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* BaitAndSwitch: The first half of the novel plays like a straight detective thriller, but then the story drops hints that Olivia Trelawney might be literally haunted by two of the victims of Brady's massacre, a mother and her baby; a plot idea certainly not out of step with King's usual faire. As it turns out, [[spoiler:she is not being haunted; Brady has hacked her computer to play specific sound files to make her feel like she's being haunted, all part of his plan to drive her to suicide.]]


A miniseries adaptation, starring Creator/BrendanGleeson and Creator/HarryTreadaway as detective and killer respectively, premiered on AT&T's Audience Network on August 9, 2017. It's now airing the second season.

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A miniseries adaptation, starring Creator/BrendanGleeson and Creator/HarryTreadaway as detective and killer respectively, premiered on AT&T's Audience Network on August 9, 2017. It's now airing due for a third season as of this writing, which will reportedly finally adapt the second season.
previously-skipped ''Finders Keepers''.


A miniseries adaptation, starring Creator/BrendanGleeson and Creator/HarryTreadaway as detective and killer respectively, premiered on AT&T's Audience Network on August 9, 2017.

to:

A miniseries adaptation, starring Creator/BrendanGleeson and Creator/HarryTreadaway as detective and killer respectively, premiered on AT&T's Audience Network on August 9, 2017.
2017. It's now airing the second season.


* NeverMyFault: Brady blames his actions on the universe, because if it was truly a good world with a good God and all, he surely wouldn't have done those horrible things. More specifically, [[spoiler: when [[ItMakesSenseInContext Brady's attempt to poison some hamburger to kill a dog instead kills his mother, hamburger and poison he specifically bought to bring pain to his current nemesis]].]] Brady blamed Detective Hodges.

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* NeverMyFault: Brady blames his actions on the universe, because if it was truly a good world with a good God and all, he surely wouldn't have done those horrible things. More specifically, [[spoiler: when [[ItMakesSenseInContext Brady's attempt to poison some hamburger to kill a dog instead kills his mother, hamburger and poison he specifically bought to bring pain to his current nemesis]].]] nemesis]],]] Brady blamed Detective Hodges.


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* TheSociopath: Brady. He is a highly intelligent and manipulative man who feels no empathy toward others and no remorse for anything he does. While he is genuinely upset when [[spoiler: he accidentally kills his mother,]] he feels no guilt at all over it and instead [[NeverMyFault blames Hodges]].

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** Thanks to the omission of the Slapper, the TV series instead shows us a rather unconventional use for a cast-bronze bulldog statuette. [[spoiler: As above, Brady is also given this lesson.]]

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* RaceLift: Pete and Izzy, Bill's old police associates, are distinctly described as being white in the book. In the TV series, they're black and Latina respectively.


* SequelHook : The ending. Given there are two upcoming sequels, it's not surprising.

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* SequelHook : The ending. Given there are two upcoming sequels, it's not surprising. [[spoiler: Brady wakes up.]]
* ShoutOut: Because the TV series omits Hodges' Happy Slapper, [[spoiler: Holly instead caves Brady's head in using [[Literature/{{Misery}} an animal figurine]]]].

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** Charlotte Gibney is a much more cut-and-dry example, degrading and downsizing Holly's psychological issues and insistently treating her like a child. The narration makes it plain that Holly's life is awful and her mental state is in a constant flux - and that Charlotte is more or less to blame for all of it.


* AdaptationalVillainy: Countering Show!Brady's less-psychopathic personality, the TV series gives him a ''much'' higher body count (eighteen at City Center as opposed to eight, plus his onscreen murder of [[spoiler: Ryan Springhill and Anthony Frobisher]]). He also [[spoiler: deliberately kills Janey, rather than doing it by accident, as another means to drive Bill toward suicide]].

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* AdaptationalVillainy: Countering Show!Brady's less-psychopathic personality, the TV series gives him a ''much'' higher body count (eighteen at City Center as opposed to eight, plus his onscreen murder murders of [[spoiler: Ryan Springhill and Anthony Frobisher]]). He also [[spoiler: deliberately kills Janey, rather than doing it by accident, as another means to drive Bill toward suicide]].


* AdaptationalVillainy: Countering Show!Brady's less-psychopathic personality, the TV series gives him a ''much'' higher body count (eighteen at City Center as opposed to eight, plus his onscreen murder of [[spoiler: Ryan Springhill]]). He also [[spoiler: deliberately kills Janey, rather than doing it by accident, as another means to drive Bill toward suicide]].

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* AdaptationalVillainy: Countering Show!Brady's less-psychopathic personality, the TV series gives him a ''much'' higher body count (eighteen at City Center as opposed to eight, plus his onscreen murder of [[spoiler: Ryan Springhill]]).Springhill and Anthony Frobisher]]). He also [[spoiler: deliberately kills Janey, rather than doing it by accident, as another means to drive Bill toward suicide]].


