Video Game / Romance of the Three Kingdoms

A series of strategy games by Koei. It's based on the Romance of the Three Kingdoms novel, which is a fictionalized version of actual Chinese history. It also spawned an action game spinoff, Dynasty Warriors.


This game series provides examples of:

  • Alternate History: You can create your own by playing these games.
    • XIII in particular has an Alternate History scenario for anyone who plays through all the historical campaigns of Hero Mode. The POD is upon the death of Zhuge Liang, where Jiang Wei ignores Zhuge's wishes and allows Wei Yan to have control of the army. Shu is able to retain the gains made in Liangzhou during Zhuge Liang's final campaign, extending its control to Anding, Jincheng, and Wuwei. Now, in 239, Sima Yi has accelerated his plots, driving Xiahou Ba to defect to Shu nearly a decade earlier than IOTL. Seeing a division in Wei, Jiang Wei uses this opportunity to drive toward Luoyang, capturing Changan and Hongnong along the way. After the Wei defeat at Hongnong, Sima Yi seizes control of the emperor, dividing Wei in two, with Cao Shuang retaining control of Xuchang, Runan, Wan, Xinye, and Xiangyang. Jiang Wei's decision to capture Cao Shuang's cities before taking on Sima Yi earns the respect of Wei Yan, who accepts Jiang as his superior. With overall control of the Shu armies, Jiang Wei forces a final confrontation with Sima Yi, defeating him decisively at Ye and giving Shu hegemony in China.
  • Bad Ass: Many characters are statted to be in line with their fictional counterparts. Lu Bu is a demon on horseback and in later games, when dueling is brought into the series, can easily defeat an enemy general in one hit.
  • Badass Army/Elite Mooks: In X, Cao Cao (and by extension, his eventual successors) has special unit that is only available for their forces: Qing Elite.
  • Berserk Button: Elephant units in X will lose control of itself and will attack any nearby units, friend or foe, if it's attacked by or around the vicinity of fire attack.
  • Black Comedy/Hypocritical Humor: In X, be a ruler and conquer a city. Then execute any captured enemy general who has in-game family member as officer, who will eventually hold a grudge to you to no end in a You Killed My Father fashion. Then, attack another city where said officer is stationed. If he's captured, try to recruit him but of course since you killed his family before, he will refuse ("Serve you!? You Have Got to Be Kidding Me!! I'd rather die!"), so you will only have two available options left: release him or execute him. If you choose the latter, there's a chance that he will scream a Big "NO!" as if forgetting that earlier he said he'd rather die.
  • Chewbacca Defense: In XI, using the Sophistry option would have your officer throw in a ridiculous, silly statement that gives the opposing officer damage and leaving them confused on what your officer just say. Oh and randomly changes topic.
  • Combination Attack:
    • In IX, when two compatible generals are paired into the same unit, they sometimes both trigger an special attack at the same time, causing more casualties to the enemy forces.
    • In XI, this doesn't happen if the two compatible leaders are in the same unit, but if they're each leading a different unit within attacking range of the same enemy unit. There's a chance that attacking with one will cause the other's unit to run in and do some damage as well, without using up the unit's attack for the turn.
    • In XIII, when a general execute his special ability near another general's unit who are bonded together, that ability will be improved.
  • Continuity Nod: Nobunaga's Ambition (a similar game set in Japan) characters have their portraits available to you in the Create an Officer mode if you beat the game in some versions.
    • Other warlords from other periods in China's history are also playable.
  • Defeat Means Friendship: In XI, your subordinate officers often find free officers in their towns and ask them to join your force. A duel is suggested to see if you're worthy of their services. If you win, those officers join your army, even if you purposefully wounded them numerous times during the duel.
    • Some officers have to be recruited this way, although in some rarer cases, a debate is used instead of a duel.
    • In XIII, you occasionally have to duel with free officers before they'd join your force.
      • Also in XIII, once your Relationship Values with a given officer get to a certain level (80), you are given a quest whose completion will result in being friends. One of the quests is a duel where, if you win, you and the officer become friends. Also, defeating an especially powerful officer Charms many of the other officers in the city, making it easier to become friends with them as well.
