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Headscratchers / King's Quest (2015)

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  • Am I missing something? Why are Manny and Mordon considered brothers if Manny is a goblin while Mordon is a human? Since it's implied they were switched at birth, they also have different adoptive parents.
    • I was confused about this at first, but on my second playthrough, I interpreted it as them choosing to call each other brothers since they share the same parents, in a sense: Manny's birth parents are Mordon's adoptive parents, and Mordon's birth parents are Manny's adoptive parents.
      • Them choosing to consider each other as brothers due to sharing parents in a sense really does seem to be the case. Based on dialogue though, it seems like only the human parents are the ones they see as a link. Manny mentions they forced him to hide his true identity all his life, while Mordon considers such a fate better than being forgotten by them. The so-called goblin parents they supposedly share, on the other hand, don't seem to be even a thing as of Chapter 3. Either goblin society doesn't have a concept of close family, meaning that they raise their young (including ones they've stolen) in a sort of communal effort, or Manny's biological goblin parents were so cruel to Mordon that the latter doesn't even consider them as parents of any sort. It could also possibly be a combination of the two aforementioned scenarios.
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  • How did Amaya end up with the missing hand from Agatha's clock? And how did she know to give it to Whisper to give to Graham?

  • Why is turning Manny back into a cat instead of burning him with a fireball a better solution? Since Manny told the family that he has friends with magic that could help him as a cat and as a cat, he can still communicate, being a cat wouldn't be much of a hindrance to Manny. Turning him into a cat would be a temporary setback since he would be able to plot against the royal family in the future.
    • Continuity is likely the main reason. In the original games, Manannan was turned into a cat and remained in his feline state for the rest of the series. It seems like the creators want to hit the same notes that the original Manannan plot did in the earlier games while also elevating Manannan into becoming the Big Bad of this series. They wanted Manannan to return in some way to orchestrate the plot for Chapter 4, but they also had to work in a way to revert him back to his cat-form by the end of the chapter to maintain continuity (and to also ensure he could return for the last chapter). In a way, the ending Chapter 4 suffers a bit by being Hijacked by Ganon.
      • Manny was prepared for the fireball and it probably wouldn't be enough to beat him. He wasn't prepared for the cookie.
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  • Am I the only one who feels like the dragon was supposed to show up again in Chapter 5? In the early chapters, they allude to the dragon a lot, and there's the whole thing with the "How to Tame your Dragon Book". Chapter 5 has a decent amount of Daventry catch fire with no reason given. And yet, the dragon never shows up again. Or was this supposed to be a reference to the events of KQ3 (which happens during the span of Chapter 4), where Alexander has to kill a dragon before he reaches home?

  • Just why was it so important that Graham make Gwen his heir instead of Gart? It seems to me like Gart is the more logical choice. For one thing, regardless of gender, he's Graham's oldest grandchild. Moreover, he was born in Daventry, raised in Daventry, familiar with the country and its customs. He also, by Graham's own admission, has been training to be king from a very early age, and while yeah, he's a bit of an obnoxious twit, he's a teenager - that's not exactly unusual and he could certainly be expected to grow out of it. Gwen, on the other hand, hails from the Green Isles and has spent less time in the kingdom, and the only real reason I can see is that she was more willing to listen to Graham's stories. It just seems like a weird sort of favoritism. Could it have anything to do with the fact that she's Alexander's daughter, and Graham seems like he was way more invested in his son than in Rosella? (Granted, the son was kidnapped, but even in the scene where the twins were babies, Graham's lullaby was all about Alexander.)
    • If I could add some WMG into this, I think it's because Gwen is willing to listen to his stories. Not because of some weird favoritism, but because she's willing to learn from them. Like Graham said himself in chapter 2: Rubble without a cause, he was there to not only continue the old king's legacy, but chart a new one of his own. Perhaps he believed Gart would only be able to do half of that.
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    • Okay, but carrying on from that, why did Graham pass over both of his children in order to leave the crown to Gwendolyn? It could be argued that Alexander is already the Prince Consort of Green Isles, but hi, Rosella's right there - and has been the entire time. Graham tells Gwen that he never named Rosella his heir because "she was always off adventuring with Edgar," but she doesn't seem to be doing that anymore so what's the excuse now?

  • A follow up to this question. If Gwen is now the ruler of Daventry, then who will inherit the Kingdom of the Green Isles?
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