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Please note that this list only include SSTO (Single Stage to Orbit) or to sub-orbit to qualify.[[note]]Mid-air refueling or drop tanks may or may not count.[[/note]] Nobody's built one, as of 2017. The most promising design so far is the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skylon_(spacecraft) Skylon,]] a British-designed European project, which recently cleared a key hurdle in engine development. Therefore, do not include the following:

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Please note that this list only include SSTO (Single Stage to Orbit) or to sub-orbit to qualify.[[note]]Mid-air refueling or drop tanks may or may not count.[[/note]] Nobody's built one, as of 2017.2021. The most promising design so far is the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skylon_(spacecraft) Skylon,]] a British-designed European project, which recently cleared a key hurdle in engine development. Therefore, do not include the following:following are ''not'' space planes by the definition used here:

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* In ''Manga/MoonlightMile'', there is a single-stage to orbit spaceplane [[spoiler:secretly developed by the US military called the X-68 Nightmare, which is used for transport to their clandestine space station from Area51]].


Please note that this list only include SSTO (Single Stage to Orbit) or to sub-orbit to qualify.[[note]]Mid-air refueling or drop tanks may or may not count.[[/note]] Nobody's built one, as of 2017. The most promising design so far is the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skylon_(spacecraft) Skylon]], a British-designed European project, which recently cleared a key hurdle in engine development. Therefore, do not include the following:
* The Space Shuttle, which required two boosters, a launch pad and a huge fuel tank to get into orbit. It was also incapable of any real powered flight, having to glide back to Earth. It pretty much defined the term 'FlyingBrick'.

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Please note that this list only include SSTO (Single Stage to Orbit) or to sub-orbit to qualify.[[note]]Mid-air refueling or drop tanks may or may not count.[[/note]] Nobody's built one, as of 2017. The most promising design so far is the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skylon_(spacecraft) Skylon]], Skylon,]] a British-designed European project, which recently cleared a key hurdle in engine development. Therefore, do not include the following:
* The Space Shuttle, which required two boosters, a launch pad and a huge fuel tank to get into orbit. It was also incapable of any real powered flight, having to glide back to Earth. It pretty much defined the term 'FlyingBrick'."FlyingBrick."


* The Black Stallions from the novel of Creator/DaleBrown. They can go to orbit, as the first usage of one in ''Strike Force'' shows, but sub-orbital is enough most of the time.

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* The Black Stallions from the novel of Creator/DaleBrown. They can go to orbit, orbit under their own power, as the first usage of one in ''Strike Force'' shows, but sub-orbital is enough most of the time.


* The Hypersoar was a commercial airliner project that would fly to the edge of space and skip across the atmosphere, making it extremely fast and thrifty with fuel while avoiding the Concorde's noise problems. It was quickly shelved when it was realized the skipping effect couldn't be done effectively without [[NauseaFuel repeated +1G/-1G shifts in acceleration.]]

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* The Hypersoar [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DARPA_Falcon_Project#HyperSoar Hypersoar]] was a commercial airliner project that would fly to the edge of space and skip across the atmosphere, making it extremely fast and thrifty with fuel while avoiding the Concorde's noise problems. It was quickly shelved when it was realized the skipping effect couldn't be done effectively without [[NauseaFuel repeated +1G/-1G shifts in acceleration.]]


* ''Series/{{Stargate}}'''s Goa'uld gliders, human X-302s, and Wraith darts can fly in space and in atmosphere.

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* ''Series/{{Stargate}}'''s ''Franchise/{{Stargate}}'''s Goa'uld gliders, human X-302s, and Wraith darts can fly in space and in atmosphere.


* The [[http://memory-alpha.org/en/wiki/Shuttlecraft various shuttlecraft]] of ''Franchise/StarTrek''; [[http://memory-alpha.org/en/wiki/Class_F_shuttlecraft the original shuttle]] met the single-stage to orbit, rocket[[note]]well, maybe; its claimed motive power ... ion engines ... in reality cannot be used as launch engines due to low specific impulse and not working except in vacuum[[/note]] rather than antigravity power, and aerodynamic shape requirements. (The original concept was even more aerodynamic, but the curved hull would have been too expensive to fabricate on the show's budget, resulting in the blockier, more "van-like" shape actually used in the series).



