Film / Clash of the Titans (2010)
aka: Wrath Of The Titans

Clash of the Titans is a 2010 fantasy adventure film with some passing resemblance to the Greek myth of Perseus. It is a remake of Clash of the Titans (1981), and like that film contains no actual Titans.

A sequel, Wrath of the Titans,note  was released in April 2012. It does have Titans in it.

These two movies contain examples of:

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    Clash of the Titans 
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  • Action Girl: Io.
  • Adaptational Attractiveness: Medusa is a complicated example. The first myths of her state that she was so hideous, the sight turned men to stone. Other myths state that Medusa retained her mortal beauty as some kind of cruel irony, and that the powers were in her eyes. A third set offer a compromise and state that Medusa was both beautiful and terrible at the same time. The third appears to be the school of thought this * movie is following. Medusa is played by a supermodel — but gets a Game Face when she uses her powers.
  • Adaptational Badass: Medusa not only retains her archery skills from the original movie, but she now also adds Super Strength and Stealth Expert to her assets, and is able to strangle people like a boa snake, and keeps fighting after her head is cut off! And now her arrows hit with enough force to chip marble and a glancing hit caused Perseus to be Blown Across the Room into two of his teammates and knocking them away as well.
  • Adaptational Modesty: In the myth, Andromeda was sent out naked to be eaten by the sea monster. In the film, she gets some clothes.
  • Advertised Extra: Promos gave special focus to Danny Huston as Poseidon, Luke Evans as Apollo and Alexa Davalos as Andromeda. None of them gets more than about five minutes of screen time. In the latter two cases, the movie underwent extensive re-shoots and their characters ended up severely cut down. There was also considerable hype about some of the other Greek Gods, such as Hestia and Artemis. They would have had only a couple of lines in group scenes.
  • The Ageless: Io was cursed by the gods with agelessness. She mentions the burden of living on while her loved ones grew old and died.
  • Alternate DVD Commentary: Courtesy of Rifftrax and DVD Podblast.
  • Ancient Grome: Greek soldiers are seen dressed in Roman armour and wielding gladii.
  • Archnemesis Dad: Played with — Perseus starts off with a Rage Against the Heavens directed at the gods in general, and his father Zeus in particular, then reluctantly accepts his help against Hades, and eventually forgives/forgets Zeus' numerous crimes by the end, including the fact that Zeus raped Perseus' mom.
  • The Artifact: As Andromeda isn't Perseus's love interest any more, there's very little reason for her to appear — other than to be sacrificed to the Kraken. Likewise Calibos has very little reason to appear, as he's not Perseus's romantic rival — nor is Thetis an antagonist in the story.
  • Artistic License – History: Quite possibly. Zeus' totem is either a bald eagle (which are native to North America and which the Greeks wouldn't have known about) or an African fish eagle (native to Africa which they probably would have).
  • Back from the Dead: Io. Because Zeus said so.
  • Beauty Is Never Tarnished: Io always looks considerably better groomed than the rest of the men, who are all grubby and sweaty after the fight with the scorpions. Granted she's not involved in the fighting as the others are, but she still looks very good for someone travelling in the wild for a week.
  • Bed Trick: Perseus is born as the result of Zeus disguising himself as King Acrisius and sleeping with his wife Danae.
  • Big Creepy-Crawlies: Giant scorpions.
  • Big Damn Heroes:
    • How else would you describe Perseus riding in on a flying horse to kill the Kraken, simultaneously saving the girl and the day?
    • The two monster hunters appearing in the same scene on one of the scorpions to defend Perseus from some of the harpies.
  • Bishōnen: Perseus's friend and fellow warrior Eusebios.
  • Bloody Murder: An interesting (and awesome) variation. Through the magic of Hades, Calibos' blood becomes giant scorpions when it strikes the ground.
  • Bolt of Divine Retribution: Naturally, considering we're talking about Zeus here.
  • Broken Aesop
    Perseus: Screw you, Dad! I'm going to live as a man! [Flies away on Pegasus with immortal girlfriend and magic sword.]
  • Calling the Old Man Out: Zig-zagged with Perseus toward Zeus.
  • Canon Foreigner: Io is from a completely different myth.
  • Child by Rape: Perseus was conceived by a Bed Trick as punishment to King Acrisius for daring to challenge the gods. Zeus disguises himself as King Acrisius and sleeps with his queen, who gives birth almost immediately. Acrisius still has it in for Perseus, even though it wasn't his fault.
  • Clean Cut: When the hero slashes Medusa, she's standing right up for a few moments before her head finally falls off her shoulders.
  • Composite Character: Acrisius, Perseus' father, was melded with Calibos, The Brute, into the same person.
  • The Cuckoolander Was Right: Prokopion the zealot.
  • Curb-Stomp Battle: Hades himself finally enters the fray! Oh this is gonna be the big climactic awesome battle — oh wait, all Perseus needed to do was just toss his sword at him and Hades just.... goes home? Somewhat justified in that it's stated that when Perseus slays the Kraken, Hades will be drastically weakened and Zeus supercharged it with a Bolt of Divine Retribution as Perseus held it aloft. However, this does not make it less of a curb-stomp.
  • Cute Monster Girl: Medusa (except when using her petrification powers).
