YMMV / The Aristocats

  • Alternative Character Interpretation: Is Edgar really a villain, or a Woobie, Destroyer of Worlds? After all, he put the cats to sleep and abandoned them when he could have poisoned them.
    • On that note, did he expect them to survive, or was he trying to kill them? That was enough sleeping pills for a human to have to worry about an overdose, and we never saw how he planned to dispose of the bodies.
  • Awesome Music: The Sherman Brothers' opening song. They even got Maurice Chevalier to come out of retirement to sing it!
  • Big Lipped Alligator Moment: Both comedy scenes involving Edgar and the hound dogs. The first occurs when Edgar is trying to dump the cats in the countryside. The only event that's strictly relevant to the plot - when Edgar loses the basket - happens early in the scene. The slapstick chase sequence goes on for about five minutes, involving Edgar getting flung into the air twice and a windmill. The second scene, where Edgar returns and retrieves the objects he lost during the chase, isn't actually required for the plot at all.
  • Designated Villain: Edgar is implied to have been a dutiful servant to Madame Adelaide for years if not decades, and now finds out she's leaving her entire fortune to her cats before him, specifically telling her lawyer that Edgar will only get the money once each of her cats has lived out their lives. Considering Edgar is getting the shaft despite his years of service, is shown to live in squalor, and that it's implied Adelaide is maybe a little senile given she's obviously a Crazy Cat Lady, it's not hard to understand his actions. He also never really crosses the Moral Event Horizon prior to the finale — despite having numerous, easier opportunities to just kill them and get it over with, Edgar only ever attempts to get rid of the cats, and never physically harms them until his Villainous Breakdown.
  • Ear Worm: Most of the songs:
    • "Ta-ra-ra-BOOM-de-ay, ta-ra-ra-BOOM-de-ay!"
    • Scales And Arpeggios anyone?
    • Ev'rybody wants to be a cat, because a cat's the only cat who knows where it's at...
    • Many of the characters' Leitmotifs as well, like Edgar, or the Gobble Sisters.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse:
    • The hound dogs, who come close to stealing the show despite only having a few scenes.
    • Marie also happens to pretty much be the sole representative of this film these days. She even has her own merchandise line, and is insanely popular in Japan (and the rest of Asia)!
  • Ethnic Scrappy: Shun Gon, the Chinese member of Scat Cat's gang. He's not a villain, but he has the buck teeth and the exaggerated accent.
  • Germans Love David Hasselhoff:
    • Marie is getting a disproportionate amount of attention in Japan, and is more frequently featured in Tokyo Disneyland. The reason why? Japanese love kittens. So much so that she's gotten her own manga that was released in Japan a few years ago called "Miriya & Marie"
    • Marie is also popular in Brazil.
      • This has also spread to the rest of Asia. If you're looking for Aristocats merchandise outside Japan, you won't find any outside of the DVD and Blu-Ray, and the occasional novelization and picture book. Marie merchandise, on the other hand...
    • Much like Duffy the Disney Bear, this is translating back to the American parks: there is now a walkaround character of her who hangs out in Epcot's France pavilion in the World Showcase and recently moved to the Magic Kingdom in Walt Disney World.
    • The film itself in Italy, thanks mostly to a creative dub job which transforms O'Malley into a Roman playboy named Romeo.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • A cat playing the piano?
    • Georges's comment on not being as spry as he was when he was 80 and his general denial of his advanced age are more amusing when it's taken into consideration that his voice actor managed to live up to 102.
    • Roquefort dons a deerstalker and cape when he goes out to look for the cats. Cut to 1986...
    • The roguish male protagonist wants to take the aristocratic female protagonist on a magic carpet ride?
  • Jerkass Woobie: Edgar to some point of view.
  • Moral Event Horizon: Edgar attacking O'Malley with a pitchfork (regardless of whether he intended to kill him or just pin him against the wall). Then again, he did have a few lives to spare.
  • Most Wonderful Sound: Duchess' voice.
  • No Celebrities Were Harmed: One of Scat Cat's friends bears a resemblance to Elton John.
  • One-Scene Wonder:
    • Bill Thompson as the hilariously drunk Uncle Waldo. Even the main characters comment on it.
      "I like Uncle Waldo."
      "Yes, especially when he's 'marinated.'"
    • Unfortunately, this was also Bill Thompson's final role in an animated film, due to him dying of septic shock a few months later.
  • Rooting for the Empire: Edgar has his fair share of fans who believe has reason to act having been passed over in favor of Madame's cats.
  • Strawman Has a Point: Edgar's reason for abducting the cats.
  • Suspiciously Similar Song: The Goose Sisters' theme music is remarkably similar to "Baby Elephant Walk".
  • Tear Jerker: The scene where Marie hears about Thomas O'Malley and Duchess thinks they're leaving after the Scat Cats leave.
    • The scene where their owner discovers her cats have gone missing.
  • Values Dissonance: If the film were made more recently, it's seriously doubtful they'd be able to get away with having an Asian cat who has crooked eyes, buck teeth, a thick accent, and plays the piano with his chopsticks, playing a 'Chopsticks' style melody filled with Asian buzzwords (even worse, Chinese-sounding gibberish in some dubs). Nor is it likely he could have worn a cymbal like a rice hat.
  • What an Idiot:
    • The entire plot hinges on the fact that Edgar apparently believes cats literally have nine lives and, based on his calculations, believes the cats will take turns aging. He picks what he considers to be a cat's life expectancy, multiplies it by the number of lives and then multiplies the result by the number of cats. There is also that fact that the Disney Encyclopedia writer, John Grant, points out that had Edgar obeyed the wishes of the will, he would have had a guaranteed job taking care of Madame's "heirs" until he almost certainly outlives them and gets the remainder of the inheritance all for himself.
    • When the cats return home, Roquefort tries warn the kittens that Edgar could be setting a trap for them. They mistake his jumping around for being excited to see that they made it back and don't take his warning seriously. They are then captured by Edgar.
    • During the climatic battle, as Roquefort tries to unlock the chest they're locked in and as Edgar is being attacked by the alley cats, Rouquefort gets them all to temporarily stop their fight and hold still so he can consentrate on unlocking it. Edgar doesn't take the opportunity to stop the mouse.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/YMMV/TheAristocats