Creator / Slimebeast

"If I should live until I wake, I pray the web my death to fake."
Slimebeast

Best known for his Creepypasta horror fiction, Chris Wolf AKA Slimebeast has written some of the most well-known pastas on the internet. A former game designer and actor, Slimebeast began writing short stories in 2012 for a contest held by Bogleech.com. Since then, he has written over one hundred of these tales. You can find several readings of his work on YouTube, most notibly those of Mr. CreepyPasta. His style of writing usually consists of pop culture and/or nostalgia building to a shock ending.

Although Slimebeast was part of the development team for Dragonspires, one of the first multiplayer online games, and voiced Anime as well as appearing in live action films, his best known work is that of Abandoned by Disney, Lost Episodes, and Funnymouth.

Slimebeast's work usually seems to avoid blood and gore, opting instead for unease and dread followed by a shocking reveal.

His website is http://slimebeast.com/index.php

Some of his works contain examples of:

  • Abandoned Area: Abandoned by Disney.
  • Amusement Park of Doom: Disneyland in Room Zero. people in Disney-branded gas masks hanging around, kids coming out of the water slides in the wrong order (or not for 5 minutes and finally coming out, blue with asphyxia and complaining about being squeezed), and a big spot that nobody's allowed to go into. There was a terrible accident during WWII where an entire parks worth of people were Buried Alive. An air raid siren was accidentally tripped, leading the patrons to be herded into a bomb shelter. Then a power outage caused them all to suffocate. They had all been given gas masks modelled on Disney characters. Disney "solved" the problem by pouring a couple of tons of concrete over it.
  • After the End: “Afterpeople” and the Saturday Morning Cartoon Zombionix from “Dead Serious”.
  • All There in the Manual: Confused about how "Don't Pet the Dog" ended? Slimebeat explains the twist in the comments.
  • Be Careful What You Wish For: "Funtime with Floppy" has the narrator, as a child, write a letter to the titular show (about a puppet rabbit and his adventures on a farm) asking for the other characters to leave Floppy alone and not be mean to him. The next episode that airs responds to the letter by having the other characters tear Floppy apart as he screams.
  • Buried Alive: The fate of the park patrons in Room Zero.
  • Downer Ending: "Minor Corrections" ends with the Narrator discovering that his dad hung himself... immediately after seeing a damaged photo that predicted it.
  • Driven to Suicide: It's implied that the Narrator's dad in "Minor Corrections" had this happen.
    What happened with Uncle Duke combined with my Mom's reaction must've been worse than I'd even realized.
  • Education Mama: The narrator's parents in "Safe Internet" are very strict about making sure he focuses on learning. In this case, though, it's learning to be a Mad Scientist.
  • Expository Theme Tune: The main song from “Zombionix”:
    ”Zombionix! Creepy Undead Cyborg Uglies!,”
    ”Meat and Metal are as one!”
    ”Fighting for the human race (it's no longer there),”
    ”Fighting in the human’s place (No one left to care),”
    "There is no shelter to be found (Enemy is friend),”
    "Earth is just a battle ground (War will never end),”
  • Eye Scream: Anyone watching the titular "Class Creeps" winds up doing this to themselves.
    I CAN'T WATCH THIS!
  • Foreshadowing / Rewatch Bonus: "Disappear Hole" has one bit of narration that takes a whole new meaning once you know the twist:
    "One of us should climb down there and see if there's anything cool. One of us can hold the other's hands." Tyler seemed quite pleased with his idea, but after a moment it seemed as if there would be no volunteer.
  • Humans Are the Real Monsters: "Pink Lester" seems like a story about a boy who is tortured regularly by some kind of malevolent entity named Lester (don't call him Pink Lester) who visits him at night, and that's not wrong. Lester is a young boy, and the boy he gleefully tortures is his imaginary friend.
  • I'm a Humanitarian: At the end of "Afterpeople", the protagonist of the show, who has spent the whole show searching for her father, finally finds him, already dead. However, due to a lack of edible food in the show's post-apocalyptic setting, she's so hungry and desperate that her immediate instinct upon finding the corpse is to start chowing down on it raw. The sound of her chewing scars the narrator for life.
  • Kill and Replace: In "Don't Pet the Dog", this is the reason why you don't pet the damn dog. The dog will die, and then you become the new dog.
  • Magical Camera: "Minor Corrections". Though it's not the camera itself that is magical but the mail-in photo development lab that makes "corrections" to photos to show the deceased state of anyone in them who is either already dead at the time of development or will die very soon.
  • Maybe Magic, Maybe Mundane: Is left unclear if Afterpeople is just a creepy sci-fi show about the future or something else.