* In the ''Franchise/StarTrek'' universe, shuttlecrafts are able to go from the CoolShip in orbit and land on the PlanetOfHats, and make the trip back, with no outside help when it comes to propulsion. We don't see it often, but they are even [[CasualInterstellarTravel warp-capable]]. The starships themselves tend to spend their entire operational lives in space, but at least the USS ''[[Series/StarTrekVoyager Voyager]]'' can land and take off again without any outside help, though it takes a lot of preparation to do that -- the city-in-space starships really aren't meant for that. (''Voyager'' is sleeker and smaller by that standard; trying it with any version of the ''Enterprise'' never comes up.)

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* In the ''Franchise/StarTrek'' universe, shuttlecrafts are able to go from the CoolShip in orbit and land on the PlanetOfHats, and make the trip back, with no outside help when it comes to propulsion. We don't see it often, but they are even [[CasualInterstellarTravel warp-capable]]. The starships themselves tend to spend their entire operational lives in space, but at least the USS ''[[Series/StarTrekVoyager Voyager]]'' can land and take off again without any outside help, though it takes a lot of preparation to do that -- the city-in-space starships really aren't meant for that. (''Voyager'' is sleeker and smaller by that standard; trying it with any version of the ''Enterprise'' never comes up.)) [[http://memory-alpha.org/en/wiki/Class_F_shuttlecraft The original shuttle]] met the single-stage to orbit, rocket[[note]]well, maybe; its claimed motive power -- ion engines -- in reality cannot be used as launch engines due to low specific impulse and not working except in vacuum[[/note]] rather than antigravity power, and aerodynamic shape requirements. (The original concept was even more aerodynamic, but the curved hull would have been too expensive to fabricate on the show's budget, resulting in the blockier, more "van-like" shape actually used in the series).


** [[http://www.dougsorbiterpage.com The XR series.]] ([=XR1=] is a just a more sophisticated Delta-glider)

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** [[http://www.dougsorbiterpage.com [[https://www.alteaaerospace.com/ The XR series.]] ([=XR1=] is a just a more sophisticated Delta-glider)


Please note that this list only include SSTO (Single Stage to Orbit) or to sub-orbit to qualify.[[note]]Mid-air refueling or drop tanks may or may not count.[[/note]] Nobody's built one, as of 2017. The most promising design so far is the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reaction_Engines_Skylon Reaction Engines Skylon,]] a British-designed European project, which recently cleared a key hurdle in engine development. Therefore, do not include the following:

to:

Please note that this list only include SSTO (Single Stage to Orbit) or to sub-orbit to qualify.[[note]]Mid-air refueling or drop tanks may or may not count.[[/note]] Nobody's built one, as of 2017. The most promising design so far is the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reaction_Engines_Skylon Reaction Engines Skylon,]] org/wiki/Skylon_(spacecraft) Skylon]], a British-designed European project, which recently cleared a key hurdle in engine development. Therefore, do not include the following:


** ''ComicBook/WonderWoman1942}}'': Diana's invisible "robot plane" (called the invisible plane or invisible jet by later writers) was originally a space worthy craft which she used to [[CasualInterplanetaryTravel visit other planets in the solar system]].

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** ''ComicBook/WonderWoman1942}}'': ''ComicBook/{{Wonder Woman|1942}}'': Diana's invisible "robot plane" (called the invisible plane or invisible jet by later writers) was originally a space worthy craft which she used to [[CasualInterplanetaryTravel visit other planets in the solar system]].


* In the later Golden Age Franchise/WonderWoman comics the Amazons of Paradise Island had a small space worthy fleet which took off like airplanes and looked like airplanes which somewhat resembled swans.

