Trivia: Pearl Harbor

  • Bloopers
    • The building in the background of one scene with "EST 1953" painted on the side.
    • In one shot, the USS Arizona memorial is visible.
    • In the stock footage used, an M26 Pershing, a tank designed in the middle of the war, is seen.
  • Executive Meddling: Touchstone Pictures insisted on a PG-13 rating. This meant that even the non-bloody deaths had to be rushed, thus killing a lot of potential drama.
  • Fake American: Kate Beckinsale. Also Canadian-born Dan Aykroyd as the signals analyst.
  • Font Anachronism: The ticker-tape coded messages Capt. Thurman reads is printed out in Helvetica.
  • Hey, It's That Guy!:
  • Stan Winston: The injuries of the attack's victims crafted by Stan's studio were one of the film's redeeming points. Also responsible for turning Jon Voight convincingly into Franklin D. Roosevelt.
  • Theme Naming: The American battleships in the film, as in Real Life, are all named for US states. At the time, this theme extended to cruisers being named for cities, and later on "Large Cruisers" (never to be called "Battlecruisers" despite very strong design similarities) being named for territories. Destroyers were named for deceased servicemembers, and submarines for fish, sharks, and other aquatic life. Carriers of the time mostly inherited Legacy names from older ships. In later years submarines would be named for states (Missile Subs) and cities (Attack Subs), carriers mostly for Presidents, and battleships and cruisers have mostly been phased out of US Naval service in favor of bigger more powerful destroyers.
  • Weapons Understudies: Infamously, little to no effort was used to try and hide or disguise modern warships to match the early 1940's setting. Giveaways include angled flight decks on aircraft carriers (not introduced until 1952) and the lack of gun turrets on a group of Spruance class destroyers (most warships built after World War II were armed with missiles, rather than guns, and the gun-armed ships phased out of service).