Aerith And Bob / Literature

  • Children Of The Rune has this in spades. We have Boris, Mila, Joshua, Chloe, Lucian, Issac—though pronounced It-Chak—and Tichiel, Nayatrei, Lanziee, Isolet, Benya, Maximin, Ispin and Anais.
  • In Gone, we go all the way from Sam to Drake to Astrid to Caine to Zil to Orsay.
    • Lampshaded with Nerezza:
    Turk Weird name
    Nerezza Yes, it is.
  • In John Carter of Mars, Carter's two half-Red Martian children are named Carthoris and… Tara? However, this is justified since Carter wasn't present when Carthoris was hatched.
  • Justified in Kalpa Imperial, as the Vastest Empire that Never Was has thousands of years of existence, each with several cultures, timelines and laguages. The names variate with the years a great deal, and several stories have similar names than modern ones like Bib, but others are like Meabramiddir'Ven.
  • In Jasper Fforde's Thursday Next series, characters have names that are somewhat unusual - Thursday Next herself, her brothers Joffy and Anton, and her children Friday and Tuesday, Archeron Hades, Victor Analogy, Yorrick Kane, etc - or complete puns - Paige Turner, Braxton Hicks, Lamber Thwalts, Landen Park-Laine, etc. The only exceptions are Thursday's other daughter Jenny, and a character in the second book called John Smith. Upon meeting the latter, Thursday comments, "Unusual name."
    Thursday:I was born on a Thursday, hence the name. My brother was born on a Monday and they called him Anton - go figure.
  • Dora Wilk Series has a grand mix of different naming conventions. There are Polish names (Dora, Gajusz, Roman, Anita), foreign-language names (Varg, Joshua, Katia, Olaf), biblical (Baal, Lucifer, Jezebel, Raizel) and some that seem to be completely made up, such as Faoiliarna, Nisim or Laoisie, all mixed together, and nobody seems to notice.
  • Almost every character mentioned in T.S. Hana's The Alchemist series. This includes the main cast of Convent Craven including Axel, Joshil, Ororo, Rega, and Hiroto. However this may be normal due to the residents of the world of Alon being categorized as Inhumans, and almost no one is completely normal.
    • Joshil's wife...Fern.
    • Megiram's real name being...Emma.
    • Most notably Hiroto and his immediate family including father Lionel, mother Vorkuta (Who is written to have a French accent despite sharing the name of a Russian city), older sister Vidine and younger sisters Hope, Hera, and Noelle. What's even worse about Hiroto's out of place name is he is implied to speak with a British accent.
  • Duumvirate is roughly three-fourths Bob, one-fourth Aerith. Howard and William Dominus, Sarah Mortis, Quadrus and Stanley Dominus, Paul Smith, Jeremy Jorgensen, Judas Rockefeller, Hadji Rajadhiraja...
  • The Silverwing series. It's about bats, but the two main characters are Shade and Marina. The villain is named Goth. The child of the first two is named Griffin. Darkwing is even more egregious, naming characters of the same close family Sylph, Dusk, Jib, and Aeolus in prehistoric times.
  • King of the Water Roads has mostly Mesopotamian or Egyptian-ish names, but the main character is named "Garth," due to his foreign grandfather.
  • Inheritance Cycle has characters named Garrow, Eragon, Roran, Helen, Sloan, and Selena all from the same out-of-the-way village. Eragon's name is at least noted as odd (he's named after an elf).
    • This occurs with place names as well-as noted by a reviewer of Brisingr in The Sydney Morning Herald (an Australian newspaper), it was strange to see fantastical names such as Uru'Baen alongside more commonplace names such as Lithgow. Word of God states that this is because of many cultures having inhabited the land and left behind place names.
    • The Eragon Sporkings point out in the dissection of Eragon that most, if not all, of the important people have exotic names. Thus, it would follow that the characters themselves are aware of this, which explains why two protagonists who need to sneak into a city choose ordinary names (by Earth standards) and that their obvious unimportance is why the guards wave them on through when they give their names.
  • A Song of Ice and Fire features a lot of them (the last two kings as of the start of the series are in fact named Aerys and Robert). You get some real modern names (Robert, Jon, Arya, Catelyn, Brandon), some unusual spellyngs of real names (Margaery, Jaime, Eddard), some medieval European names (Cersei, Tywin, Ygritte) ...and then several straight-up fantasy names, (Daenerys, Viserys, Qhorin), which often appear to be assembled from other European languages. Eventually, though, it becomes clear that most of the weirder names just come from cultures outside mainstream Westeros. (If the name contains the letters "ae" or "rys", the bearer is probably Valyrian; if it's short, harsh and vaguely Norse they're from the far north or a Wildling and not a member of House Stark; if it ends with "io" it's from the Free Cities; names with an X in them are usually Summer Islander. etc.)
