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Video Game / See No Evil

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See No Evil is a 2014 puzzle game, developed by Gabriel Priske and his team in Game Maker engine. It is set in a world where the majority of humans have chosen to abandon sight and live with their eyes always covered to hide themselves from the evils of the world. People who refuse that and still choose to see are known as Seers, and are persecuted by the society.

The game begins when a dead Seer falls through the roof of our protagonist’s house. The noise startles him and forces him to take the veil off. He finds that the dead person has apparently being killed for refusing to cover his eyes, and takes this as a signal to flee, picking up the Seer’s journal for guidance. Many challenges follow in his quest to escape this world, past the many patrols used to such escape attempts.

The game can be bought here.

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This game provides examples of the following tropes:

  • Apocalyptic Log: There’s a version of that with the dead Seer’s journal. Extracts from it are read between levels to paint the picture of what society has become.
  • Crate Expectations: Wooden crates appear early on, and pushing them in order to solve puzzles or block off enemies an important part of gameplay.
  • Creative Sterility: One of the consequences of most people being willfully blind is that they can no longer draw or paint anything, design advanced architecture and the like. Technological progress has also stalled, inventors unable to work in this kind of a society.
  • Disability Superpower: Played with, given that the disability (wilful blindness) is entirely intentional. Some of the wilfully blind enemies have developed an echolocation skill to navigate (and search for the player) instead of using their sight.
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  • Fog of War: Some levels have a version of that with a black fog that covers the majority of the level. Sections of it can be removed with loud sound, and the entire fog will dissipate if you touch a statue with glow-bugs who’ll then remove it for you.
  • Justified Tutorial: All that the game does is details the controls in menu. Then, the early levels are structured so that the player will naturally come in contact with game's mechanics without them ever being explicitly explained.
  • One-Hit-Point Wonder: If one of the enemies catches the player, it’s curtains for them.
  • Patrolling Mook: The various patrolling guards. Some can only detect the player if they walk too close and they hear their footsteps, while others have developed the ability to echolocate. Finally, walking into patches of garbage will make player character smelly enough for them to notice you, and even follow the dirty footsteps left behind. This will last until you manage to wash it off in water.
  • Sequence Breaking: Some levels can be completed in an alternative manner that doesn’t use all of the intended objects.
  • Story Breadcrumbs: You only gains bits and pieces of how this world came to be through the journal’s extracts and the voice of the Narrator.

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