  • Downer Ending: If you did poorly on your way to uniting China and choose your strategists and heir equally poorly in some later games, it turns out that your empire may not last as long as you would have hoped.
    • If you play a vassal and unite China in the name of your lord, you may wind up being executed because the lord fears your great ability if you have a poor relationship with him.
  • Easy Logistics: Especially in the later games, quite well averted. In XI, for instance, you need to take food along with your army on trips, and occasionally gold, if you intend to rest your troops somewhere, to pay your officers. If you don't do the former, then your army will slowly starve to death, and if you don't do the later, officers will lose loyalty.
    • In XIII things went back a bit. Even though gold and food are kept in each city individually, you only have to click a few buttons and they will be transported to another city instantaneously. A later patch even automates this for you, feeding troops passing through your cities automatically with other city's food.
  • Joke Character: Many officers who are best known as being incompetent, such as Liu Shan, Xiahou Mao and Han Xuan, have abysmal stats. Especially Liu Shan, who has the lowest overall stat spread in some games.
    • Lethal Joke Character: That being said, Liu Shan usually has one of the best strategies in the game, especially in XIII where his stats have been buffed where he's simply weak instead of being completely useless. His XIII strategy, "Great Rebound", provides a massive +100 morale increase to you and your allies in range, a huge boost to their attack strength and heals their status ailments but costs a full 10-point strategy bar to use.
  • Kid Hero: Possible in XIII, where you can play individual officers. The youngest officer you can play (Cao Chang in Three Visits) is 12.
  • Kill It with Fire:
    • XI allows you to build fireballs that can damage multiple units in a line, as well as multiple structures when fully upgraded.
    • In X, all units whenever they are under command of officers and not "Lieutenants", they are able to use melee fire attack. If an officer with "Missile" skill use Archer unit, they can use fire arrows, or alternatively, use any unit that is equipped with Siege Tower.
  • Mook Lieutenant: In X, an officer can command more than one unit but they can only directly lead one. Other units under their command will be led by their unnamed "Lieutenant".
  • Morale Mechanic:
    • In X, units require high morale to move quickly and will retreat if their will is depleted.
    • In XI, unit morale is used for special attacks.
    • In XIII, unit morale will be reduced if it's pincered. If depleted, the unit will be confused and unable to fight for a short while.
  • Plot Armor: In X, as long as the story is still relatively on track, some forces (namely, Liu Bei) get attacked very infrequently, compared to how weak their cities are. Reinforced by the fact that, the minute the plot goes off track, they are instantly steamrolled by another force (namely, Cao Cao).
    • In XIII, there is an option to enable or disable this. It explicitly states that, if enabled, AI will try to follow the history.
  • Relationship Values: In XIII, in addition to the game's traditional loyalty mechanic, you can have Rapport with your ruler, fellow officers, or even officers or rulers from other forces.
  • RPG Elements: VII, VIII, X and XIII are all from the viewpoint of one officer whom you control. Other games in the series allow skill point upgrades as well.
  • Tactical Rock-Paper-Scissors:
    • In XI, Spears defeat Cavalry who defeat Pikes who defeat Spears. Archer units are equally affected and equally affects either. Swordsmen are free but they are weak against every other weapon types.
    • In X, Horses beat Foots, Foots beat Archers, Archers beat Horses unless they are directly near each other in which the Archers will use melee attack instead and in this situation, Archers and Horses are roughly even.
  • Video Game Cruelty Potential: In later games, when you capture the last city held by an enemy force, you capture every single officer in that city; sometimes it can be over 30. You can put them all under the sword. Some officers take the news of their upcoming deaths in dignity; others don't.
  • Video Game Long Runners: The first game came out for MS-DOS, NES and other systems in 1985, and has run on for over 11 games in 21 years. The latest in the series, XIII, has been released on 2016.


http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/VideoGame/RomanceOfTheThreeKingdoms