  • Darker and Edgier: To the point of only giving Bubo the mechanical owl a cameo (probably as they thought it would be too much of a Joke Character). Pretty-boy Perseus in the white toga is replaced with buzzcut grim Perseus in even more anachronistic medieval leather armor; Bubo is briefly show then as quickly cast aside; most of the winged horses are white but the Pegasus Perseus tames is jet black; and the toga-wearing Olympian thespians now wear late medieval plate armor. Of course, as the original was Extremely Cheesy, the remake has only been bumped down to Quite Cheesy.
  • Dark Is Evil: Hades.
  • Dark Is Not Evil: The Djinn, probably to compensate for Hades being bad. Pegasus is also dark colored too. However, the Djinn aren't good either... So, we can say that Dark Is Neutral, at least...
  • Defiled Forever: Zeus knocked up your queen? Kill her to get back at him.
  • Demoted to Extra:
    • Every deity bar Zeus (and Hades because he wasn't in the original film).
    • Cassiopeia is killed by Hades very quickly.
    • Andromeda is demoted from love interest and has only a few minutes of screen time.
  • Designated Love Interest: Io.
  • Do Not Taunt Cthulhu:
    • Note to Acrisius: When attempting to murder your wife and the bastard son of the thunder god, refrain from doing so on top of a cliff, in a storm while waving your sword around like a lightning rod. The results are... unpleasant to say the least.
    • Same goes for comparing your daughter's beauty to that of a goddess when humanity-divinity relations are already strained to the breaking point. Cassiopeia learns this lesson the hard way.
  • Double Standard: Rape, Divine on Mortal: Medusa and Danae, both of whom get punished for being raped.
  • The Dragon: Calibos to Hades.
  • Dull Surprise: All of Sam Worthington's performance as Perseus.
  • Dwindling Party: Don't get too attached to all those soldiers.
  • Dying Moment of Awesome: Draco performing a Heroic Sacrifice, in order to distract and pin down Medusa so that Perseus can kill her. His Last Words? "Let them know men did this." And then he smiles as Medusa turns him to stone.
  • Eldritch Abomination: The Kraken is an incredibly huge monster older than the entire human race, that sleeps on the bottom of the ocean, it killed the Titans, and even the gods fear it. Plus, there's the fact that its design is rather... alien.
  • Extra Eyes: The Kraken has six eyes.
  • Everybody Hates Hades: Hades is the villain, but has no more malice towards humanity than any of the other gods. He's only doing what he does because he's tired of Zeus' BS, not For the Evulz. He constantly gloats about feeding off of humanity's fear and making them quake in terror of him, while the others consistently speak of wanting humans to love them again. His anger with Zeus is also purely personal, for being stuck with the sucky realm.
  • Everything's Better with Sparkles: Hello, Olympus!
  • Evil Slinks: Medusa, snake woman with an attitude.
  • Eyeless Face: The three Stygian Witches.
  • Eyes Do Not Belong There: The three Stygian Witches' shared eye still has its ocular nerves, which attach in an eye socket in their palm.
  • Eye Spy: The Stygian Witches have to share a single (magical) eye between the three of them. The witch who has it is apparently quite capable of seeing through while it's sitting in her hand.
  • Family-Unfriendly Violence: While the movie does have a PG-13 rating to it, there is a scene where Calibos graphically rips a man in half with his bare hands. And yes, it is shown on the screen with blood splattering. It's over very quickly (probably how the film managed to keep the PG-13), but it does still cause a "Did they just do that?" moment.
  • Fanatical Fire: A rambling preacher burns his own hand in a brazier mid-sermon, showing both his total devotion to the gods and an unstable mind.
  • Fauxshadow: The two hunters who join the group proclaim, "It is death who should fear us!" They are the only surviving members of the group who do not journey to the Underworld.
  • Game Face: Medusa, when using her petrification powers.
  • Genre Throwback: To old Harryhausen movies, obviously.
  • Giggling Villain: Medusa laughs frequently as she battles Perseus' squad.
  • Gods Need Prayer Badly: One of the main points in the war between the gods and man. Zeus and most of the Olympians sustain their immortality through the prayers of humans. This provides a problem when humans not only stop worshiping Olympus, but actively try and starve the gods of badly-needed prayers through blasphemy. As one would expect, it doesn't go well... especially since Hades doesn't need people to pray to him, as he draws power from people's fear of death.
  • Gold and White Are Divine: Zeus' outfit.
  • Go Out with a Smile: When Cynical Mentor Draco aids Perseus in his battle with Medusa, he knowingly sacrifices himself to stall her by impaling her tail with a stalactite. As she turns her petrifying gaze towards him, he calmly tells the hero to tell all that "men did this," before smiling smugly as he is turned to stone.
  • Gorgeous Gorgon: Medusa is a scaly, serpent-tailed thing, but her face is very good looking due to being played by Russian model Natalia Vodianova. However, when she goes to turn men to stone, her entire face changes into something a lot less attractive.
  • Half-Human Hybrid:
    • Perseus is the son of a god and a human woman.
    • Io.
  • Harping on About Harpies: They show up as the flying, devilish minions of Hades. Although they don't resemble bird-women at all, they do serve the purpose of snatching people up and pulling them into the Underworld.
  • Healing Shiv: Sheik Suleiman's blue fire. Except when it's a weapon...
  • Heroic Sacrifice: Suleiman and Draco both die to buy Perseus enough time.
  • Hijacked by Jesus:
    • Hades is a villain who acts as a Satan expy who wishes to overthrow Zeus (God) and unleash "hell on earth" and must be defeated by Perseus, the son of God.. Given that the original myth specifically states that Hades helps Perseus on his quest (giving him the invisibility hat), and that in the fables Hades was perfectly content with his position , and is one of the few Gods who is decent.
