Adored By The Network / Cartoon Network

Toonami and Teen Titans Go! have their own pages.

  • Scooby-Doo. This show and almost all of its multiple incarnations completely dominated the network in the late 1990s and throughout the 2000s, with the original series, The New Scooby-Doo Movies, A Pup Named Scooby-Doo and later What's New, Scooby-Doo? being the most prominent. It seemed like if a show wasn't Looney Tunes, Tom and Jerry, The Flintstones, a show on Toonami, or one of the popular Cartoon Cartoons, it was eventually bumped for more Scooby-Doo.
    • When the show inexplicably re-surged in popularity, Cartoon Network took advantage of it which resulted in marathons such as 1999's heavily advertised The Scooby Doo Project and the 2002 Saturday evening Scooby-Universe block. Several of the television and direct-to-video movies aired on Cartoon Network's Cartoon Theatre pretty often. When ever there was a "Toon Extra" playing, you could also expect an airing of The New Scooby Doo Mysteries at least 50% of the time. Lastly, special airings of Laff-A-Lympics were aired under the original blanket title of Scooby's All-Star Laff-A-Lympics..
    • It even got to the point where this became lampshaded thoughout the network, with Cartoon Cartoon Fridays occasionally poking fun at this. If these events weren't the result of Scooby actually becoming the president of Cartoon Network during the 2000 presidental campaign, this may have helped it.
    • Add a further comment to the Scooby-Doo part for Cartoon Network: for a while they would also take any moment they could to play Scooby-Doo movies at any chance they could. That and Johnny Test.
    • Boomerang, at least in the UK, held what it called a Scooby Summer sometime during the 2000's. For the entirety of the summer holidays, every waking hour in the schedule would be filled by Scooby-Doo. It might have been the longest marathon of any cartoon ever, complete with adverts making it seem like it was the viewers' fault ("you begged," they enthused, "you pleaded!"). Even today, as of 2011, Boomerang will be having a "Scooby Week" or two, using excuses such as Easter break and midterms.
    • Ever since the summer of 2016, Scooby-Doo and the Ghoul School is aired once a month as a weekday morning movie. Sometimes, Boomerang will air it as well.
  • Space Ghost was almost always very prominent in the network's history. Space Ghost, Zorak, Moltar, and especially Brak seemingly existed as the mascots for the network as a whole from the mid-90s into the early 2000s. In that time, the characters were given 4 separate shows (including reruns of the original series, 5 if one counts Moltar hosting the action block Toonami, and 6 if one counts the revival of Cartoon Planet as its own thing), 3 spinoffs, and at least 3 specials (A Space Ghost Christmas, Space Ghost's World Premier Toon-In, and Brak Presents the Brak Show Starring Brak). Space Ghost Coast to Coast was the network's original longest runner before Ed, Edd n Eddy dethroned it (and even then, a web series managed to push it a bit longer than EENE). Even when their shows were cancelled, Cartoon Network still gave them prominent roles in advertising. Toonami's return in 2012 even coincided with the return of Cartoon Planet (with Brak and Zorak returning as hosts).
    • It also helps that Coast to Coast was the show which kicked off the network's own original programming, and that many of the network's more popular blocks (Toonami, [adult swim], Cartoon Cartoon Fridays) evolved from spin-offs of that series.
  • Animaniacs was treated pretty well during its run on Cartoon Network. It ran for four years, got tons of promos (including some where the Warner siblings went into other shows on the channel) and had a few marathons, mostly during the Thanksgiving season.
  • Cartoon Network also loved playing Alvin and the Chipmunks back in the 90's and would show day-long marathons to commemorate holidays where Scooby Doo didn't seem to fit, such as Easter and President's Day.
  • Cartoon Cartoons, why else would they have their own block?
    • From 1999 to 2002, you could not go one day without seeing Dexter's Laboratory, Johnny Bravo, or The Powerpuff Girls playing on the network. All of these shows were practically the mascots of the network during that time, to the point where the network launched Cartoon Cartoon Weeknights in 2000, which aired the shows from 7:30pm to 8:30pm. In Johnny Bravo's case, it helped him earn the short-lived all-request cartoon series, JBVO. When Cartoon Network finally stopped airing runs of Looney Tunes in 2004 they were replaced by Dexter reruns.
