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No Song for the Wicked
Many villains, especially from musicals or Disney animation, have impressive songs in which they boast about how good it feels being evil, or that use to expose their Evil Plan.

But there are also villains that don't have a song. While The Hero and his or her companions have their own musical numbers, the villain doesn't sing a single note. This choice can be made for various reasons: to show that the villain is a Serious Business individual, to highlight his or her scary nature, or maybe because the villain has a bad voice. It could also have happened that the villain was originally meant to have a song, but for various reason it ended up being cut.

Remember: this trope applies when there's the lack of a Villain Song in a work in which such a song would be expected.

Could overlap with Evil Has a Bad Sense of Humor, but not always. Evil Is Cool and Evil Is Hammy have less chance to apply to a villain who follows this trope.

Contrast Villain Song.

Examples:

Film - Animated
  • The Queen from Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.
  • Despite singing a single line while playing the piano, the Stepmother in Cinderella has no Villain Song, which makes her even more scary.
    • One of the stepsisters begins "Sing, Sweet Nightingale" while the other plays the flute, but mercifully our focus shifts to Cinderella's rendition.
  • Maleficent from Sleeping Beauty was actually going to have a Villain Song, but it was cut. She instead gloats over her evil deeds with a Villain Poem that mocks the traditional version of her Fairy Tale.
  • Tzekel-Kan in The Road to El Dorado didn't get a song, though he was originally going to have one during the scene where he takes control of the jaguar statue. It was called "Trust Me," and appears on the soundtrack.
  • Shan Yu from Mulan.
  • Jafar from Aladdin is a borderline case: he only did a Dark Reprise of "Prince Ali" but had no Villain Song of his own, although some were written for him.
    • In Aladdin: The Return of Jafar, however, he had "You're Only Second Rate".
    • In the stage musical, he gets one called 'Diamond in The Rough', in which he convinces Aladdin to go to the Cave of Wonders.
  • Hades from Hercules, despite being such a Large Ham. He did sing in the TV spinoff, however.
  • Shere Khan from The Jungle Book, who actually did not sing at all except for the final lyrics of "That's What Friends Are For." He was originally going to have his own Villain Song, however.
    • George Sanders does his very best to make his one singing line count, though, ending it on a bone-rattling bass note.
  • Inverted in Home on the Range where the evil cattle thief and yodeler Alameda Slim is the only character to sing in the film.
  • Frozen doesn't have a single straight example of Villain Song, despite numerous opportunities and near-misses. "Let It Go" is a Not Evil, Just Misunderstood Woobie, Destroyer of Worlds Unwitting Instigator of Doom song for Elsa, and Prince Hans's part of "Love is an Open Door" is a cleverly-disguised Villain Love Song, but neither the evil Duke of Wesselton nor post-Reveal Hans actually sing anything during their time on-screen.
    • "Let It Go" was going to be the Villain Song, but while it was being written the writers realized that it was too empowering to work as one; and also realized Elsa herself hadn't done anything wrong.
  • Neither Warren T. Rat from the first An American Tail movie nor Cat R. Waul from the second have a Villain Song, though the villains in the direct-to-video sequels have them.
  • Carface in All Dogs Go to Heaven.

Film - Live Action
  • Singin' in the Rain: Lina Lamont has no singing number, not counting the few lines of "Would You" she can be heard singing as Kathy overdubs her, since her voice is really awful. This is averted in the Screen-to-Stage Adaptation, which gives her a comic song, "What's Wrong With Me?"
  • In the movie version of Oliver!, Bill Sykes never sings, although other people sing about him. In the stage version, instead, he does.
  • In the classic 1939 film The Wizard of Oz, the Wicked Witch doesn't get to sing. It's worth noting, however, that her counterparts in The Wiz and Wicked do have songs.
    • Andrew Lloyd Webber wrote some new songs for the stage version of "The Wizard of Oz", including a song for the Witch called "Red Shoes Blues". The song is better than the title suggests and it basically opens the second act.
  • Inverted in Labyrinth — It was Jim Henson's idea to have a singing villain, and from there the filmmakers hired a performer who not only filled the role but also wrote all the songs. Jareth gets three on-screen musical numbers, and the only other characters who sing are a menacing Wacky Wayside Tribe.
  • Prudy, Penny's mother in Hairspray doesn't get to sing, although Alison Janney has a musical background.
  • The 1955 film version of Kismet falls into this by deleting the Wazir's Villain Song from the stage musical.

Live Action TV
  • There are many fans of Buffy who see the appeal of both the Musical Episode "Once More With Feeling," and the villainous activities of the Trio of Warren, Andrew, and Jonathan. Such fans would, no doubt, have loved for the episode to have a Villain Song by the Trio. The writers surely could have come up with something good, and of course the actors were all guest stars who were probably completely available for an episode in that season. No doubt, though, it would have been too difficult, and involved sacrificing too much of the screen time used for other stuff, to rewrite the episode in such a way that it included the Trio. But the magical effect that caused everyone to burst into song was operating throughout Sunnydale, so of course there must have been some such song that happened off-screen, which was not recorded by the TV show—but that's exactly the kind of thing Fan Fiction is for...

Theatre
  • In The Book of Mormon, the General doesn't get a Villain Song, and only gets to sing after he converts.
  • Finians Rainbow plays with this in an amusing way: Senator Rawkins doesn't sing and outright refuses to do so until his heart is magically lightened.
  • In Rose-Marie, the only singing parts for Emile and Hawley are buried in ensembles, usually quite short ones.
  • In Strike Up the Band, Sloane, "the villain of the play," has no song of his own.
  • While Show Boat doesn't really have a villain (not counting the character from the Show Within The Show, who is quite affable offstage), the most antagonistic characters in the first act, Parthy, Pete and Sheriff Vallon, don't sing at all.
  • In Tenderloin, though many lively musical numbers are put on by the "evil" Red Light District, the real villain, Lt. Schmidt, has a purely speaking part (not counting the trial scene, which is actually a satirical sketch where he's played by another character).

Western Animation
  • My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic has quite a few musical numbers, and while the majority of the songs are sung by Pinkie Pie, everyone else has gotten in on the action at least once — if not a solo number, then during a Crowd Song. However, neither Discord nor Trixie nor Nightmare Moon, three pretty hammy villains, has any song. King Sombra doesn't have one either (makes sense, since he barely says anything at all anyway). The Flim Flam Brothers do have songs in seasons 2 and 4 (although they're more antagonistic than evil), and Queen Chrysalis has her songnote  during the finale. And it is just awesome.
    • May not apply toDiscord as of S4 E11 with his song "A Little Glass of Water." He is considered to be "reformed" from his previous villain status at this point and never did sing while he was considered one. But he does remain rather morally ambiguous.
  • Squiddy from Team Umizoomi, other than the fake fanfare.


No Reprise PleaseMusical Number IndexOpening Chorus
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