    • On the other end, Zeus represents the Abrahamic God. Here, he is the creator of humanity who loves them and wants their love in turn. He is repeatedly merciful such as not outright destroying Calibos and his entire army instead only embarrassing him and has allowed humanity to grow advanced enough that they no longer need the gods for survival. His son, born of a human mother, is the one who has to save humanity from Hades.
  • Hollywood Costuming: The gods are wearing medieval European suits of armor! Contrast with the goddesses, who wear classic Hellenic attire.
  • Home Guard: The Dwindling Party of soldiers assigned to help Perseus in his mission are from an Honor Guard, distinguished soldiers too old to fight on the front lines or young inexperienced soldiers who look good on display. They are all he gets because the rest of the Argosian army had recently been wiped out after picking a fight with Zeus and Hades.
  • Human Sacrifice: Zeus should have just asked for a fruit basket.
  • Improbable Hairstyle: How does Perseus manage to maintain that buzzcut of his while traveling rough for months?
  • It Has Been an Honor: Just before they begin their apparently suicidal quest, Perseus says something akin to this to the companions who chose to remain with him. He remarks that his father was, at least initially, the only great man he knew. Now, he could say he knew four great men. He then directs his attention to Io and the Djinn, amending his statement with: "And one woman. .... and whatever the hell you are."
  • Jerkass Gods: To be expected of the Greek pantheon — with the possible exception of Apollo though in Zeus' case toned down from the myths.
  • Kaiju: The Kraken.
  • Karma Houdini: Zeus. Seriously, he is ultimately behind just about every bad thing that happens in the story, really doesn't suffer at all for his actions, does little to nothing to fix anything, and is even forgiven by Perseus who was calling him out on it for the whole movie.
  • Kill the Cutie: Eusebios, clearly the youngest of the group of heroes, is turned to stone by Medusa after watching his companion die, and his body is then smashed to pieces at Perseus' feet.
  • Kill the God: Various rulers are trying to do this to the Olympians by destroying their temples and denying them worship. While it does weaken them, the gods are still powerful enough to inflict misery on the commonfolk, whose suffering their arrogant rulers ignore. It also doesn't do anything to weaken Hades, since he draws power from their fear of death.
  • Kneel Before Zod: When Hades appears on Earth, he demands that mortals kneel before him.
  • Light Is Not Good: The Gods wear really, really shiny armor.
  • Literally Shattered Lives: Medusa does this to her victims.
  • Lost Aesop: For the first part of the film, the human heroes are preparing to go to war against the gods in revenge for their tyrannical mistreatment, but then about halfway through Zeus realizes what Hades is up to and decides to secretly help Perseus on his quest to defeat him. After Hades is dealt with, the humans declare their Rage Against the Heavens to be over, even though Zeus, who was acting like a prick and preparing to put the mortals in their place before Hades arrived on the scene, receives no comeuppance whatsoever. Is the Aesop supposed to be that powerful people can get away with anything?
  • Made of Explodium: The Djinn Sheik Suleiman, serving as a Heroic Sacrifice to distract Medusa.
  • Made of Iron: The team members who survive the scorpion fight, having got smacked around by the scorpions. Draco and Perseus take this Up to Eleven. Perses while an infant survives being locked in a coffin and thrown into the sea while his mother who was with him died. Justified in his case because he is a demi-god.
  • Magic Skirt: Io's dress follows the trope during the scorpion battle.
  • Mass "Oh, Crap!":
    • When Hades makes his appearance in the throne room scene, it's obvious everyone is thinking Oh, Crap!, especially the queen who had just finished saying that they were the new gods. As if a shadowy black figure materializing in your throne room whilst killing all of your guards wasn't reason enough to have this reaction, Cassiopeia then asks for his name: "I am Hades". Cue Cassiopeia and about half the room looking like they've just soiled themselves.
    • The scene where after a deadly battle with a single giant scorpion, they find themselves surrounded by half a dozen or so giant scorpions. Eep.
    • The arrival of the Kraken.
  • Meaningful Rename: Acrisius changing his name to Calibos after he was turned into a demon by Zeus.
  • Men Are the Expendable Gender: Almost every secondary character dies over the course of the movie but the death of The Chick is a much bigger deal to Perseus; later Zeus brings her back to life, but everyone else stays dead.
  • Mickey Mousing: During the battle with the scorpions, the musical "stings" accompany the scorpions' attacks.
  • More Teeth than the Osmond Family: The Kraken.
  • Mythology Gag:
    • Perseus and his men, with great effort, manage to fight and kill a small number of scorpions, which are roughly as big as the ones from the original movie. Then their bigger brother comes out...
    • Perseus finds a small mechanical owl in a box. "What the hell is this?" The commander simply tells him to put it back in. Probably intended as a Take That! at the 1981 film, for which the owl has been disparaged for being included just to ripoff R2-D2.
  • Nay-Theist: Many characters.
  • Nightmare Face: Medusa's face transforms into something like a demon snake when she petrifies her victims (or in one case, tries to).
  • No Man of Woman Born: Medusa's gaze can turn any creature of flesh into stone. A Djinn, on the other hand...
  • No-Sell: The Djinn is immune to Medusa's gaze because his body is made of rock. When she tries petrify him, he just laughs in her face.