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* ''Franchise/WonderWoman'':
** ''ComicBook/WonderWoman1942}}'': Diana's invisible "robot plane" (called the invisible plane or invisible jet by later writers) was originally a space worthy craft which she used to [[CasualInterplanetaryTravel visit other planets in the solar system]].
**
In the later Golden Age Franchise/WonderWoman comics the Amazons of Paradise Island had a small space worthy fleet which took off like airplanes and looked like airplanes which somewhat resembled swans.


* Justified in ''Disney/LiloAndStitch'' where Jumba's spaceship is actually based on the very passenger jet he, Pleakley, Nani, and Stitch were going to steal and use it to rescue Lilo from Gantu, which was changed due to the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

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* Justified in ''Disney/LiloAndStitch'' ''WesternAnimation/LiloAndStitch'' where Jumba's spaceship is actually based on the very passenger jet he, Pleakley, Nani, and Stitch were going to steal and use it to rescue Lilo from Gantu, which was changed due to the 9/11 terrorist attacks.


* The ''Kite'' from ''Discworld/TheLastHero'' may or may not count. It uses an external booster to initially achieve orbital velocity (though not to "take off" ... this being [[FlatWorld the Discworld]], it accomplishes that by just ''falling off the edge''), but after discarding the booster, subsequently lands [[spoiler: on Discworld's moon]] and then takes off again before landing back on the Disc. The ''Kite'' is at least the ''second'' vessel to fall off the edge and then return to the Disc, but while the first definitely passed the "no booster" requirement, as a sailing ship it rather failed the "plane" part, and calling its return "landing" is an overgenerous use of the term.

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* The ''Kite'' from ''Discworld/TheLastHero'' ''Literature/TheLastHero'' may or may not count. It uses an external booster to initially achieve orbital velocity (though not to "take off" ... this being [[FlatWorld the Discworld]], it accomplishes that by just ''falling off the edge''), but after discarding the booster, subsequently lands [[spoiler: on Discworld's moon]] and then takes off again before landing back on the Disc. The ''Kite'' is at least the ''second'' vessel to fall off the edge and then return to the Disc, but while the first definitely passed the "no booster" requirement, as a sailing ship it rather failed the "plane" part, and calling its return "landing" is an overgenerous use of the term.





* As mentioned in the "{{Literature}}" section, most ''StarWars'' space-capable vehicles smaller than about 200 meters are able to land on planets, but this is due to repulsorlift engines rather than conventional aircraft design. The shape of Naboo [[http://www.iaw.on.ca/~btaylor1/NabooN1fighter.html space fighters]] and [[http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/H-type_Nubian_yacht space yachts,]] however, appear very similar to jet aircraft.

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* As mentioned in the "{{Literature}}" section, most ''StarWars'' Most ''Franchise/StarWars'' space-capable vehicles smaller than about 200 meters are able to land on planets, but this is due to repulsorlift engines rather than conventional aircraft design. The shape of Naboo [[http://www.iaw.on.ca/~btaylor1/NabooN1fighter.html space fighters]] and [[http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/H-type_Nubian_yacht space yachts,]] however, appear very similar to jet aircraft.



* The titular ''Starlight One'' hypersonic sub-orbital passenger liner in the 1983 disaster MadeForTV Movie of the same name, based on experimental NASA spaceplane technology. The "disaster" stuff happens when space debris damages it heat shielding and thruster controls, leaving it stranded in orbit.

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* The titular ''Starlight One'' eponymous ''Film/StarlightOne'' hypersonic sub-orbital passenger liner in the 1983 disaster MadeForTV Movie of the same name, based on experimental NASA spaceplane technology. The "disaster" stuff happens when space debris damages it heat shielding and thruster controls, leaving it stranded in orbit.