    • This is a good example because while they are, for the most part, perfectly good (or somewhat unusual, but acceptable) medieval names, they come from all over medieval Europe, which leads to the Lannister family having, among other gems, two parents with medieval English names who have a daughter named Cersei (an late-medieval Italian bastardisation of a Greek name) and two sons named Jaime (an early medieval bastardisation of a Latin bastardisation of a Hebrew name) and Tyrion (a two-language composite name that sounds like Tyron, an acceptable medieval English name). The Seven Kingdoms were formed into a single country three hundred years ago, which might explain why names from different regions have been exchanged.
      • Westeros, while culturally based mostly on England, is a region about the size of South America, and has experienced several waves of colonization, which goes along way toward explaining the diversity.
  • Redwall does this a lot. Contrast the famous warrior "Martin" with his best friend "Gonff". Most characters in the early books were Bobs, and as the setting evolved from more or less real world to completely different world, the names drifted further from Bob and closer to Aeris. In fact, most of the Bobs occurred in Redwall, and the few that are left are mainly holdovers.
  • In Harry Turtledove's Great War cycle of Alternate History novels, a lot of the black characters from the CSA have hifalutin' classical names like Xerxes, Bathsheba, and Cincinattus, apparently as a form of rebellion against the mundanity of life as a third class citizen.
    • This was a naming pattern for slaves in the Real Life Old South: Classical history and occasionally the Bible provided names that were not used by their white masters. Not an alternate element at all.
    • It was also necessary, since slaves weren't allowed to have surnames and needed unique names to distinguish one another.
  • The Bridge of D'Arnath series by Carol Berg has four cultures. One, the mundanes, include such names as Connor, Paulo, and Martin, alongside Seriana and Evard. The other groups get more outlandish as they separate more from the mundanes.
  • In Peter F. Hamilton's The Night's Dawn Trilogy Trilogy, human civilization falls into two main cultures. The Adamists have names that are relatively normal for whatever ethnic group the individual hails from. They have names like Joshua, Ralph, Quinn, and Kelvin (it's Polish). The Edenists, on the other hand, pull names from the deepest, most obscure depths of mythology (or just make shit up). They have names like Syrinx, Sinon, and Eysk. The two groups' respective starships follow a similar trend (Lady Macbeth versus Oenone).
  • Discworld to an extent. Names like Rincewind and Eskarina, which fitted perfectly when the series was a parody of fantasy tropes, have become The Artifact in a series which is far happier with characters called Sam Vimes or Tiffany Aching. Which in itself may be a parody.
    • There are also some weird naming traditions in the Ramtops, giving you names like Yodel Lightly, King My-God-He's-Heavy the First, and Esmerelda Margaret Note Spelling of Lancre.
      • The weird naming traditions aren't limited to Lancre, either; any number of plain old Ankh-Morpork citizens have names like Findthee Swing or Legitimate First. (Can't blame a mother for being proud.)
    • Traditional Omnian names like Smite-the-Unbeliever-With-Cunning-Arguments and Visit-the-Infidel-with-Explanatory-Pamphlets
    • In Interesting Times, the five ruling families of the Agatean empire are the Hongs, the Sungs, the Tangs, the Fangs, and the McSweenys. This is lampshaded twice.
    • Even the nonhumans' naming conventions took a while to get established, with incongruities like dwarfs named Bjorn and Fruntkin, or a troll in Moving Pictures choosing "Rock" as a film pseudonym, despite this being a racist term for his species.
    • One-Man-Bucket and his unfortunate elder brother.
    • Then there's poor Moist, whose name isn't even normal for Discworld, going by the fact that he's heard a lot of jokes about it.
  • In Tolkien's works, specifically The Lord of the Rings, the translation convention is that various 'real' Middle-earth languages are translated to various real-world ones. E.g.: The Westron language (the 'common speech') is translated to English (including names), Rohirric becomes Old English, while the Dwarves get Nordic names. Appendices and supplementary works mention some of the 'real' names that were translated - for example, Frodo Baggins' and Sam Gamgee's 'untranslated Westron' names are Maura Labingi and Banazir Galpsi. According to Tolkien, he invoked the trope to make names from Elvish and other origins feel different from Westron names, to portray the same feeling the hobbits would get when stepping out of the Shire.
    • In a straighter example of this trope, the trolls in The Hobbit are named Tom, Bert, and William. While this can be explained by the story's more whimsical nature, Tolkien also used the names Tom and Bill for other characters in The Lord of the Rings.
