnant bank teller was one of the hostages in the Flashpoint episode "Who's George?"
    • This happened again in the later episode "Aisle 13."
    • And again in "Remote Control".
  • In an episode of F/X: The Series, the villain put a gun to a pregnant woman's stomach. Subverted since the woman wasn't pregnant and was really The Mole giving information from the outside after being released.
  • Happens in an episode of House.
  • In the Power Rangers Time Force finale, the pregnant hostage is the reason for Nadira's Heel-Face Turn. The stress apparently sends the woman into labor, and Trip convinces/forces Nadira to help her give birth. Her amazement leads her to question her father's hatred of humans, and she attempts to protect a (different) baby from one of her father's attacks. The realization that he could have killed his daughter is what leads to Big Bad Ransik's Heel-Face Turn.
  • Happened at least twice on Law & Order: SVU. One was a 12-year-old girl with religiously- inspired Stockholm Syndrome... that is, until the week's Cult Colony Cloud Cuckoo Lander Big Bad says a Blasphemous Boast that earns him a couple of pistol slugs straight to Hell.
  • In CSI: New York, the season finale had Mac involved in a hostage situation in a bank. The first person he convinces the man to release is pregnant.
  • In Stargate Atlantis, Teyla gets kidnapped while pregnant. Unusually for this trope, Teyla doesn't escape the hostage situation until after the baby is born (by design.)
  • The "Derailed" episode of Criminal Minds had a pregnant hostage. An interesting twist though, as she was only a few weeks pregnant at the time and on her way to have an abortion. The events of the episode seem to point toward her changing her mind.
  • This happens in the Medium episode "Joe Day Afternoon".
  • One Touched by an Angel episode had a bank heist where the robber ordered the pregnant bank teller to go into the safe-deposit area to grab a valuable item. Then a gas leak explosion traps her in there and he orders the other hostages to help him dig her out. It turns out he's her husband and the father of her baby - they were desperate for money and planned it together.
  • Janis Hawk in the finale of FlashForward (2009).
  • In the "Backscatter" episode of NUMB3RS, one of the hostages was pregnant.
  • Castle: in "Cops and Robbers" one of the bank tellers in the bank that Castle and his mother are unlucky enough to be in when it gets held up is pregnant. She doesn't go into labour or have any kind of risky pregnancy from what we see, however. Castle does use her pregnancy as an excuse to go to a couch by the windows, however, ostensibly to get her pillows to sit up on but actually because he has a message he wants to get to the cops outside.
  • My Name Is Earl: In "Randy in Charge (...of Our Days and Our Nights)", Earl has to point out to Frank that the very pregnant Joy makes the perfect hostage for a hostage situation.
  • Unknown to her, Amaka is pregnant when she's held hostage by the baby's father in Tinsel.
  • Invoked by the Leverage team when they get locked inside a patent office with the aid of a device for expectant fathers to "share the pain". Of course, this being Leverage, there is no actual hostage situation.
  • Used in the '70's TV series The Rookies. The pregnant hostage was played by Tyne Daly, who, at that time, was married to series star Georg Stanford Brown.
  • In The Dead Zone, Sarah is kidnapped during the early stages of pregnancy. This isn't revealed to the audience (or her family) until after she is rescued, though.
  • Justified: Jamie Berglund in "The Life Inside". When Raylan and Tim storm the hideout, he holds a gun to her belly and threatens to shoot.
  • Sanctuary: In season 3 the team pretends to be bank robbers and holds everyone hostage because one person is carrying an Abnormal parasite. One hostage is believed to be the host, but instead is revealed to be pregnant. Later she is the first hostage released.
  • Inforced and Envoked in Doctor Who,When Amy was taken for the exact reason that she was pregnant.
  • In an episode of Riptide (1984-1986), a young woman is kidnapped for ransom just after she learns that she's pregnant. The kidnaper is the father of her unborn child.
  • Zig-zag: The Punky Brewster episode "Ouch!" starts off dealing with the guilt Cherie feels for causing Punky to break her leg. At the hospital, Cherie is in a stalled elevator with a pregnant woman going into labor. Cherie winds up delivering the baby herself, and as the elevator car is finally repaired, she is crying hysterically over what she did and went through.

    Music 
  • "Children's Story" by Slick Rick details how the delinquent young man on the run from the law "grabbed a pregnant lady and pulled out the automatic". He lets her go unharmed, however, because he felt guilty.

    Webcomics 

    Web Originals 
  • Quebecois Web Original ''Tete a claques'' had this as the main subject of one of its sketches. Played entirely for comedy. Both the cops and the criminal assume the woman is pregnant, she's just fat. She gets offended at being called pregnant despite her numerous protests, and proceeds to slug the criminal before beating up the cops.
  • Used hilariously in ''Hostage'', Zachary Quinto, turns a hostage woman into a lifetime relationship, even through multiple pregnancies, and an affair.

    Real Life 
  • One of the assembled Spanish deputies taken as hostage at the failed 1981 coup was indeed a pregnant woman. She was also the first one to be released and able to tell what exactly was going on in the Cortes.
  • Subverted in the Air France 139 hijacking in 1976. While the terrorists had landed the plane in Libya to refuel, one of the hostages claimed she was pregnant and that she feared she would suffer a miscarriage as a result of the scorching Saharan heat. Even though she was actually lying, it paid off, and they released her.


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