  • Non-Indicative Name: As in the original movie, and despite the advertising tagline, no Titans appear, let alone clash.
  • Not Even Bothering with the Accent: Perseus is played by Sam Worthington, whose Aussie accent remains intact.
  • Obi-Wan Moment: Draco is mortally wounded during the fight with Medusa. Aware his time his short, he uses the last of his strength to stall and weaken her. Confident that Perseus could finish what they started, the normally stern Draco gives the hero a peaceful smile, reminding him to tell all that, "men did this." Medusa then turns him to stone and shatters his body.
  • Off Model: There's a scene where one of the Rock Scorpions is missing part of its tail.
  • Oh, Crap!: Medusa seems to have a double moment of this, first when she finds that her power doesn't work on someone, and then is shown that same one is about to attempt a Taking You with Me.
  • Oh My Gods!: Largely averted, at least with Perseus. Sam Worthington seems fond of saying "What the hell is/was this/that?" instead of "Tartarus" or something along those lines.
  • Older Than They Look: Io.
  • One to Million to One: Hades can teleport by having demon imps fuse into him (and he can de-fuse into said imps).
  • Only Sane Man: Andromeda, who is the only one to realize provoking the gods will have negative consequences.
  • Opt Out: The monster hunters (probably wisely) decide to leave the party just before they head off to fight Medusa.
  • Organic Bra: Medusa.
  • Our Genies Are Different: The Djinn appear as black-colored humanoid creatures with bright blue eyes that use blue fire magic that seems organic based (they tame scorpions, heal the hero and are claimed to rebuild themselves of wood). And they also can suicide bomb themselves.
  • Pegasus: The film goes the "entire species of winged horses" route. Pegasus himself is marked out by being larger and a different color.
  • Plot Hole: The entire plot of the movie hinges on internal contradictions.
    • The gods supposedly need human prayer to survive, yet they predate humanity and even fought a cosmic war with the titans without so much as a single worshiper to empower them.
    • The Kraken is a monster so powerful that even gods and titans could not defeat it. However, the gaze of Medusa's severed head, whose powers were the result of a curse cast on her by Athena in a fit of pique, can instantly turn it into stone. Somehow it never occurred to any of the gods to just make another such monster in order to stop the Kraken, and by extension Hades.
  • Progressively Prettier: You got sexy in my Medusa!
  • Rage Against the Heavens: Aside from Hades, Zeus and many of the other gods are portrayed as being all-around bastards, which is the primary source of the story's conflict. This leads to Perseus spending much of the film trying to act in denial of his divine parentage.
  • Rasputinian Death: Medusa. A magic bomb, pierced by a stalactite, has her head cut off before falling into a lava pit.
  • Red Herring:
    • One of those soldiers sounds exactly like Liam Neeson. Considering Zeus' penchant for disguising himself as a supporting character, you'd think something was going to be made of this... But nope, it's just a normal soldier who happens to sound exactly like Liam Neeson.
    • Poseidon is frequently mentioned in the beginning of the film as being one of the gods to stand up to the titans, the ruler of the sea who (at least in the eyes of Spyros) is responsible for the lack of fish, and the guy who raped Medusa. Yet he shows up as often as the other gods, besides Zeus and Hades. Hell, even Apollo had a bigger role in the film than Poseidon, and Apollo had all of one scene of dialogue.
    • The first group of soldiers that Perseus teams up with. They seem to have at least a little bit of characterization. They survive all the way back to Argos, basically the beginning of the First Act.
  • The Remake: Of Clash of the Titans (1981).
  • Rule of Cool: A lot of the human storylines are dropped to spend more time on Perseus fighting monsters. Which a lot of viewers are perfectly fine with. Oddly, while the monsters are impressively animated, the filmmakers have done relatively little to make them distinctive in contrast to the original. Calibos, for instance, has gone from a deformed half-saytr thing to, well, Two-Face in a tunic.
  • Sadly Mythtaken:
    • The Kraken is from Norse Mythology.
    • Contrary to the reference by one of the Stygian witches, Medusa and the Kraken were not Titans. The Titans were Elder Gods, who were overthrown by a race of younger gods, their descendants, a.k.a., the Olympians.
    • The Gods won the Titanomachy by themselves.
    • Io isn't even from the same myth as Perseus. Io wasn't "cursed with agelessness"; she was a priestess of Argos who was turned into a cow by Zeus to hide her from his jealous wife Hera when she caught the two canoodling (she certainly didn't spurn Zeus' advances).
    • The original myth has Perseus seeking Medusa's head for a completely unrelated reasons to Andromeda's plight. He saves her because he happens to be flying home on Hermes' winged sandals and comes across this poor Virgin Sacrifice strapped to a rock.
    • In Greek mythology Hades was not an adversary of the other gods, just a member of the pantheon that oversaw of an area of concern (the afterlife) that most people would rather not think about. He was even married to his beautiful niece Persephone.
    • Zeus revolted against his father, Cronus and the other Titans, defeated them, and banished them to Tartarus, a dungeon in the Underworld. Hades was not banished. He drew lots with Zeus and Poseidon, for shares of the world. He drew the Underworld, making him also the god of the hidden wealth of the earth, including gold and silver. He was cool with it. The movie also says he was not worshiped and while he was seldom worshiped as Hades (that name mostly refers to his realm) he was often worshiped in Greece under the name Pluton, the god of wealth.