  • Spectral Shadows has this literally with the main characters: There's Rael, Jon, and Christine. It also extends to other characters, such as Pamela, Miyan, Kara, Alditha, Salocin, Ra, etc.
  • In the Sword of Truth series, confusingly, characters with mundane Anglo-Saxon names interact with ones with wholly fantasy names. It doesn't seem to follow any particular geographic boundary either, as Anglo-Saxon names crop up in the more fantastic parts of the world as well as in the "mundane" Westlands. In Westland, we have George, Richard, and Michael Cypher, as well as Nadine, Adienote , and Dell Brandstone. From the Midlands, we have Rachel, Violet, Milena, Samuel, Harold, Wyborn, Kahlan Amnell, and Zeddicus Zu'l Zorander. From D'Hara, we have Cara, Gregory, Jennsen, Darken, Panis, Denna, Berdine, Nathan, and Demmin. From the Old World, there's Nicci, Warren, Ann, Jagang, Karg, Sixnote , and Kadar Kardeef. In it's defense, at least the Midlands and the Old World are said to be very culturally diverse.
  • Diana Wynne Jones's last novel The Islands of Chaldea ziggzaggs this trope, using European names that aren't commonly used.
  • Chris Wooding's The Braided Path series has the population of the same country containing people with Japanese-sounding (Kaiku), fantasy style, or European (Lucia) names. Justified: The people of Saramyr descend from foreign settlers: some names are from their original cultures, some names are from the original inhabitants (yeah, most of them where slaughtered, but part of their culture was assimilated), and some are the results of a millennium worth of linguistic and cultural evolution.
  • Harry Potter really falls under the cosmopolitan exception to the trope. Given that wizarding society is a mix of pure bloods, half-bloods and Muggle-borns, naming conventions are understandably varied.
    • Albus Percival Wulfric Brian Dumbledore.
    • William, Charlie, Percy, Fred, George, Ronald, and Ginevra (Ginny). The Author's habit of Theme Naming characters within families often leads to this (such as the Blacks being named after celestial bodies).
    • Crops up again within Harry's family: you have Harry and Ginevra (Ginny) and then their kids, Lily Luna, James Sirius, and... Albus Severus.
    • The wizards in Harry Potter mix with (or avoid) the Muggle world to varying degrees (and didn't officially go undercover until the late 17th century), so it's not entirely surprising to see Bellatrix, Minerva, and Draco alongside Harry, Dean, and Vincent.
    • Nymphadora Tonks, the daughter of Andromeda (Black) Tonks and Ted Tonks. Her middle name, apparently, is Vulpecula. She's a walking lampshade hanging; she only goes by her surname, and when asked why she says that you would too if your fool of a mother named you Nymphadora.
    • The Marauders - James, Peter, Remus and Sirius.
    • The general trend seems to be that the more elitist a wizarding family, the more archaic their names tend to be. The very racist Malfoy family have older, odder names, while the more open Weasley family have relatively ordinary ones. This isn't always consistent (Andromeda Black, despite marrying Muggleborn Ted Tonks, named her daughter Nymphadora, and Pansy Parkinson is as racist as classmate Draco Malfoy), however.
    • Tom Riddle. A perfectly normal name. Short, pronounceable, common. His middle name is Marvolo. This is explained, though. Tom Riddle is named for his Father, who is a Muggle and therefore has a pretty ordinary name. His middle name, Marvolo, is for his Grandfather who was a Wizard, hence the more unusual name. Its owner also considered it rather too common even before he learned his father was a Muggle.
  • In the Uncle series by J. P. Martin, one of the four "Respectable horses" is named Mayhave Crunch. One can speculate that the other three are named Shallhave, Willhave, Canhave or something like that. In the next book it is revealed they are named Ann, Anna, And Annette.
  • Robert Newcomb's Chronicles of Blood and Stone centres on Tristan and his twin sister Shailiha. There is also a man named Faegan with a daughter named Emily. Now, if that were the least of the series' problems...
  • A non-fantasy example: the Chalet School series. On the one hand, there are girls with pretty conventional names, such as Gillian Culver, Beth Chester, Margaret Twiss, Mary Woodley and Amy Stevens. On the other, there's the likes of Verity-Ann Carey, Yseult Pertwee, Loveday Perowne, Viola Lucy, Josette Russell, Zephyr Burthill, Evadne Lannis, and many other girls with equally weird names.
  • In The Fires of Affliction, male characters have names like Khan, Talican, Cylas, Cedric, Arikk, and Shalastan. Female characters include Melissa, Sarah, Elayne, and Lori (the latter of which is technically short for Alorica).
  • The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant have many exotically named characters, but two of the legendary heroes of old were Kevin and Trevor.
