YMMV: Lord of the Flies

  • Angel/Devil Shipping: Ralph and Jack. While Ralph is no saint himself, he definitely is one of the most innocent boys on the island, especially when compared to Jack. Ralph turns from an immature kid into a really kind, calm and considerate boy, not to mention that he is completely broken in the end, while Jack starts the same as Ralph, but he goes into the opposite direction, as he becomes even more malicious, rude, abusive and sadistic in the end. Ralph also represents the civil, moral part of the human mind, while Jack represents the primal instincts, the darkest, most savage part. Then there is the whole blonde hair- red hair contrast which strengthens this implication, as older beliefs considered fair hair to be of good will, while red hair was supposed to suggest evil.
    • Also, Simon/Roger, with Simon being one of the most innocent children on the island, while Roger is one of the most savage ones.
  • Anvilicious: The book goes about preaching its message with the subtlety of a rhino in heat.
  • Cargo Ship:
    • Piggy and the conch.
    • Roger and his rocks. Alternatively, Roger and his sharped-at-both-sides spear.
    • Ralph and the conch too. Also, Jack and the pig.
  • Chaotic Evil: Jack's leading style. He is also the one that starts the whole chaos on the island.
  • Complete Monster: While Lord of the Flies reveals the savagery people can descend to, Roger, the right hand man of Jack, was already a beast before he came to the island and only needed the lack of consequences to embrace his true nature. Roger becomes the chief torturer and executioner of Jack's group, keeping others in line with threats of impalement and tortures those who won't submit to Jack. He is also the only boy to commit cold-blooded murder by crushing the boy Piggy's head when Piggy desperately tries to restore sanity.
  • Draco in Leather Pants: Jack Merridew has probably the most fans in the lotf fandom, even though he's a sociopathic control-freak, who has no morality in the book. Roger also has a lot of fans.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse: You'd be hard-pressed to find a reader who didn't like Simon. Roger as well — at least it's nice to see one character who has no charade about what he wants out of the island.
  • Family-Unfriendly Aesop: The book was written just to say Humans Are Bastards and Hobbes Was Right, a Take That to all the Rousseau Was Right works of the time.
    • Some have read it as a slightly friendlier Aesop against the racial stereotypes of the era, showing that under the wrong circumstances even British schoolboys fall into savagery just as easily as any "inferior" cultures.
  • Fanfic Fuel: None of the boys' pasts is revealed in the book (except for some details about Ralph and Piggy), nor is their fate after the island.
  • Fan-Preferred Couple: Fanfiction and fanart seem to prefer Jack/Ralph (Jalph) most of the time, even though there is fanwork with other couples too, like Roger/Simon, Jack/Roger and Ralph/Simon.
  • Foe Yay: Quite a lot, between Jack and Ralph. One particular quote: Now it was Ralph's turn to flush but he spoke despairingly [...] "Why do you hate me?" The boys stirred uneasily, as though something indecent had been said. The silence lengthened.
  • Freud Was Right: Spearing a mother pig — described much like how a rape would be described.
  • Inferred Holocaust: The navy shows up at the end to rescue the boys. It seems like a happy ending... until you remember that a nuclear war had been going on at the start of the book, which means that Britain (and the rest of the world) is most likely in a sorry state. Not exactly the best thing to come home to after struggling for survival on a remote island.
  • Magnum Opus: It's Golding's best-known work by far.
  • Memetic Mutation: "Sucks to your ass-mar."
  • Memetic Sex God: Jack Merridew, good lord, and how. Just read the fanfiction and go on tumblr.
  • Moral Event Horizon: The frenzied, hysterical killing of Simon by Jack and the other boys comes dangerously close to it. It's finally crossed (and in a very symbolic way) when Roger pushes a massive boulder down on Piggy, sending him flying off the cliff and to his death.
    • Oddly enough, the killing of a sow, with metaphors to make it sound like gang rape, is supposed to be the first indication the horizon has been crossed, or was about to be crossed pretty soon.
  • Narm: Piggy's death in the 1960s film.
    • In the 90s film as well. Especially the way Ralph screams "NOOOOO!" before he gets killed, and that deadpan pause after his head gets crushed.
    • The tribal dance around the fire in the second movie. The gratuitous slow motion didn't help, either.
    • Let's not forget that, with no dialog, the Lord's big scene in the '60s movie becomes, essentially, Simon having a Staring Contest with the head.
  • One-Scene Wonder: The titular Lord of the Flies only appears at the end of chapter eight. However it has an amazing impact and is probably one of the best scenes in the book, showing that Tropes Are Not Bad.
  • OTP: Jack/Ralph is for those who like a love/hate romance. Ralph/Simon for those who love a cute, wholesome romance. Jack/Roger for those who are into a psycho dark romance between two psychos.
  • Red Eyes, Take Warning: Fanart often seems to depict Roger with red eyes.
  • Toy Ship: All of the named characters in the book are, at most, just barely pubescent. For some reason, this doesn't seem to stop the fandom shipping them in every possible combination.
  • Values Dissonance: The '63 film had prepubescent nudity. It was completely non-sexual and realistic, but because of the Pædo Hunt, modern audiences are met with shock and disgust at the film showing young boys' boy parts.
  • "Weird Al" Effect: Far fewer people remember the works (such as Two Years Vacation and Coral Island) that Lord of the Flies was parodying than they do Lord of the Flies itself. The fact that it was a Deconstructive Parody is also not well-known.
  • What an Idiot: Piggy telling Ralph about a nickname he doesn't want to be called.
  • The Woobie: Piggy. He actually hates that nickname, but even Ralph insists on calling him that. We never learn his actual name. Plus he's asthmatic, nearsighted, and almost only valued because his glasses help create the fire. While he may be a Non-Action Guy, he (unlike Ralph) actually does Dare to Be Badass and confronts Jack and his vicious tribe. A pity it didn't save his life...