YMMV / The Mist


     The 2007 Movie 
  • Acceptable Religious Targets: Mrs. Carmody, who is deeply religious... and insane.
    • And wrong. As any one who deals with predators and wild animals can tell you, half of the things she did would have simply attracted more of them.
    • As well, most religious scholars would, well, let's just say take exception to her interpretation of the Bible.
  • Anvilicious/Family-Unfriendly Aesop: A few.
    • Humans Are the Real Monsters.
    • Life Isn't Fair.
    • When faced with certain death, people will do anything when offered a solution.
    • Some people are so just so corrupt and insane that it's only a matter of time before killing is the only option.
  • Awesome Music: "The Host Of Seraphim" by Dead Can Dance, used in the last 8-10 minutes of the movie.
  • Catharsis Factor: Mrs. Carmody wears out her welcome within seconds of opening her mouth. Over the course of the film, she repeatedly calls Amanda a whore, terrifies children with her ravings about demons, attempts to physically attack an elderly woman, preaches against scientific progress, causes the murder of Wayne Jessup, and tries to have a young boy sacrificed. When Ollie finally shoots her in the stomach and then blows her wicked, tiny brains out of her evil head, it is immensely satisfying.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse: Ollie and Irene.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
  • Idiot Plot: Let's count the ways:
    • Instead of either telling everybody about the big tentacle monster and showing them the cut-off part or keeping their mouths shut completely, David and the other guys do everything they can to come off as babbling idiots to just about everybody and blow their only piece of evidence on just a couple of people. Although to be fair, they most likely didn't know that the tentacle would disintegrate upon touching it.
    • When the front window starts getting flocked by giant bugs, nobody spends even two seconds to think "gee, maybe they are being attracted to the lights just like normal bugs tend to be". Instead, the crowd fills the front window with lights, some idiot turns on the floodlights in the back and it is only after the window starts getting smashed up by the bat creatures that somebody thinks that doing this might be a bad idea.
    • On the trip to the pharmacy, the group takes its sweet time browsing and grabbing an entire pile of pills, when they're all on their toes and should be working as fast as possible. And when one of them starts hearing strange noises, do they get the hell outta Dodge? No, they investigate the noises, and when the creepy crawlies inevitably show up, instead of legging it like they should, they just stand there and scream. No wonder they lost two people.
    • Despite being desperate for communications throughout the entire film, nobody thinks to look in the MP's jeep, which is parked only feet from the front door. When Laurie Holden produces her gun, there's also a discussion about who is qualified to carry it - ignoring the three soldiers in the store. Even if the townsfolk didn't trust them, they aren't even mentioned. Similarly, despite characters voicing suspicions that the military was somehow involved (and David observing them behaving oddly before arriving at the store), nobody thinks to ask the Soldiers if they knew anything until days into the disaster, and its too late as the only two who knew anything had already killed themselves.
      • Speaking of being desperate for communications, nobody in David's truck even considers the possibility of listening to the radio. The entire ending could have been avoided if they just turned on the car radio and listened for anything that could've helped them survive. No doubt the military was sending out radio messages trying to contact survivors.
    • Oh, and the big one: Letting Mrs. Carmody preach to the crowd. Her speeches do nothing but stress the survivors out even more than they already are and one of the characters notes early on that she might cause real problems if she manages to gain any followers. Yet it takes most of the film and her calling for the sacrifice of David's son to make somebody finally take care of her. Yes, the central conflict of the movie could've been easily resolved in 10 minutes through a liberal use of clothesline, duct tape and a bathroom stall. Nice job, protagonists.
      • On the other hand, hogtying someone in a crisis just because you don't like what they have to say would also stress out everyone else. How long will it be before I say something you don't like, and at what point do they run out of clotheslines, duct tape, and bathroom stalls, and alternative measures must be explored.
  • Love It or Hate It: The ending. You'll either find it pleasantly shocking and edgy, or far too depressing.
  • Love to Hate: Mrs. Carmody, whose character, personality-wise, is basically Dolores Umbridge with a religious twist.
  • Moral Event Horizon: Mrs. Carmody starts off unbalanced (though more conflicted and likeable in the movie than the original story), then becomes the chosen messiah of the people, and starts ordering human sacrifices to the monsters outside. Okay. This is a horror movie. Then she orders David's son and the woman who had been keeping the kid calm this entire time to be thrown to the monsters...
    • And by convincing her cult to sacrifice Wayne Jessop, she probably attracted even more monsters to the store by putting the smell of blood and an easy meal into the air.
  • Narm:
    • Starts with guy doing painting during a storm. The power goes out and he gives a dramatic look towards the storm, as if trying to make the audience feel the ominousness of this mundane storm. The family goes to the basement, then a tree unceremoniously bursts through the window by the paintings. Fade to black. And on it goes, basically every other scene in the movie that attempts to be dramatic seems narm-ish as well.