  • The Wheel of Time does this a lot. The men tend to have more normal names, while the womens' are feats of imagination and pronunciation. You have Rand, Mat and Perrin, Verin, Elaine, Min and then you have names like Egwene, Egeanin, Nynaeve, Aviendha, Mazrim Taim, and Cadsuane Melhaidrin. There are also some names that sound like they're from our world, but aren't, such as Liandrin, Galina, Amys, Anaiya and Myrelle.
    • Galina is actually a real name of Greek origin that is pretty common in Russia and Bulgaria, but the point stands.
    • Several of the above names are actually alternate forms of names from the Arthurian myths. Nynaeve is an alternate name for Nimue, the lady of the lake.
    • Some are even further connected to Arthurian legend, with Egwene al-Vere being probably a combination of Igraine and Guinevere, Gawyn being Gawain and Artur Hawkwing clearly Arthur.
    • Also Min is a bad example, Min's full name is Elmindreda.
  • The Dune series is all over the place. Many of the main and supporting characters have various real, mostly European names, like Paul, Jessica, Duncan, Vladimir, Piter, Miles, or even ''Marty''. Leto, though unusual, is a real name too. Some characters have given names more similar to current day surnames - i.e. Gurney, Wellington. Then come the characters with the really exotic names : Irulan, Shaddam, Wensicia, Chalice, Tiekyanik, Scytale, Pardot, Moneo, Hwi Noree, Waff, Darwi, etc.
    • The Fremen in the first book mostly have Middle-Eastern sounding names, but there are several exceptions, including a guy with the very English name Geoff. Also, some Fremen names were apparently originally meant to be symbolic, but phonetics drift over the centuries rendered them into completely new forms : A good example is Stilgar himself, who's name was originally something like "Steel Guard". This also extends to the Fremen name for themselves as a people : They originally boasted to be "the Free Men".
      • "The Free Men" is actually a mistranslation of the term Berber ([1]) in keeping with the vaguely Middle Eastern and North African theme.
    • Some of the female names are actually star-related : Irulan is named after a traditional name for a certain star and there's also a star with the traditional Arabic female name of Alia.
  • In The Underland Chronicles, the humans have both typical English names — Henry, Howard, York, Susanna, Judith — and more fantastic names like Solovet, Nerissa, Vikus and Mareth. Lampshaded when Gregor is introduced to – Henry, he almost laughs that "among all these strange names, there's a Henry".
  • Brought up in Christendom - before the collapse of America, British emigrants gave their children Biblical names in the hope of getting a visa more easily. A desire to avoid a glut of Michaels and Benjamins led to kids named Malachi (such as the protagonist) and Hosea running around.
  • Tamora Pierce does this in her Tortal books, partly as a result of more detailed World Building adding more "foreign" names, partly flexing her Fantasy-Sounding Name muscles. A generation with names like Alanna, George, Jonathan, Gary, Alex, etc., grows up and calls its kids Keladry, Nealan, Joren, Lalasa... and among the older generation suddenly appear Wyldon, Turomot, Imrah, Fanche... some of whom have Bob nicknames (Kel, Neal, etc). A lot of these are real medieval names (or variants) that have fallen out of use.
  • All the characters in the Dragonlord Trilogy of Mystara novels by Thorarinn Gunnarsson have fantasy names, except for disguised drake Sir George Kirbey.
  • Shannon Hale's Books Of Bayern do this a lot. Take Anidori-Kiladra Taliana Isilee and her best friend, Enna. The names of characters in Hale's novels are always slightly off, presumably so as to emulate and not copy the cultures she's inspired by (Dashti, Tegus and Saren in Mongolia-inspired Book of a Thousand Days; said names of German-inspired Bayern; Miri, Britta and Gerti in Scandinavia-inspired Princess Academy, etc.)
  • Steven Brust's Dragaera books have these. On the one hand you have names like Morrolan, Loiosh, and Khaavren, while on the other are characters named Vlad, Mario, and Kelly. Most of the more common-sounding names belong to Easterners (i.e. humans), but Mario (a Dragaeran, and the best assassin in the world) is a major exception.
    • It is, however, specifically pointed out that Mario has an Eastern name.
    • Also Loiosh is very close in pronunciation to Lajos which is the Hungarian version of Louis. And as we know Steven Brust is of Hungarian descent.
  • The Star Wars Expanded Universe, even more so than Star Wars itself, is noted for these. In particular books by Timothy Zahn tend to have more 'normal' sounding names for human characters than those by other writers. (In one case, Executive Meddling made him change the names of Han and Leia's children from Jason and Jane to Jacen and Jaina, a case of My Nayme Is More Futurey.)