    • Ed, Edd n Eddy is certainly worth a mention. Since its debut in January 1999 and all throughout its run, the show was well-liked by the network, always receiving good advertising. It eventually became the network's longest-running series, airing a total of 70 episodes running through 5 and 1/4 seasons and was eventually, the last Cartoon Cartoon still airing new episodes. And the best part? It was even given a Grand Finale in the form of a TV movie that wrapped up most plot threads and gave the titular characters a very happy ending. Needless to say, the series was admired and still remains a well-respected favorite amongst both viewers and the network.
    • Courage the Cowardly Dog became the new 'it' show during and after the reign of PPG and Dexter's Lab, then, even after it was cancelled, it came back sometime during the late 2000's and could be seen airing every day for a time during 2010 and early 2011, though that's since ceased. It has since returned in 2013 as part of Cartoon Network's regular programming. For some reason, ever since Courage was rerun, "The Curse of Ramses" would show more often than any other episode by a substantial margin.
    • Also, in the mid-2000s, they would show nothing but Codename: Kids Next Door back to back on Saturday mornings. Considering the series was greenlit for its pilot being the winner of the 2001 Big Pick Weekend, it's rather justified. The show would eventually replace The New Scooby-Doo Mysteries, Looney Tunes, and other classic cartoons as "Toon Extras" in early 2004.
  • The original Ben 10 used to be like this. The sequels, on the other hand, tend to only be shown a couple times a week.
    • It's a different story in the UK, as (along with Chowder and Johnny Test) Ben 10 and Ben 10: Alien Force dominate the channel. It's got to the point where the late evening 'Cartoon Cartoon' show now consists of nothing but Chowder and Ben 10: Alien Force reruns.
    • It happened in France as well during 2012, where Ben 10: Alien Force and Ben 10: Ultimate Alien were present 50% of the time.
    • An odd example with Ben 10: Omniverse, which has daily slots on Boomerang, despite still being in production on Cartoon Network proper.
  • Adventure Time. In addition to weekly marathons, it's used to round out most 15-minute blocks left over after movies.
    • Both of the Fionna and Cake episodes were heavily promoted, countdown clock and all. The CN site even changed the link with Finn's face on it to Fionna's during its premiere week! It even has its own web game and DVD now, the ads for both being commonly seen.
  • For the CN Real block, the scheduling wasn't so bad; the live-action shows mainly stayed within the block. However, they were endlessly promoted over the cartoons that made up the vast majority of the channel's airtime, and the kicker was a video featuring Andrew W.K. proudly proclaiming that Cartoon Network was more than just cartoons.
  • The Marvelous Misadventures of Flapjack was hit with this from the instant it premiered — CN started airing it multiple times per day, every day of the week, even though there was only one episode. Ironic, given that CN stopped caring halfway through the second season (of course, the overexposure might have had something to do with that).
  • The Amazing World of Gumball. Huge, huge buildup: They showed a "sneak peek" of it six days before its premiere. The day it debuted, there was a countdown bug on screen. And already it's averaging at least one rerun a day.
    • In October 2014 Gumball averaged at least 8 - 10 repeats every weekday. It, Teen Titans Go and Ben 10 (2016) are still commonly used whenever Cartoon Network seemingly needs schedule filler.
    • By 2017 it's the second most rerun show on the entire channel. Also Gumball usually tends to be the first thing that airs after [adult swim] signs off.
    • On Mother’s Day 2017, they aired an all-day marathon of this show.
  • The Looney Tunes Show seemed to be this as well, in that, like Adventure Time above, its "Merrie Melodies" segments were occasionally used to round out the minutes after other shows. Also, like Gumball, there was a countdown bug on the screen the day it premiered. Also, during the 4th of July weekend of 2011, the network aired random episodes of the show that were supposedly made up until that point, along with random airings of classic Looney Tunes shorts, Space Jam, and Looney Tunes: Back in Action in continuous loops. Back in the day, they used to have "June Bugs", a 72-hour block in June, consisting of nothing but Bugs Bunny cartoons. The final regular June Bugs marathon was in 2002 until it got a semi-revival in 2013.