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* DeathByAdaptation: [[spoiler: Anthony Frobisher - Brady's stuck-up, casually homophobic boss - survives the book without a scratch. In the series, Brady ambushes him in his own home and rather graphically caves his head in with a hammer.]]


* AgeLift: Holly is considerably younger in the TV series, likely as a means to emphasize her eventual role as a surrogate daughter figure to Hodges and to remove the books' ambiguity as to the nature of their relationship.

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* AgeLift: Holly is considerably younger in the TV series, series (31 as opposed to 45), likely as a means to emphasize her eventual role as a surrogate daughter figure to Hodges and to remove the books' ambiguity as to the nature of their relationship.

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* AdaptationalHeroism: The TV series adapts out most of Bill's vengeful, hard-headed drive to catch Brady on his own, making him seem vastly less reckless and selfish than his book counterpart.


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* AdaptationalVillainy: Countering Show!Brady's less-psychopathic personality, the TV series gives him a ''much'' higher body count (eighteen at City Center as opposed to eight, plus his onscreen murder of [[spoiler: Ryan Springhill]]). He also [[spoiler: deliberately kills Janey, rather than doing it by accident, as another means to drive Bill toward suicide]].

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* AgeLift: Holly is considerably younger in the TV series, likely as a means to emphasize her eventual role as a surrogate daughter figure to Hodges and to remove the books' ambiguity as to the nature of their relationship.


* AdaptationPersonalityChange: Mostly minor ones, but still present. The TV series presents Bill as being both grumpier and more psychologically damaged in the aftermath of Brady's killing spree and his own failure to bring Brady to justice. In addition - and perhaps mercifully - the show completely adapts out Jerome's "Tyrone" persona. However, some of the most prominent changes can be seen in Brady himself. In the book, King establishes him as a dead-set, [[PoliticallyIncorrectVillain bigoted]] sociopath, whereas Show!Brady is more classically ''insane,'' displaying the tiniest flashes of compassion in his madness and apparently possessing legitimate affection for his coworker Lou (Freddi in the books).

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* AdaptationPersonalityChange: Mostly minor ones, but still present. The TV series presents Bill as being both grumpier and more psychologically damaged in the aftermath of Brady's killing spree and his own failure to bring Brady to justice. In addition - and perhaps mercifully - the show completely adapts out Jerome's "Tyrone" persona. However, some of the most prominent changes can be seen in Brady himself. In the book, King establishes him as a dead-set, [[PoliticallyIncorrectVillain bigoted]] sociopath, whereas Show!Brady is more classically ''insane,'' displaying the tiniest flashes of compassion in his madness and apparently possessing legitimate affection for his coworker Lou (Freddi in the books). He's also much more openly repulsed by his relationship with his mother, actually rejecting her advances at one point.


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* {{Foil}}: Brady and Holly serve this role in relationship to one another. Both are grown adults who, thanks to their abusive mothers damaging them in fundamentally different but equally detrimental ways, never had an opportunity to become emotionally mature. But where Brady is self-absorbed and hateful, blaming society for his circumstances and failings, Holly is endearing, kindhearted, and completely ungrudging toward the world.


* AdaptationPersonalityChange: Minor ones, but still present. The TV series presents Bill as being both grumpier and more psychologically damaged in the aftermath of Brady's killing spree and his own failure to bring Brady to justice. In addition - and perhaps mercifully - the show completely adapts out Jerome's "Tyrone" persona.

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* AdaptationPersonalityChange: Minor Mostly minor ones, but still present. The TV series presents Bill as being both grumpier and more psychologically damaged in the aftermath of Brady's killing spree and his own failure to bring Brady to justice. In addition - and perhaps mercifully - the show completely adapts out Jerome's "Tyrone" persona. However, some of the most prominent changes can be seen in Brady himself. In the book, King establishes him as a dead-set, [[PoliticallyIncorrectVillain bigoted]] sociopath, whereas Show!Brady is more classically ''insane,'' displaying the tiniest flashes of compassion in his madness and apparently possessing legitimate affection for his coworker Lou (Freddi in the books).



** Show-only character Ryan Springhill is an unstable, loud-mouthed [[PoliticallyIncorrectVillain Neo-Nazi and homophobe]] [[spoiler: whose brutal vehicular homicide at Brady's hands is ''entirely'' more satisfying than it should be]].



* PetTheDog: Despite being an unrepentant murderer nearly completely devoid of empathy, Show!Brady seems to legitimately regard his coworker Lou (Freddi in the books) as something of a friend. He makes an effort to cheer her up when she's run ragged by a flagrantly homophobic regular at their workplace...[[spoiler:[[AssholeVictim and later murders the customer in question to make him pay for ridiculing the two of them]]]].



* PoliticallyIncorrectVillain: Brady takes issue with biracial relationships and black people in general.

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* PoliticallyIncorrectVillain: Brady takes issue with biracial relationships and black people in general. This personality trait, for better or for worse, is totally omitted in the show.

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