  • Meta Origin: "Lost Episodes" is meant to be one for all of those, well, "Lost Episode" pastas inspired by the likes of Suicide Mouse, Dead Bart, etc. There's nothing supernatural about any of these supposedly haunted episodes. They were all made by one guy with an obsession for editing videos and probably some kind of mental illness. He did manage to eventually turn himself into a supernatural video tape that automatically edits all tapes near it, but that's it. Also, he didn't even like scary stuff, or gore, or anything like that at first. The narrator made him come around though.
  • The Most Dangerous Video Game: He's written several stories about these, such as the "Attract Mode" trilogy.
    • "123 Safety Street" from the story of the same name ends up to be a subversion. The game is a Christian Scare 'em Straight game made to teach kids that "Halloween is an amoral holiday" and all of the scary glitches and stuff were intentional. When the game appears to start affecting real life, it was just the kid's parents who were in on the whole thing, which ends up badly for the mother when she grabs the kid from behind to scare him and he fights back, knocking her over and killing her when she hits her head on a chair. Possibly ends up double subverted when the bloodstain left in the carpet is the same as the face of "Dr. Boo!" from the game.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero!: The ending to "Minor Corrections", of a sort. Despite seeing proof that a certain mail-in photo development lab can show/alter the future through damaged photographs, the Narrator sent in film of his Prom photo just to see what would happen. What did he get? The photo being messed up in such a way that it looked like his father was hanging from the ceiling.
  • No Ending: Some stories end like this, for example in "Watch for Willy", we don’t get to know what happens after the protagonist finds Willy.
  • No Fourth Wall: "New Creatures". Slimebeast managed to piss off an assortment of creatures and monsters through his writings, and (realizing that there's no escape) asks the reader to pick the one that will kill him the fastest.
  • One Myth to Explain Them All: The whole basis of "It’s Always a Zombie". Zombies are real. Every other kind of mythical or supernatural creature is not, they're all just zombies that people mistook for something else.
    Sasquatch? Turns out he was a survivalist wearing a gilly suit and face paint. He didn’t bring his orange hat, so some numb-nuts took him for a deer and pumped a few rounds into his chest. Ever since then, he stormed through the woods, groaning, munching squirrels, and scaring the shit out of campers. Well, he did until I blew his brains out.
  • Our Ghosts are Different: Gascots (a portmanteau of "Gas mask" and "mascot") from Room Zero are people wearing a Disney branded gas mask made to look like a character from one of the classic shorts. They're one of the people who were accidentally Buried Alive in the Disneyland bomb shelter.
  • Rage Quit: "FPS" is written from the perspective of an enemy monster in a First-Person Shooter, who has been killed by players countless times and watching them move on to the next level. It's overjoyed when it finally manages to kill the player for once, thinking that it gets to move on to the next level instead. Except...
    What does "WTF!!! UNINSTALL!!!" mean?
  • Ret Gone: A minor case in "Disappear Hole": once something falls into the titular hole, no one remembers it existed. For instance, the three boys in the story think of dropping a flashlight into the hole to see how deep it is, but realize they forgot to bring one. Then they spot the glow of a flashlight down the hole fading out of view, and realize they did bring one and dropped it in after all. And of course, there's the fourth boy in the story. Which is why you didn't know he was in it.
  • Sir Swears-a-Lot: The jack-o-lantern from "A Lot of Guts", and his kids.
  • Spot The Thread: A retroactive one occurs in "Don't Pet the Dog" which helps explain why you shouldn't pet the titular dog. You see, the dog the narrator meets in the story has a chunk of his left ear missing, and the story ends with a tow truck driver warning the narrator about a murderer that was supposedly loose in the area, who had a chunk of his left ear bitten off by one of his victims.
    What a bastard that murderer was... On top of everything else, he petted the dog.
  • Spoiler Title: "S'mores", as pointed out in the comments.
    Mary: The title sorta gives away the twist. :/
    Slimebeast: OR DOES IT? Spoiler! Yeah, I guess.
  • Subverted Kids Show: “Class Creeps”, “Dead Serious”, "Squiggles", and “Funtime With Floppy”.
  • Surreal Horror: The creature in “Stranger Danger” can be described as this.
  • Take Our Word for It: During "Class Creeps", the narrator Felix can't see the video being streamed (the pilot of the titular show), and has to rely on his friend's remarks in the chat to find out what's going on. This is subverted at the end of the story, where we are told what happened to Felix's friends.
  • Wham Line: "Disappear Hole" ends on one which doubles as an in-universe one. It also turns everything we've read on its head.
    Whose bike is that?
    • Near the end of "Minor Corrections", we are given a minor clue as to what happened to the Prom photo.
      I wasn't fast enough. I didn't get to the basement before...
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