    • About three days into their seven day journey (on foot mind you), they enter a desert and encounter Djinn. While there were deserts in the traditional definition of "Greece", which included Turkey (and also explains the Doric ruins), it still doesn't explain how they got there from the Peloponnese in three days, or why they even got that far off course.
    • One thing weirder about Sheik Suleiman? While the title Sheik and legends of Djinn predate Islam, Suleiman is a very Islamic name for something set in the same vague time period as Mythological Greece. The Roman Empire should cover the Mediterranean and Christianity should be around if Djinn have Muslim names.
    • Mankind was created by a Titan called Prometheus, not Zeus. By some accounts, Zeus delegated the job to brother Titans, Prometheus (the wisest Titan; his name means "forethought") and Epimetheus (the stupidest Titan; his name means "afterthought").
    • Perseus was Acrisius' grandson, not his son.
    • Zeus impregnated Acrisius' daughter by appearing as a shower of golden light, not as her husband. She was never married, due to this wacky prophecy about her son being the one who kills Acrisius (some versions make the murder intentional, others account his death by Perseus pulling out Medusa's head at a dinner party. It makes sense in context). Coincidentally, Hercules (aka Heracles) was the one created by Zeus masquerading as some woman's husband... Still another holds that Perseus entered a discus competition and his discus went astray and killed a spectator.
    • Medusa doesn't live in the Underworld.
    • There was only one Pegasus, not a herd, who sprang forth from Medusa's neck after she was killed. (Indeed, "Pegasus" actually means "he who sprang".) Pegasus was also not ridden by Perseus, but an unrelated hero named Bellerophon.
  • Scary Scorpions: Massive killer scorpions caused by the blood of Calibos, who has been given godly powers by Hades. The scorpions seem to be better at the job than Calibos was. The scorpions kill two Argosian soldiers (as opposed to Calibos's four), but they tend to make more of an impression, being, you know, giant scorpions.
  • Screw Destiny: The three witches predict that Perseus will die in trying to kill the Kraken. And he... doesn't. In fact, it's never mentioned again.
  • Serial Escalation: Just how much bigger can the Kraken get?
  • Shining City: Argos (somewhat). Olympus takes it Up to Eleven.
  • Shout-Out:
    • The super-shiny armor of the Olympians? Apparently, they were modeled after the "cloths" of the Saints of Saint Seiya.
    • The Stygian Witches look like Xenomorphs.
  • Single-Stroke Battle: The fight between Perseus and Medusa where he finishes her with a single Clean Cut.
  • Snake People: Medusa.
  • Snakes Are Sexy: Medusa is half-woman, half-snake, all sexy.
  • Taken for Granite: Medusa's victims
  • Taking You with Me: The Djinn does this to Medusa. It doesn't quite work, but does provide a crucial distraction.
  • That Man Is Dead: "There is no Acrisius. Only Calibos!"
  • Those Two Guys: Those two hunters who tag along with Perseus and the soldiers from Argos. They chicken out when they head to kill Medusa, but show up again, riding one of the Djinn-trained scorpions to help save the day at the end of the film.
  • Throwing Your Sword Always Works: Perseus chucking his Olympian sword at Hades. Thankfully, Zeus helps out with some lightning assistance, otherwise it probably wouldn't have succeeded.
  • 24-Hour Armor: The gods always appear dressed in their super-shiny armor — though gods can presumably wear whatever they want regardless of the occasion.
  • The Unintelligible: The Djinn, sort of. Sheikh Suleiman was speaking Arabic in some scenes, especially when the Djinn saved Perseus and Co. from the scorpions.
  • Was Once a Man: The djinns.
  • Who Wants to Live Forever?: Perseus thinks Io is Cursed with Awesome when she tells him she's cursed with agelessness because she rejected a god's advances (which she didn't do, in the actual myths). Io then tells him the tragic consequences of bearing such a curse: watching her loved ones die while she continues to live, explicitly comparing it to the death of his family when Hades first appeared.
  • Woobie, Destroyer of Worlds: Medusa. Rape victim, cursed by a Goddess of Wisdom for being raped, and sent to the underworld to dwell in squalor. Is it any wonder she spends her time gleefully hunting any man stupid enough to try to kill her?
  • Your Princess Is in Another Castle: "Huzzah! We've set fire to a bunch of temples and knocked over statues of the gods! That'll show 'em! Let's throw a — Oh, hi there, Hades. What are you doing here? Man, this is awkward..."

    Wrath of the Titans 
http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/wrath_of_the_titans.png

  • Abusive Parents: Kronos is easily one of the oldest examples in history/mythology - he ate his children (Hades and Poseidon among others) out of fear of getting dethroned by them if they grew up. No wonder the later Greek pantheon is not overly fond of him.
  • Ain't Too Proud to Beg: Andromeda's friend begs Ares for their lives. Unfortunately, he doesn't care and callously stabs her.
  • Alien Blood:
    • When a Makhai is killed, it bleeds lava.
    • When Perseus jumps the Chimera and stabs its neck, a puff of glowing smoke comes out instead of blood.
  • Antagonistic Offspring: Ares to Zeus, Zeus and Hades to Kronos. For that matter, Perseus still isn't all that thrilled with his dad.
  • Anyone Can Die: The gods can be killed. And some are.
  • Ascended Extra: Given Andromeda spent the remake being Demoted to Extra, seems like she's back in her place.
  • Bash Brothers: Zeus and Hades at full power. Bonus points for them being actual brothers.