    • Wabbit started to get this treatment as well, with Cartoon Network dedicating weekday afternoons to nothing but it and Uncle Grandpa.
  • Hi Hi Puffy AmiYumi got hit with this during its heyday. CN gave it major promotion, marathons, a prime time premiere slot, daily reruns, merchandising, and even a parade float for the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade in 2005 (with Puffy AmiYumi themselves performing!). By the third season, however, they stopped caring about it.
  • Captain Planet and the Planeteers was transmitted day and night. In Latin America, it was transmitted during weekends (the time of the day kids are mostly free) for four hours in a row. It's one of the reasons why such a light-hearted series could triumph during the Dark Age.
  • Small World was only aired on Sundays and Mondays at 5:00 A.M. on Cartoon Network in the United States, but the south of the border version, or in other words, Cartoon Network in Latin America, adored it, it was on every weekday at 7:00 A.M., and plus, there were even some shows that weren't on the American version of Small World, and they were even given their own individual half hour slots on the channel. For example, Franklin was on weekdays at 9:00 A.M., and weekends at 8:30 A.M.
  • Total Drama, seasonally. You won't find it in the Winter. But when Spring/Summer comes, it comes back in full force with a new season. Heck, CN was actually willing to sacrifice an hour of Johnny Test of all things for previous Total Drama seasons to prepare for the new one.
    • During the second part of the fifth season, CN showed at least one new episode a weekday, sometimes even two, hyping it as a "Summer Showdown". The same would happen to the entirety of its sixth season.
    • If you happen to be near a TV in the afternoon you can still sometimes catch reruns of the first, second or third seasons in any order.
  • The High Fructose Adventures of The Annoying Orange. Like with Gumball, there was a "sneak peek" of a Star Trek parody episode two weeks before it was to officially premiere. Said sneak peek episode went on to be rerun once a day for at least a week. Countdown bugs on the screen for the whole day of both the sneak peek and the actual premiere.
  • Johnny Test managed to cross this trope with Americans Hate Tingle. Hated by many, the series managed to last for 9 years with 6 seasons and retain heavy advertising despite having a very loud hatedom begging for its cancellation. Before the show officially ended in its native Canada, their cries seemed to go unheard - even if the bare minimum of people are watching it, they still make a profit! Since the show ended though, CN would only air it for one hour early in the morning in May, get rid of its slot on weekdays in June and July, and remove it completely by September. CN then brought it back for a nearly all day Christmas Day marathon that year, presumably to burn off the last remaining episodes.
  • Ninjago seems to have become this, mainly due to the success of its accompanying toyline. It died down by February 2015; as of then Ninjago only reruns in some weekends in every two months, and episodes often premiere exclusively on the CN website.
  • Boomerang examples:
  • For CN Asia viewers, it's Tom and Jerry or The Pink Panther. The entire afternoon is nothing but episodes of both, and all CN Originals (with the exception of Network Darlings Ben 10, Chowder and The Marvelous Misadventures of Flapjack) are scheduled after midnight; i.e. way past the bedtime of their target audience.
    • Say what you will, but Ben 10 was this on CN Asia between 2008 to 2012. You know it's really adored when Ben 10 related shows are airing almost 10 times a day, and new shows all premiere on it's sister channel Boomerang Asia instead, and new episodes airing between Tom and Jerry and Pink Panther reruns as well as Oggy and the Cockroaches (the only other show it adores- despite said show also airing on Disney, and now, even Nickelodeon). Word has it that one Malaysian entertainment company got the rights to the live show for the South East Asia region, and CN was spamming Ben 10 to drum up interest for the event as per their part of the agreement.
    • As of this writing, CN Asia really adores Oggy and the Cockroaches. It's a major facepalm because Oggy is also airing on Disney Asia and Nickelodeon Asia, and on various country-specific terrestrial networks in the region like NTV 7 in Malaysia and TCS Okto in Singapore.
