troperville

tools

toys


main index

Narrative

Genre

Media

Topical Tropes

Other Categories

TV Tropes Org
random
Literature: Winnie the Pooh

Winnie-the-Pooh is a children's book written in 1926 by author A. A. Milne.

The first book had a sequel released in 1928 titled The House at Pooh Corner. Two books of poems — When We Were Very Young and Now We Are Six — include several poems about Winnie-the-Pooh and friends.

For the many adaptations of these books, go this way.

Winnie-the-Pooh provides example of the following tropes:

  • Abandoned Area: Pooh lives in a house with the name "Sanders" over it, despite none of the characters being able to read or spell very well. Piglet lives beside a sign that says Trespassers W (ill be prosecuted). Christopher Robin lives in a tree and his parents are missing. What happened to all the other humans in the area? Why did they leave?
  • Animal Stereotypes
  • Beary Funny / Beary Friendly: Pooh.
  • Big Eater: Pooh
  • Big Good: Christopher Robin
  • Black Bead Eyes: Most of the characters.
  • Carrying a Cake: Pooh brings a jar of honey for Eeyore's birthday.
  • Catchphrase
    • Pooh: "Bother!"
    • Christopher Robin: "Silly old Bear!"
    • Various characters/the narrator, "A bear of very little brain".
  • Children Are Innocent
  • Cloudcuckoolander: Just about anyone besides Eeyore. Kanga's a bit more stable, too, if a little overprotective.
  • Counting Sheep: Pooh tries to put himself to sleep by counting Heffalumps, but every Heffalump takes a pot of his honey, and when "the five hundred and eighty-seventh Heffalumps were licking their jaws, and saying to themselves, 'Very good honey this, I don't know when I've tasted better', Pooh could bear it no longer".
  • Covered in Mud: Pooh covers himself with mud to disguise himself as a rain cloud to fool the bees while he gets their honey. The bees aren't fooled.
  • Cryptic Background Reference: "Don't you know what ther means?"
  • Deadpan Snarker
    • Eeyore is good at this, much more so than in the Disney version.
    • Rabbit has a couple of moments as well.
  • Distressed Dude: Piglet, in the chapter in which he's Entirely Surrounded by Water
  • A Dog Named Dog: Piglet, Owl, and Rabbit. Played with for Kanga, Roo, and Tigger. Even Pooh is sometimes referred to as "Bear". It's pointed out in the book that his real name is Edward Bear, and Winnie-the-Pooh is just his nickname.
  • Dumb Is Good
  • The Eeyore: Trope Namer.
  • Exactly What It Says on the Tin: All chapter titles. The first one of the first book was called "In Which We Are Introduced to Winnie-the-Pooh and Some Bees and the Stories Begin", for crying out loud.
  • Fearless Fool: Piglet confesses to being afraid when carrying out the escape from Owl's fallen home, and is assured that makes him even more courageous.
  • Feigning Intelligence
  • Fish out of Water: Tigger
  • A Friend in Need
  • Ghibli Hills: The Forest in which all the characters live.
  • Going in Circles
  • Growing Up Sucks: The end of The House at Pooh Corner.
  • Hates Baths: Piglet. When he gets washed by Kanga, the first thing he does is look for a puddle to roll around in.
  • Have a Gay Old Time: It's somewhat impressive that a character named "Pooh" has managed to endure as long as it has with the same name, since the connotations of the word have changed a lot since the original book was printed. Probably because the toilet humor version is spelled differently. The News Quiz, however, was highly amused with a branding magazine talking about kids having "Pooh on their pyjamas, and Pooh on their facecloths". "Pooh" as an expression of contempt or annoyance still exists in the English language, even if it's not as commonly used as it once was.
  • Heterosexual Life-Partners: Pooh and Piglet. (Although, seeing as the book contains nothing even vaguely resembling sexuality or romance, it's more like Asexual Life Partners.)
  • Hufflepuff House: Rabbit's friends-and-relations
  • Iconic Sequel Character: Tigger wasn't introduced until the second Winnie-the-Pooh book and is now one of the most popular and recognizable characters from the franchise.
  • Idiosyncratic Episode Naming: See Exactly What It Says on the Tin.
  • Improbable Food Budget
  • In Which a Trope Is Described
  • Ironic Echo: "Oh, Tigger, I am glad to see you," cried Rabbit.
  • Kangaroos Represent Australia: Kanga and Roo.
  • Kids Prefer Boxes: Pooh intends to give Eeyore a jar of honey... and then absentmindedly eats the honey. Eeyore doesn't actually like honey, but he's very happy to be given the empty jar.
  • Know-Nothing Know-It-All: Owl (making him thereby a subversion of The Owl-Knowing One) and Rabbit.
  • Literal-Minded and Malaproper: Everything, being based on children's logic. For example, the idea that Pooh living "under the name of Sanders" means that he has the word written above his door.
  • Living Toys
  • Man Child: Tigger
  • Old Windbag: Owl
  • Once Upon a Time: "...a very long time ago, about last Friday, Winnie-the-Pooh lived in a forest all by himself under the name of Sanders."
  • Paper-Thin Disguise: Pooh, pretending to be a cloud
  • Parental Bonus/Genius Bonus: Many of the jokes will go straight over your average five-year-old's head.
  • Picky Eater: Tigger
  • The Power of Friendship
  • Primal Fear
  • Rouge Angles of Satin: Many of the jokes in the books are fueled by these.
  • Signs of Disrepair: The sign over Piglet's door, reading "Trespassers W", which he claims is short for the name of his grandfather, Trespassers William, or Trespassers Will for short. It's likely that the sign actually read "Trespassers will be shot"
  • Stock Animal Diet: Honey for Pooh.
  • Surrounded by Idiots: This was A.A. Milne's explanation for why Eeyore is depressed.
  • Sweet Tooth
  • Think Nothing of It
  • You Say Tomato: Being based on the playacting of a little boy, this is rather common. Notable examples include Woozles (weasels), Heffalumps (elephants), Jagulars (jaguars), Eeyore (Onomatopoeia for the braying of a donkey), Tigger (tiger) and Winnie the Pooh himself (based on Winnipeg, a bear at the London Zoo).
  • Zany Scheme: Several, including Pooh's plans to steal honey and catch a "Heffalump", and Rabbit's plans to kidnap Roo and "unbounce" Tigger.

WeLiterature of the 1920sWomen in Love
WinnetouChildren's LiteratureThe Wish Giver
Time TravelUsefulNotes/World War IGoodbye, Mr. Chips

alternative title(s): Winnie-the-Pooh
random
TV Tropes by TV Tropes Foundation, LLC is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available from thestaff@tvtropes.org.
Privacy Policy
17250
35