    • Also, there seems to have been an agreement that because Luke had a normal name, other people from Tatooine would also have normal names (and in the format Luke Nounverber, too).
  • The characters in the Malazan Book of the Fallen series are mostly Only Known by Their Nickname, or have standard random letters mash-up fantasy name. And then the spin-off book Return of the Crimson Guard by Ian Cameron Esselmont introduced a character name Kyle, who, combining this unfortunate name and his characterization as a young tracker with a magical sword, instantly became The Scrappy to a section of the fandom.
  • In the Kiesha'ra series by Amelia Atwater-Rhodes, there are average-sounding names like Zane, Danica, and Irene, and fantasy-sounding names like Betia, Nacola, and Nicias.
  • Main human characters of Artemis Fowl have the given names Artemis, Domovoi, Juliet, and Angeline. Domovoi and Juliet are siblings; Artemis is Angeline's son. Fairy names include Trouble, Mulch, Grub, Briar, Ark, Holly, Opal, Lili, and ... Julius.
    • Trouble was not born Trouble, he took it as his new first name when he was accepted by the police academy. He went on to become a badass member of their equivalent SWAT team. His brother Grub? not so much.
      • My point was actually that nearly all fairy given names are nouns or clearly derived from one, and then there's a fairy called Julius, which isn't a word in English, and comes from a Latin adjective. Trouble Kelp's name being self-chosen doesn't seem to matter, it's remarked on as being excessively macho, but not as unusual per se.
  • Used deliberately in Gor. Voyages of acquisition by the Priest-Kings have occurred off and on for millenia, more normal names are those from people brought over recently.
  • In what may be the earliest example: Sherlock Holmes and his best friend/partner in crime-solving/on-and-off flatmate John Watson. This seems to be trend in their family, as Sherlock's older brother is called Mycroft.
    • Amongst Scotland Yard, take Inspector G. Lestrade (a French name from the Provence) amongst rather normal English/Norman names like Gregson, Jones, Hopkins, Morton and Bradstreet.
  • In the Mortal Engines Quartet, there are "normal" names ranging from Tom and Anna to Wren and Freya, stretching into names like Smew and Oenone. Next to those, there's Gargle and Fishcake vs. Nabisco and Napster - presumably as a sort of Culture Shock and/or nod to the deterioration of origins as Society Marches On.
  • In the novel The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan, one character has four brothers named Matthew, Mark, Luke and Bing. Guess which one dies tragically.
  • In the Wicked Lovely series, most character have unusual names. Sorcha, Aislinn(Pronounced either "Ashley" or "Ashlynn," though), Bananach, Niall, Irial, Beira, Donia, and Siobhan are celtic in origin. Leslie, Gabriel, Ani, Tish, Olivia and Seth are relativley normal names. Then there's the tattoo artist nicknamed Rabbit.
    • Most of the normal names are human: Aislinn is the reincarnated Summer Queen, but the name isn't that uncommon anyways, Seth is fully human until he gets Sorcha to change him, and Leslie is human. Ani and Tish are halflings. Sorcha is one of the classic names for a Queen of the Fey, and Bananach is the personification of war. The others are Fey, and immortal, so this is okay in context
    • Furthermore the first two names listed here also fit into the Celtic naming theme: Aislinn is an Irish name (from which Anglisised names like Ashleyne derive)and Sorcha is likely an Anglicised spelling of 'Saoirse'.
  • Good Omens. Granted, the cast is comprised of both humans and supernatural beings, so it should come as no surprise that the latter get names like Hastur and Metatron. As for the humans, there are names like Adam, Brian, Tracy and Newton on the one hand and Anathema, Warlock, Pippin Galadriel Moonchild and Thou-Shalt-Not-Commit-Adultery on the other. (Yes, you read that last one right). The weirder names are explained and lampshaded. What really fits this trope is the two protagonists - an angel and a demon - who are named, respectively, Aziraphale and Anthony J. Crowley. Crowley's real name is something quite different, and his previous moniker had been "Crawly", seeing as how he was the snake in the Garden of Eden. Yes, that snake.
  • Maledicte has the title character Maledicte or Miranda, and his servant/friend/sidekick Gilly.
  • Justified in Lud-in-the-Mist, where Dorimarites have names ranging from Nathaniel and Hazel to Moonlove and Dreamsweet due to cultural exchange with Fairyland next door.
  • Jim Hawkin's kids in Tennis Shoes Adventure have the following names- Melody, Steffanie, Harrison/Harry...and then little Giddgidonihah Teancum.
  • Twilight Dragon has interesting names like Kether, Kayari, Keaira, Gaignun, and Beldabezabubbabaloo XXVII to contrast with comparatively simpler names like Chris and Monica.