    • Dude somehow conscious and talking even though he hasn't had food or water for a while and has been enduring a serious injury in the form of spiders under his skin somehow turns a tense scene into an "oh you've got to be kidding me" lolfest as the scene gets more ridiculous and still the main characters don't seem to have the survival instinct to get out of there.
    • The ending is a massive and rather cruel Tear Jerker, but David's weird, Tarzan-esque screams after he shoots everyone is a bit of a mood-killer in an otherwise powerful scene. Here's one interpretation of what he's screaming about.
    • There's a webbed-up corpse in the bus that looks more like a store mannequin.
  • One-Scene Wonder: Melissa McBride plays a woman who begs for help right after the mist hits, as she has to get home to her two children, but it is clearly dangerous to go outside. When no one will agree to help, she enters the mist alone. Her scene is brief, but sets the tone for the rest of the movie. Frank Darabont loved her performance so much that he wrote her into the final scene of the movie. Like the novella, she originally was going to have her fate ambiguous.
  • Retroactive Recognition: Ollie is the Dream Lord.
  • The Scrappy: Unlike Mrs. Carmody, who seems to have a Love to Hate reputation, Jim is disliked for being a downright wimpy Jerk Ass and for constantly burdening people who are trying to keep a low profile from the monsters. It certainly doesn't help his case when he joins Mrs. Carmody's cult.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks: Some viewers do not take the changed ending of the film adaptation very well.
  • Too Cool to Live: Ollie, the store clerk with the handgun.
  • Unintentionally Unsympathetic: The mother that flees the store to get home to her children is clearly meant to be sympathetic due to her motives and the others in the store are clearly ashamed at not helping her, but leaving two children, the eldest being eight, to care for themselves so soon after a massive storm is incredibly irresponsible and her attempt to essentially guilt trip people, including a man looking after his own scared child, into joining her despite warnings against leaving can put her squarely here. Her self righteousness at everyone else for not wanting to potentially throw away their lives for her highlights it. The fact she survives the film feels less like a hope spot and more like an extra knife twist in the already depressing ending.
  • What an Idiot:
    • Giant bugs start appearing at night. What does everybody do? Why, rush to the windows with flashlights to attract more bugs, of course! To be fair, it wasn't until the bat creatures that things started to go to hell.
    • Brent Norton constantly saying that there are no monsters in the mist and saying that David planned everything to get back at him.

    The 2017 TV Show 
  • Family-Unfriendly Aesop: Being a bisexual Non-Action Guy Woobie who is bullied by his father and half the town and whose only friends are the main character family does not mean that you can't also be a psychopath who raped Alex purely to frame Jay and drive a wedge between them, killed his own father and tried to kill and leave for dead his surrogate father.
  • Idiot Plot:
    • The mall decides to hold a raffle to determine who is going to go into the mist infested hallway to find the radio in the security office. Meanwhile, the manager and security guard are both right there, both of which know not only the layout but the location of the radio and how it works, not to mention the fact that it is their job to keep everyone else safe. Nah, let's send Eve, who has no idea where it is or how to use it, to find it. A character even mentions this exact point, but is immediately brushed off and ignored.
    • When grabbing the radio, a man volunteers to go with Eve. They find it, and he turns out to be either a soldier or someone with inside knowledge, because he begins to call for Arrowhead, the shady government military base where the mist is likely coming from. Upon realizing that he might be the key to their survival, or at least has knowledge that might help... she decides to freak out, attack him unprovoked because he didn't answer her questions fast enough, break the radio, and get into a wrestling match, ultimately ending by killing him with his own handgun. She attacks first. She then exits and apparently everyone else in the mall wandered off after a few minutes, leaving the doorway entirely unattended even though what came through that door might save all of them, and ignoring the gunshot that rang out in an otherwise quiet mall.
      • Bonus: it all could have been avoided! The undercover soldier could have gone in completely alone to do whatever he wanted to do, because the mall manager asked for volunteers. Rather than volunteer, he waited for Eve to be selected, and then chose to go with her.
  • Narm:
    • Nathalie's husband being approached out of absolutely nowhere by a man with a gun, who immediately points it at him, shoots him in the head, before screaming that he "didn't mean to" and turning the gun on himself and committing suicide. It was completely absurd.
    • Adrian's tumble down the stairs when escaping the police station. The actor clearly just ducks down and rolls forward onto the ground, flopping down the stairs.
    • The four horsemen of the apocalypse emerging from the Mist and killing Father Romanov is played for drama, but it is such a Big-Lipped Alligator Moment and is never explained beyond "the Mist manifests your worst fears".
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks: The decision to add more overtly supernatural and mystical elements to the Mist (such as its sentience and ability to summon hallucinations and spirits) rather than keeping it a weather phenomenon filled by monstrous-yet-biologically-plausible animals has not been well received.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/YMMV/TheMist