  • Big Bad Duumvirate: Hades and Ares.
  • Body Horror: There's the Chimera, a two-headed monster with no skin on its faces and a sentinent tail. A minotaur with a deformed face. Makhai warriors with two bodies joined at the waist. And Kronos, who is a massive titan made of molten magma with fists the size of a village.
  • Breath Weapon: The Chimera can breathe fire, with the horned, rhino-like head vomiting gasoline-like fluid that the fanged, ape-like head ignites with hot embers.
  • Broken Aesop: Same as the first movie, it makes a point of "humanity doesn't need gods". The operative issue here is that gods and demigods are, literally speaking, sacrificing themselves in droves to protect mankind and the only thing standing between mankind and utter annihilation.
  • Cain and Abel: Ares is Cain to Perseus' Abel.
  • The Cameo: Bubo the mechanical owl reappears as a prop in Hephaestus' home.
  • Carry a Big Stick: Ares uses a large mace as one of his weapons.
  • Cessation of Existence: Apparently what happens to the gods when they die. Fear of this is what motivates Hades to side with Kronos rather than fight him.
  • Combat Pragmatist: Perseus has no problems fighting dirty to win. Considering the stakes and who he was fighting, he had to.
  • Cloudcuckoolander:
    • Hephaestus has been alone for so long he talks to a broken mechanical owl (Bubo from the original) as if it were alive and intelligible. Andromeda manages to talk him down with a Whoopi Epiphany Speech.
    • Agenor's speech and mannerisms are also rather loony.
  • Comes Great Responsibility: Uttered almost verbatim in one of the dialogues.
  • Convection Schmonvection: Cronos is a mountain-sized man made of molten rock that apparently does not give off any heat. Notably, in the climax Perseus flies Pegasus down his throat and gets slightly singed for his trouble.
  • Crucified Hero Shot: The chained Zeus.
  • Curb-Stomp Battle: Perseus versus Ares, which is kind of understandable when you're a (relatively) regular demigod fighting the god of war himself. Heck, Ares vs anyone is basically this.
    • Zeus and Hades deliver this to the Makhai while they are delivering one to the greek army.
    • Cronus then delivers one to them.
    • Perseus delivers one to the Minotaur.
  • Cyclops: The group encounters a trio of them in the film.
  • Designated Love Interest: Andromeda.
  • Did You Just Flip Off Cthulhu?: When Ares tries to kill Perseus, the latter's son, Helius, briefly challenges Ares, buying his father time. From the look on Ares face, he was impressed by the boy's bravery.
  • Disney Death: Zeus was dying from his injuries, then Hades appears and resurrects him. But perhaps a subversion, since he shortly dies anyway.
  • The Dragon: Ares served as Hades' dragon until he defected.
  • Dungeon Bypass: Hephaestus creates one, while he builds the Tartarus, since he built it from the outside to the inside and needed an exit for himself.
  • Dynamic Entry: Ares uses one, leaping from another location in the world to the front door of the Labyrinth, using the impact from his landing to knock everyone present into the ground with a shockwave.
  • Eldritch Abomination: Kronos.
  • End of an Age: The era of gods ruling over the universe and human destinies is quickly coming to an end.
  • Everybody Hates Hades: Played straight at first, then subverted in the second half of the film when he makes amends with Zeus, finally putting Everybody Hates Hades to rest, though he's much more sympathetic here than in the prior film, Foreshadowing his eventual Heel–Face Turn.
  • Expy: Kronos looks almost like Perses from God of War III; he also resembles his own depiction in Age of Mythology.
  • Face–Heel Turn: Ares betrays Zeus and sides with Hades. For certain values of "Face" anyway. Being the god of war, he was always kind of a dick.
  • Fantasy-Forbidding Father: Mild case; Perseus discourages his son from dreaming about becoming a god. Considering the kinds of personalities the gods have, he's not entirely without reason.
  • Faux Action Girl: Andromeda may lead an army now, but she loses every fight she gets into (except while teaming up against a Makhai with two of her soldiers). She's much more competent as a strategist than as an actual warrior.
  • Faux Affably Evil: Ares is speaking very softly and in a kind tone to Helius, all the while making him watch his father receive a No-Holds-Barred Beatdown.
  • Forced to Watch: Helius is forced to watch his father receive a No-Holds-Barred Beatdown. Ares actually invoked this trope.
  • For the Evulz: Ares involves Helius as mentioned above for no other reason than this.
  • First Girl Wins: Technically speaking, Andromeda. Whilst Io had apparently been watching Perseus his entire life, she neglected to introduce herself to him until after he'd already met Andromeda. At the end of Wrath, the two apparently begin a relationship (it's implied because of standing Hollywood expectations, but all that actually happens is he grabs her and pulls her in for a surprise kiss when she's talking about battle strategy and there hasn't been a hint of romance between them).
  • Genius Cripple: Hephaestus.
  • Gods Need Prayer Badly: Zeus mentions that prayer is the only thing that keeps the gods immortal towards the beginning of the film.
  • Götterdämmerung: The gods are dying out, but most of them aren't going without a fight.
  • Greater-Scope Villain: Kronos.
  • Guttural Growler: Kronos speaks in an incredibly deep voice, as befits a mythical creature from the advent of time that's well over half a kilometer tall.
  • A Head at Each End: The Chimera's snake-headed tail.
  • Heel–Face Turn: Hades realizes that there's good left in him and saves his brother's life.