  • [adult swim] at one point began airing Squidbillies every weeknight at midnight while airing commercials stating it was getting low ratings and berating the viewers for not watching this awesome show.
    • Adult Swim absolutely loves Fox reruns, specifically King of the Hill and any show made by Seth MacFarlane. Weekdays are King of the Hill, American Dad, and Family Guy for 6 of its 9 hours (including repeats). In one week, there is going to be 14 hours of King of the Hill, 12.5 hours of Family Guy, and 10 hours of American Dad for a total of 36.5 hours.
    • Adult Swim lost the rights to air Futurama at the end of 2007. In the days leading up to New Year's Day 2008, they showed every episode in existence at that point in a row to give it a proper sendoff.
    • Futurama would later be the network favorite for Comedy Central when they renewed the series. Not only did it get at least one airing every weekday at 1:30 (Along with the regular airing at 9:00 PM before South Park), but it also got another 26 episode renewal bringing the show's run up to 2013 along with promotion and a nice 10:00 PM slot.
    • Adult Swim has also been playing The Oblongs pretty regularly, off and on, since 2002, sometimes even 4 or 5 days a week, despite the show only having 13 episodes.
    • Robot Chicken has consistently aired two eps a night at midnight on Adult Swim's weeknight block (excluding Thursdays) since at least 2010, and at one point was used as the lead-in to the entire Sunday night block. This status was eventually lampshaded by having AS execs Keith Crofford and Mike Lazzo appear in the 100th episode to fight the Robot Chicken during his rampage through the castle, only to be easily killed. Crofford's last words:
    The ratings we'll get for this will be huge...
    • Adult Swim appears to be going all-in on Rick and Morty. As of May 10th, 2014, they show only one episode per week (on Sunday nights), but they show it twice per rotation, at 9 PM and Midnight. When combined with the repeat run, this means that the same episode of the show airs four times on the same day. Of course, given the quality of the show, and the fact that, because of this, it's very easy to actually watch, very few people seem to be complaining about it.
    • Adult Swim loves airing the "Viewer Mail" episodes of Family Guy at least once per week, and they will occasionally air both episodes in the same week. They also seem to air "Brian In Love" at least three times a month.
  • Dragons: Riders of Berk, like other shows introduced to the network since 2010, got the sneak-peak hour-long episode which was then re-aired every day for a week, the countdown bug on the screen for the actual premiere, and, again, the currently most-recent episode is re-aired at least once every day for a week until the next episode premieres, to the point that it briefly took over Cartoon Planet's timeslot to air rerunsnote . The show eventually took over DC Nation's timeslot for reruns on Saturdays, with Johnny Test on Sundays, while the actual block was on hiatus, and the network of course didn't tell any of the creators about this. All this before it took a Channel Hop to Netflix.
  • Almost Naked Animals:
    • The show premiered on June 13, 2011 along with Sidekick. Unlike the latter show which was removed in October 2011, Cartoon Network kept the show airing reruns even after season one ended. It got even better treatment in 2012, when the show started airing on weekends and airing a marathon every weekend on Boomerang. Eventually after ratings got low it was removed after season three finished airing, but continued to air every weekend on Boomerang.
    • The show was so beloved by Cartoon Network that when Foster's Home for Imaginary Friends and Camp Lazlo were removed from the block, Almost Naked Animals replaced both of them.
  • During the holidays, and by virtue their annual Christmas In July programming event, you could rarely turn on Cartoon Network without seeing Grandma Got Run Over by a Reindeer. As mentioned on its Trivia page, it would air so much that if one hears the titular theme again, they'd scream. During the 2015 Christmas season, similar to the Total Drama Island example above, they'd even be willing to sacrifice an hour of Teen Titans Go for surprise airings of the special.
    • As part of Cartoon Network's partnership with Kids' WB!, they frequently aired the special on the block during the holidays. It got to the point where in 2004, half of December 2004's programming was comprised of nothing but airings of Grandma Got Run Over By A Reindeer, alongside other holiday specials.