  • Blind Faith by Ben Elton has Caitlin Happymeal. Her name is a compromise between her parents; her father Trafford prefers the more traditional Caitlin, while her mother Chantorria wanted the more socially acceptable Happymeal.
  • Deltora Quest has names like Leif, Barda, Endon, Sharn, Jinks, Ranesh, Glock, Neridah, Gers, Zeean, Lindal, Mikal, Dain, Fallow, Doran, Paff and Prandine mixed with names like Jasmine, Jared, Tom, Steven, Anna, Josef, Marilen, Ava, Jack, Verity, Bess and Kirsten.
    • The Rowan of Rin series is similar. There we have Val, John, Marlie, Hannah, Bree, Sharan, Rowen, Sarah, Allun and Neil mixed with Bronden (a girl,) Lann, Timon, Jiller, Annad, Ellis, Zeel, Perlain, Doss, Asha, Seaborn, Tor, Mithren, Ogden, Norris, Solla and Sheba.
  • Codex Alera has some of these, but its mostly justified since there are various cultures represented. The Alerans (Romans) all have Roman sounding names, with the sole exception of Tavi, the main character. Turns out there's a reason for that.
    • Even looking just at Alerans, though, there's a bit of this, with for example a pair of siblings named Bernard and Isana.
  • The somewhat creepy Mind Screw Children book Latawnya, the Naughty Horse, Learns to Say "No" to Drugs stars the three mare sisters Latawnya, Latoya... and Cindy.
  • The Last Wish, first novel in The Witcher series, sees such interesting names as Geralt of Rivia, Foltest, Segelin, Velerad, Ostrit, Calanthe, Duny, Rinfri, Civril...and Dennis Cranmer, dwarf captain of the guard. Who would have expected the dwarf to have the lame name?
  • The Hussite Trilogy by Andrzej Sapkowski is a quasi-historical trilogy set in XV century Europe, so most characters have medieval European names (quite often of German origin). The name of the main protagonist? Reynevan. Yes, it's only a pseudonym, but his other pseudonyms are rather normal (if a bit punny).
    • Reynevan isn't really that odd, it's just a Polish/Czech variation of his Germanic birth name — Rheinmar. Remember, most of the action takes place in Silesia, which for most of its history was hotly contested between Poland, Bohemia and various German principalities, so having a several variations of one's name in different languages was a perfectly normal practice.
  • 'Tikki-Tikki-Tembo', a 1968 story by Arlene Mosel, has a boy named Tikki tikki tembo-no sa rembo-chari bari ruchi-pip peri pembo and his little brother... Chang.
    • This is a case of purposefully evoking this trope. The moral of the story was that if you give your child a long, crazy name that it'll take a very long time to say, and could possibly get you in hot water if you can't spit it out on time or over and over again.
    • A musical record version renames the younger brother Yen, and also names the numerous elder sisters, starting with eldest Humph, then Lumph, until the youngest sister Gumph, all of whom were named out of spite (just because the parents wanted a son).
  • The Wren series by Sherwood Smith features character names that run from real and unexceptional (Connor and Tess), to real and unique (Wren, Leila, Andreus), to completely invented (Idres, Astren, Nerith).
  • From Reality to Fiction includes names such as Sam, Alex, or Max, to a boy named "956"
  • Three of Andre Norton's early Witch World novels feature the triplets Kyllan, Kemoc and Kaththea - who share the English surname Tregarth. Justified by the fact that their dad was from Earth.
  • Although the original Swedish books (Moomin books were originally written in Swedish but their country of origin is Finland) avert this, there is a rather interesting case in the English translation of The Moomins: the pair of strange visitors Thingumy and Bob (Tofslan and Vifslan in the original).
  • In the Sabrina the Teenage Witch novel Ben There, Done That, the biker gang members are named Wolverine, Chrome, Razor...and Bob.
  • An interesting In-Universe example occurs in Aztec: In Mesoamerican culture, most people tend to be named for concrete objects, warriors, animals, and such. For example: we have protagonist Mixtli (Dark Cloud), warrior Blood Glutton, princess Jadestone Doll, etc. So when Mixtli encounters someone from another village whose name means simply "Always", he's understandably a bit confused.
  • Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal features 8 concubines named Tiny Feet of the Divine Dance of Joyous Orgasm, Beautiful Gate of Heavenly Moisture Number Six, Temptress of the Golden Light of the Harvest Moon, Delicate Personage of Two Fu Dogs Wrestling Under A Blanket, Feminine Keeper of the Three Tunnels of Excessive Friendliness, and Silken Pillows of the Heavenly Softness of Clouds. Played arguably straight with Pea Pods in Duck Sauce with Crispy Noodle, and definitely straight with Sue.