  • Heroic Sacrifice:
    • Hephaestus makes one.
    • Zeus as well.
  • The High Queen: Andromeda.
  • Hoist by His Own Petard:
    • The chimera in the first battle. Perseus impales the fuel head which causes it to continuously spew out flammable fluid on itself and the ground, then goads the ignition head into lighting it.
    • Ares brings Perseus's son Helius to the temple he and Perseus were fighting so that the boy could watch him beat Perseus to death. Near the end of battle, Helius distracts Ares for some precious few seconds which Perseus uses to recover, snatch some weapons from Ares's belt and stab him to death with them.
  • Hoist Hero Over Head: Ares does this to one of Andromeda's soldiers with one hand before throwing him far away.
  • Hollywood Tactics: Exactly how fire is supposed to stop the burning Legions of Hell or how a phalanx is going to stop a several-hundred-meters molten deity is left unclear. At the same time it's likely they were hoping that Perseus would be able to defeat Kronos while the Greek army held off the monsters. They did passably well against the Makhai, managing to kill multiple ones.
  • Hybrid Monster: Instead of having a lion head and a goat head, the Chimera has one head resembling a manticore-gorilla and the other one like a deformed rhinoceros.
  • Immortals Fear Death: Hades and Ares join Cronus on the condition they keep their immortality. Gods cease to exist upon death and that thought terrifies them.
  • Impaled with Extreme Prejudice:
    • Ares does this to Andromeda's female friend.
    • While fighting the Greek army in the climax the Makhai are both on the delivering and receiving end.
    • Perseus does this multiple times near the climax to kill Ares.
  • Karma Houdini: Despite having a change of heart by siding with Zeus, ultimately forgiving him, and helping to combat their insane father, Hades is still unpunished for the death's of Perseus' family and thousands of other people. Sure he lost his immortality, but he seems quite alright with his situation.
  • Killed Off for Real: Many of the gods.
  • Kill It with Fire: The Chimera. Sort of a Chekhov's Gun noting on how much they focus on the dual-fire system that was backfired on it.
  • Lady of War: Andromeda, although more as a strategist considering she loses every physical fight she engages in.
  • Large Ham: Hephaestus may not last long but Bill Nighy makes good use of his screen time.
  • Last of His Kind: By the end of the film, there's only one real god left, and even he is no longer immortal.
  • Lightning Bruiser: The Cyclops move at the proportionate speed of humans despite being over forty feet tall. The Makhai are even faster.
  • The Load: Andromeda. Perseus and Agenor do all the work. She loses every fight she gets into and Perseus has to rescue her at least three times. The only thing close to helpful that she does is charm Hephaestus into helping them.
  • A Load of Bull: Perseus fights a Minotaur in the Labyrinth. The Minotaur has a more human, yet deformed, face than the more common bull-headed depiction.
  • Love Redeems: Hades of all people.
  • Made of Iron:
    • Compared to the first movie, Perseus takes a lot of punishment, and it shows on his body, yet it's still much more than a normal human would be able to take — he's a demigod after all.
    • Agenor himself also displays demigod levels of Made of Iron, considering He took a full-force blow from Ares' warhammer with Poseidon's trident not exactly providing the best shield in that situation. He was struck with enough force to knock him into a pillar, which exploded and collapsed upon impact. Despite this, he still managed to walk it off. Hades and Ares fall hundreds of feet and shake it off, especially Ares who is completely unharmed
  • Magma Man: Kronos could be the poster boy of this trope.
  • Missing Mom: Io is dead by the time the events of the sequel take place and is Helius's mother. It never really is properly explained what happened to her.
  • Mobile Maze: The Labyrinth.
  • Mortality Ensues: The level of prayers to the gods has dwindled so much that the gods have lost their immortality and many have died before the movie even started. The gods who are left still have their powers, but they are fading and they are vulnerable to being killed.
  • Multiple Head Case: The Makhai. If you look closely you can see that if one head is killed, the other one still fights.
  • Neck Lift: Ares does this to Hephaestus.
  • No Body Left Behind: When the Gods die, their bodies turn to dust.
  • No-Holds-Barred Beatdown: Ares delivers a brutal one to Perseus near the end of the movie.
  • Non-Indicative Name: Now there are Titans. Only one of them appears, though, so if you're hoping to see Titans clashing you're still going to be disappointed.
  • Offhand Backhand: Ares is so badass, He doesn't have to look behind him when one of the Spartans following Perseus and Andromeda, throws an axe at him, which He deftly catches and throws at his fellow Spartan with enough force to knock the poor bastard into a pillar and crush part of the pillar in the process. He doesn't even look behind him when said Spartan tries to back stab him. He merely turns right as the guy charges, picks him up and throws him like a doll.
  • Orange/Blue Contrast: Kronos' orange versus the Spear of Trium's blue. When the latter touches the former's insides, they even change color from orange to blue shortly before the Titan blows up.
  • Papa Wolf: Pretty much Perseus's entire motivation for the film.
  • Plucky Comic Relief: Agenor.
  • Remember When You Blew Up a Sun?: Perseus is still hailed as a great hero for his victory over the Kraken and is given a salute of honour by Andromeda's army.
  • Rewarded as a Traitor Deserves: Perseus warns everybody not to pray to Ares, since a god can hear and locate anybody who prays to them and Ares is their enemy. Eventually, Korrina gives in to fear and prays to Ares, thinking he will save her. Ares teleports to the heroes' location and starts slaughtering everybody. When Korrina reveals herself as the person who prayed to him, Ares kills her without a second thought.