    • Olive the Other Reindeer'’ also was subject to "surprise airings" on the schedule also in 2015, but less frequently than Grandma''.
  • They had some sort of odd fixation to airing Tom and Jerry: The Magic Ring on most weekends for nearly a decade since 2005.
  • Foster's Home for Imaginary Friends, The Grim Adventures of Billy & Mandy, Codename: Kids Next Door, Camp Lazlo, and My Gym Partner's a Monkey were Cartoon Network's flagship shows during the mid-2000s by the time the network was entering its Dork Age. Reruns were shown almost all the time and they also got several marathons. Foster's was popular enough to have lots of merchandise, and like AmiYumi listed above, got a Macy's Parade float for three years (though the last appearance of the float was Overshadowed by Awesome).
  • Incredible Crew. For every three minute commercial block (especially on the sister channel, Boomerang), you could expect at least two ads for that show. It didn't go over well.
  • With Cartoon Network's flicks, Diary of a Wimpy Kid has been aired a lot, almost once every four or five weeks.
  • Prior to its premiere, Cartoon Network was seriously hyping up Uncle Grandpa as is pretty typical for first-run shows. On its premiere, forty-five minutes after the pilot episode, Cartoon Network even showed the pilot again, replacing The Annoying Orange's timeslot.
  • The UK channel loved airing nothing but The Fruitties and Blinky Bill on weekday mornings until noon from the mid 90's to the mid 2000's.
    • Sometimes, this block would be followed by an hour of Fish Police.
  • There was a time (years 2003-2009) when the UK feed of Cartoon Network almost every day between 2:00 a.m. and 5:00 a.m. of UK time aired nothing but Gadget Boy & Heather.
  • Since the first special arrived in 2004, Scary Godmother and its sequel special The Revenge of Jimmy are routinely aired on Cartoon Network every October. If Halloween is coming up CN can and will air both specials, though to a modest degree compared to certain other shows on the schedule. It helps that both specials are pretty entertaining, with voice actors from The Ocean Group.
  • The movie School of Rock was adored by Cartoon Network in the mid-2000's. It aired at least once or more a month. Became Hilarious in Hindsight when a regular series based on the movie was announced for Nickelodeon, a rival network, in 2015.
  • The BENELUX version of CN had (and maybe still has) a special block on Sundays (that airs every Sunday, not only once a month) called 60. It is a block during which content of one single show would be shown for 5 hours straight (from 8 am to 1 pm), with no pauses in between. As you could guess it became the go to place to see anything that was ever adored by the network. A few shows on that block were Codename: Kids Next Door (which was the most common show to be featured on that block) and George of the Jungle. An extra mention could go to a certain commercial short for the block (in which they said that you could watch 60 instead of doing really boring activities) that has been used from 2008 to 2011 and aired during every single day of that show. They loved it so much that the next short used shots of it.
    • CN Poland also had this 60 block in years 2001-2008.
    • CN Europe had this until 2010. The last incarnation was known as Cartoon Toon Toon and the only show it had was the George of the Jungle remake, and the block was dropped after a month due to lack of interest.
  • The Amazing World of Gumball was especially subject to this in late 2014-early 2015, to the point that, on January 19 of the latter year, reruns of Steven Universe ceased airing on all days but Thursday and Saturday to make room for more Gumball, along with Adventure Time and Regular Show in favor of more Teen Titans Go and Clarence. Though many Steven fans feared that the show was about to become a victim of network screwing, by February 2, Steven would be airing reruns just as often. However, CN was still determined to squeeze one more episode of Gumball in for no apparent reason, so that meant the final Gumball rerun of the day got Adventure Time's 7:00 PM slot, moving AT to 7:30 and Regular Show to 7:45 (the only time they aired during the day).
  • With the 2015 rebrand of Boomerang in America, The Garfield Show seems to have fallen into this category, airing eight times a day, more than any other show!
  • We Bare Bears (like TTG) had promos air on NBC and other non-Turner networks, though this depended on your cable or satellite provider as well.