  • The eponymous main character of Septimus Heap has a family with names such as Nicko, Jenna and Simon. One wonders how the Heap parents knew about the meaning of "Septimus".
  • An Exercise in Futility - Kalharians have made-up fantasy names like Kathelm and Meunig, while the Gurdur have Herbrew names such as Ethan and Joseph. One Gurdur tribe names women after virtues, such as Charity.
  • The Hunger Games, where you have names like Katniss, Peeta, Haymitch, Finnick, etc. to names like Effie, Madge, Annie, and Johanna. Some of the more bizarre names go along with Theme Naming though, as people from certain districts tend to be named after certain aspects of their home (ex. people from the luxurious District 1 have names like Glimmer and Gloss, people from the Capitol tend to have Roman names, etc.).
    • The setting is supposed to be in the distant future of North America; Katniss comes from approximately West Virginia coal country. She's named after a plant. Peeta is almost certainly a corruption of Peter.
      • Or Pita, as his parents are bakers.
  • In The Robots of Dawn, Auroran names mentioned are Han, Vasilia, Santirix, Fuad, Maloon, Kelden and Rutilan.
  • Count and Countess. Almost definitely unintentional, but when sharing pagetime with characters named Ferencz, Dorotta, Darvulia, Orsolya, Istvan, Bogdan, Mehmed, and Radu, names like Elizabeth, Frederick, and Christian can appear very jarring.
  • The Orphan's Tales has characters have names with Middle Eastern, Scandinavian, Indian, African, Japanese, Eastern European, Greek, English and many other influences. Bonus points need to be given to Ragnhild and St. Sigrid, two women from Middle Eastern inspired cultures who have Scandinavian-sounding names.
  • The Tale of Peter Rabbit opens: "Once upon a time there were four little Rabbits, and their names were— Flopsy, Mopsy, Cotton-tail, and Peter."
  • Domina
    • The web-novel starts out simple enough. Adam and Derek, Laura and Lizzy, Akane and Ling. There are a few unexpected foreign names like Zusa (Yiddish) and Jelena (Serbian), but they're still real names. Then you start running into people like Malcanthet, the Princess of Killing Sparrow, and Jarasax of the Blood-Doused Hunters.
    • Turns out that the changelings (such as Jarasax) do this intentionally. They are all former slaves of the fey, who never bothered to give them names. Once they escaped, they chose the most outlandish names possible. So we get names like Loga'ha'shanar of the Sky-Borne Lords, Feless of the Firstborn, Heresh'ni of the Velvet Orchids, and Eccretia of the Never-Known Thieves.
  • Lampshaded in-universe in The Barsoom Project, in which most participants in the Fimbulwinter Game use their real names, but one (Marty Bobbick) plays as "Hippogryph". Eviane, a mentally-ill woman convinced the Game's events are really happening, becomes puzzled by his weird name shortly before she recalls that it's all pretend.
  • A Brother's Price is speculative fiction more than fantasy, but here are the names of some of the Whistler children: Jerin, Corelle, Eldest, Pansy, Violet, Kai, Doric, Leia, Blush, Summer, Eva, Kira, Heria, Liam, Emma, Celain, Kettie, Birdie, and Bunny.
    • And the royal family. The princesses have names like Rensellaer, and there is a prince Alannon somewhere in the royal family. But there was also the very tragic figure, an infertile prince consort called ... Michael.
  • In Robert Reed's Great Ship universe, human names get progressively weirder the younger they are. The oldest character has a fairly standard Asian name, Quee Lee. The main characters, who are a mere hundred thousand years old, tend to have more odd names such as Washen or Miocene. The youngest characters have names like "Promise" and "Till"
  • Sister Alice has the older Great Family members having more standard names, such as the first dozen Chamberlains having names like Ian, Alice, and Thomas. Younger characters have odder names, such as Ord, Xo, Ravleen, or Lyman.
  • In Fiona Patton's Tales of the Branion Realm series set in an alternate medieval fantasy Britain … oh, boy.
    • Real names - Robert, David, Alexander, Rosemary, Tanya, Bill
    • Real names with unusual spellings - Evelynne, Warrin, Jonathon, Zavier
    • Real, sometimes obscure names with gender changes - Jordana, Kassander, Gawaina, Amedea, Braniana
    • Real but obscure names, some with unusual spellings - Drusus, Atreus, Agrippa, Dimitrius, Isoldt, Bran
    • Ethnic or ethnic-sounding names, some with unusual spellings - Llewellynne, Rhys, Llewen, Tuedwur, Jock, Arren, Gordon, Duglas, Etienne, Celeste, Henri, Arnolfo, Benedito, Juan-Ernesto, Eleanor, Ferdiad, Mairi, Bridget.