  • Second Love: Andromeda to Perseus.
  • Shapeshifter Guilt Trip: Perseus fights and defeats a minotaur. As he's about to finish it off, the minotaur suddenly starts talking in his son's voice, begging his "father" not to hurt him. Perseus kills it anyway.
  • Shout-Out:
    • The Chimera's fire breath requires the two heads to work in tandem — one head breathes gas, and the other head lights it.
    • To Tomb of Horrors:
      Hephaestus: This is the entrance to the labyrinth. There are hundreds of doors, all of which would kill you, ha ha... save one. You see, I designed it to play tricks with the mind. After all, the mind is the greatest trap of all.
    • The Makhai look like Olympus Fiends (with two heads) from God of War. Also Cronus looks a lot like the magma titan.
    • The Chimera is a triple Shout Out: The "lion" head resembles a white ape from Disney's John Carter, the "goat" head resembles the reek from Attack of the Clones, and the serpent tail looks like a Xenomorph chestburster.
    • Kronos's appearance as a Magma Man might be one to Age of Mythology (where he looked practically the same).
  • "Shut Up" Kiss: At the end of the film, Andromeda is discussing battle plans when Perseus plants one on her lips mid-sentence.
  • Sudden Sequel Death Syndrome:
    • Io appears only as a tombstone.
    • Poseidon gets just slightly more screentime here before getting killed off.
  • Super Strength:
    • Ares crumples his enemies like they were made out of clay, easily neck-lifting people and throwing them far away with one hand. Hell, being slapped by Ares looks like it hurts a lot. He even knocked Andromeda off her feet by grabbing her sword and jabbing her with the hilt. He threw Hades' trident over 50 feet to impale Zeus. He shoved Perseus through at least three marble pillars casually, and then kicking Perseus hard enough to crack the marble tablets behind him. He can even generate minor shockwaves while hitting someone, presuming they are capable of surviving his blows, even generating shockwaves powerful enough to send people flying when using his warhammer.
    • Zeus and Hades kick the crap out of the Makhai attacking the Unified Greek Army, pummeling these Made of Iron Perpetual Motion Monsters with incredible feats of strength.
    • Perseus is no slouch either, having used iron chains of questionable quality to ensnare the Chimera and restrain it long enough for it to kill itself, temporarily holding his own in a push-off against a 40 feet tall Cyclops who can easily rip apart and punch through trees and one hit kill ordinary humans, punching the super-strong Minotaur's horn off and beating him into unconsciousness with nothing but his bare fists and a tiny rock, smashing the chains holding Zeus into dust using a staff while Andromeda with a sword was able to do nothing, and he and Agenor together hold off a massive literal Advancing Wall of Doom before it crushed them.
    • Agenor sends a guard flying by just shrugging his shoulder and holds off the aforementioned wall by himself for some time.
    • The Makhai toss around the Greek soldiers as if they were pebbles, and the Minotaur does the same to Perseus.
  • Time Skip: It begins ten years after the previous film ends, significantly longer than the actual amount of time that elapsed between their respective releases.
  • Too Dumb to Live:
    • Perseus warns everybody not to pray to Ares, since a god can hear and locate anybody who prays to them and Ares is their enemy. Eventually, Korrina gives in to fear and prays to Ares, thinking he will save her. Ares teleports to the heroes' location and starts slaughtering everybody, including Korrina.
    • It's safe to assume that Kronos recognizes that one and only weapon in the world that can defeat him when he sees it, yet he can think of no better tactic to fight off Perseus on Pegasus-back than opening his giant mouth, thus providing Perseus with a more than convenient way of delivering the Spear of Trium where it needs to be to kill the Titan once and for all.
  • Took a Level in Badass: Andromeda in the first film? Damsel in Distress. Andromeda in the second? Leader of an entire army.
  • The Unfavourite: Ares views himself as this.
  • The Unintelligible: Kronos rambles virtually without pause while he's on screen, but what he actually says remains a complete mystery. Not even the language is discernible, although it's probably some form of ancient Greek.
  • "Well Done, Son!" Guy: Ares betrays Zeus because he loathes that he casts his favor and affection more on Perseus, his mortal half-brother, instead of him.
  • Well-Intentioned Extremist: Hades bargains with Kronos that if he would set him free, Kronos would allow Hades and the surviving Gods to keep their immortality. However, he does so knowing that Kronos will wreak havoc upon the earth and cause untold millions of mortals to die (And possibly lead to their extinction).
  • Would Hit a Girl: Ares attacks Andromeda with murderous intent and callously kills Andromeda's friend when she begs him for their lives.
  • Would Hurt a Child: Ares tries to kill Helius, Perseus's son.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: What happened to the rest of the Greek Pantheon? The Olympian Gods were all seen in the last one, but here only Zeus, Poseidon, Ares, Hades, and Hephaestus appear. It is possible though that the others have already died due to a lack of prayer.
  • Wreathed in Flames: Kronos' body is composed of magma and fire.
  • Wrestler in All of Us: Ares performs a vertical suplex on Perseus during the final showdown, to which Perseus later responds with a sleeper hold.
  • Xenafication: Andromeda is now a Lady of War.

Alternative Title(s): Wrath Of The Titans

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Film/ClashOfTheTitans2010?from=Film.WrathOfTheTitans