  • Cartoon Network Japan is not extempt from this:
    • In 2015, the most played shows were The Powerpuff Girls, Thomas the Tank Engine, Adventure Time and Beware the Batman.
    • In the early 2000's, the channel loved Animaniacs, Toonsylvania and Garfield and Friends, but as very few episodes had been dubbed in the language (and in the case of Garfield, had all Orson's Farm segments omitted), this was a major problem, as the shows would cycle through all their episodes once a week.
    • As of January 2017, this seems to be averted, as each show has a fair balance, with the only shows repeating more than three times a day being Hanakappa note  and Beware The Batman.
  • Back in the mid to late 2000's, they loved airing Teen Titans: Trouble in Tokyo and both of the Foster's Home for Imaginary Friends movies on random weekdays and weekends. Similar to the SpongeBob movie example on the Nickelodeon page, these movies were used as filler for timeslots that couldn't fit more episodes of these shows.
  • Around November 2015, they loved airing Free Birds every single weekend, even when it was nowhere near Thanksgiving (when the movie takes place).
    • Speaking of Thanksgiving, the channel also tends to air Thanksgiving-themed episodes of their programming quite frequently as well, such as "Black Friday", an episode of Teen Titans Go! (this also applies to the UK feed). The other Thanskgiving themed-episode of the show also suffered the same problem prior to the creation of "Black Friday", as it was paired with one of the show's most popular segments and guest-starred one of the world's most popular superheroes.
  • Supernoobs had somewhat fallen into this in the US. It aired for two and a half hours each day, and got a four-hour marathon on New Year's Eve. Though this could be a response to the cancellation of Johnny Test, as it was made by the same people behind said show.
  • Cartoon Network Canada loves Clarence, Steven Universe and The Day My Butt Went Psycho, which is odd, considering that most Canadian children's channels adore shows that fulfill Canadian content quotas - Psycho is the only show listed that fills CanCon quota, and weirdly enough it's the one that airs the least. (This could be due to Cartoon Network Canada's status as a Category B service, which has less CanCon requirements as a Category A service like Teletoon or YTV, but don't get guarantee of full-coverage of any large distributor in return.note )
  • Baby Looney Tunes had been a staple of Cartoon Network's morning schedule ever since its premiere, to the point where Cartoon Network still aired it long after it stopped making new episodes.
  • Around mid-2016, the U.S. Cartoon Network showed three hours of Steven Universe each day. Typically, these marathons had some sort of theme to them, and each had its own title: "Fusions", "Attack from Homeworld", "Stevonnie Forever", etc.note 
    • They sometimes tend to have all-day marathons of the show when they don't feel like showing a Teen Titans Go! marathon. For example, on January 29, 2017, Steven ran all day to lure in Freeform viewers not interested in The 700 Club telethon.
  • During the early 2010's, Planet 51 was shown regularly on Cartoon Network for seemingly no reason at very random times of the day - that is, until the movie's broadcast rights went to Nickelodeon sometime around 2014.
  • During late 2016, one couldn't turn on Cartoon Network every weekend without seeing either The Cat in the Hat or Alvin and the Chipmunks as the movie of the day. It got to the point where these two movies were played over and over for 12 hours on Thanksgiving Day.
    • The movies, not unlike Teen Titans Go!, could suddenly pop up on a weekend, such as when they replaced a planned Steven Universe marathon during one weekend. To add insult to injury, Steven Universe was still listed on digital guides at the same time Alvin was being aired.
  • Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs was, before its removal in May 2017, Cartoon Network's second favorite show, running for at least three hours on the average weekday. On the weekend of the NBA Cup, there was a all-weekend marathon of the show.
    • Currently, they adore the movie, too. If there's a movie showing on the channel on a particular day, there's about a 60% chance it's gonna be Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs.
    • Ben 10 (2016) is the channel's 3rd favorite show, taking up a good chunk of the airtime like Cloudy and Titans.
  • As of May 2017, the UK feed loves Regular Show and The Amazing World of Gumball. On the same week as Teen Titans Go!'s absolute epitome of network adoration on the US feed, Gumball even aired more than twice as much as Titans on the UK feed!

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