* [[Literature/XWingSeries X-Wings and Y-Wings]] don't typically count; they have repulsorlift coils and use them. But ''Starfighters of Adumar'' has a pilot recount the case of another pilot whose craft had been shot up so the repulsorlifts had stopped working, and who had instead approached the cleared landing zone on the local moonbase, dropping his skids as he got close. Wes can tell the story.

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* [[Literature/XWingSeries X-Wings and Y-Wings]] Y-Wings in ''Literature/XWingSeries'' don't typically count; they have repulsorlift coils and use them. But ''Starfighters of Adumar'' has a pilot recount the case of another pilot whose craft had been shot up so the repulsorlifts had stopped working, and who had instead approached the cleared landing zone on the local moonbase, dropping his skids as he got close. Wes can tell the story.



* The ''Kite'' from ''Discworld/TheLastHero'' may or may not count. It uses an external booster to initially achieve orbital velocity (though not to "take off" ... this being the Discworld, it accomplishes that by just ''falling off the edge''), but after discarding the booster, subsequently lands [[spoiler: on Discworld's moon]] and then takes off again before landing back on the Disc. The ''Kite'' is at least the ''second'' vessel to fall off the edge and then return to the Disc, but while the first definitely passed the "no booster" requirement, as a sailing ship it rather failed the "plane" part, and calling its return "landing" is an overgenerous use of the term.

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* The ''Kite'' from ''Discworld/TheLastHero'' may or may not count. It uses an external booster to initially achieve orbital velocity (though not to "take off" ... this being [[FlatWorld the Discworld, Discworld]], it accomplishes that by just ''falling off the edge''), but after discarding the booster, subsequently lands [[spoiler: on Discworld's moon]] and then takes off again before landing back on the Disc. The ''Kite'' is at least the ''second'' vessel to fall off the edge and then return to the Disc, but while the first definitely passed the "no booster" requirement, as a sailing ship it rather failed the "plane" part, and calling its return "landing" is an overgenerous use of the term.



* ''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|2003}}'''s Colonial Vipers and Cylon Raiders could fly and fight both in an atmosphere and in a vacuum.

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* ''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|2003}}'''s ''Series/BattlestarGalactica2003'''s Colonial Vipers and Cylon Raiders could fly and fight both in an atmosphere and in a vacuum.



** We do actually see Mk VII Vipers being towed around an airbase in the new ''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|2003}}'', in a flashback set just after the death of Zack Adama. That sequence, plus some close-ups in ''Galactica'''s hangar deck seem to indicate that the skids have some retractable(?) wheels which could be used for a conventional runway take-off and landing. The Raptor, however, would probably count as a single-stage VTOL spaceplane.
* Stargate's Goa'uld gliders, human X-302s, and Wraith darts can fly in space and in atmosphere.

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** We do actually see Mk VII Vipers are shown being towed around an airbase in the new ''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|2003}}'', in a flashback set just after the death of Zack Adama. That sequence, plus some close-ups in ''Galactica'''s hangar deck seem to indicate that the skids have some retractable(?) wheels which could be used for a conventional runway take-off and landing. The Raptor, however, would probably count as a single-stage VTOL spaceplane.
* Stargate's ''Series/{{Stargate}}'''s Goa'uld gliders, human X-302s, and Wraith darts can fly in space and in atmosphere.



* Your spaceship in ''VideoGame/{{Rodina}}'' is a 100-metre long gunship that can fly in atmosphere as well as in space.



[[folder:Real Life]] (None of these have really [[IncrediblyLamePun gotten off the ground]]... yet.)

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[[folder:Real Life]] (None of these have really [[IncrediblyLamePun gotten off the ground]]...ground... yet.)



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* The ''Manga/SailorMoon'' manga features one in its version of the "Lover of Princess Kaguya" story. Said plane seems identical to the Space Shuttle (through the size is unclear) but is far more capable, being able to take off with five people, the supplies to reach the Moon and back, the tools necessary for their specific mission, and a large ''nuclear weapon'' (though this one was expected to be used shortly after reaching orbit) with no external booster, only a ramp to better reach vertical position.

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