    • Totally-made-up names - Ellisander, Terrilynne, Caliston, Quindara, Galerion, Ballentire, Kelahnus
    • Bird-themed names (denoting Heralds, possibly because they're swift) - Ptarmiganna, Eagleynne, Robinarden, Wrenassandra
  • The Outsiders inverts this with the Curtis siblings: Ponyboy, Sodapop, and Darrel.
  • In the Mediochre Q Seth Series we have Mediochre and Charlotte, Joseph and Dhampinella, the list goes on...
  • Names in The ColSec Trilogy tend to be either singular and weird, or ordinary or slightly unusual given names paired with more-or-less ordinary (if sometimes idiosyncratically spelled) surnames. Of course, it is After the End.
  • The Mexican novel Youth in Sexual Ecstasy has common names for secondary characters, like Jessica and Joanna, also common Spanish names like Luis or José; but the main characters have either Middle-Eastern sounding names like Efrén and Asaf, or outright exotic like Dhamar. And the sequel names the protagonist's daughter as Citlalli, which is an Aztec name.
  • In the Stories of Nypre series we have the usual names like Jordan. Then we have the names that come out of nowhere like Tawarln.
  • The Raven Cycle. The female protagonist's psychic residence has names like Blue, Jimi, Orla, and Neeve alongside Persephone, Calla, and Maura.
  • Border KS features characters named Walter, Ryan, Leah, Antigone, and Siobhan. And Aoife/Morgan/Mab, Niamh/Tania/Titania.
  • In the Shannara series, things often go this way, with either outright normal or at least somewhat plausible names (like Flick and Shea Ohmsford from the first book, or Morgan Leah from the "Scions" sub-series, as well as Walker from the same series, or minor characters named Hunter and Britt in the "Voyage" set) are seen alongside outlandish ones (the eponymous Jerle Shannara, just to start). Many names for both people and places throughout the books often feel like the author ran a dictionary through a shredder and pulled out real or real-ish words and stuck them together (like a swampy region known as the Matted Brakes, alongside truly bizarre names like the Wolfsktaag Mountains or bog-standard ones like the Rainbow Lake). This fits in with the world as established, though, as it is set thousands of years After the End of our earth, specifically in the American Northwest, so it is likely that many English words and names gathered different meanings and were applied to people and geographical features.
  • In the Nantucket Trilogy, Nantucket grows increasingly diverse as Fiernans, Iraiina, and Native Americans move there to seek a better life. It becomes increasingly common to see names like "Llandaurth Witharaxsson", though some of the newcomers do end up taking more "American" names in the hopes that they'll fit in better.
  • Murderess features two parallel worlds, Earth and Greywall’d. Earth is a minor example, where there is a girl named Dakota in an English school (Justified, as she’s American), but Greywall’d absolutely loves this trope, featuring relatively normal first names alongside names comprising legitimate words (translated in the English version) and fantasy names with a vague European sound. Justified again, as Greywall’d is a big place divided into multiple nations and races.
  • Two of the main characters in TheRiddleMasterTrilogy are named Tristan and Morgon. The Big Bad, meanwhile, is named Ghisteslwchlohm.
  • Greg Egan's Orthogonal trilogy features relatively predictable names such as Clara, Tamara, and Ramiro alongside stranger ones like Yalda, Tarquinia, and Eusebio. Of course, the entire thing is presumably fed to the reader through a thick soup of Translation Convention.
  • In Distortionverse we are able to find pretty common names such as Michelle, François, Bertrand, Egon and alongside less common names like Veckert, Vortag, Silman, Emmelyn, Sapphire (and so on). Ah, yes: there are even Dkrav'lest and Andrakta, but they are aliens, so this is partially Justified.
  • In The Red Vixen Adventures the Foxen aliens have such exotic names such as Rolas, Sallivera, Alinadar.... and Melanie. Slightly justified in there being a bit of cultural contamination after meeting Humanity.
  • Lampshaded in The Gods Are Bastards with a drow-human couple whose names actually are Aeris and Bob.
  • T*A*C*K: Holly's pet ping-pong ball, Pongo, once had a brother. Cyrus guesses the name as "Pingo", but it turns it was Sam.
  • Most English dragons in Temeraire have Pretentious Latin Names like Maximus or Perscitia. And then there's Lily, who hatched earlier than expected and who's young nervous captain had to come up with a name on the spot. To a lesser extent, Temeraire himself, who's captain didn't know about the traditional naming scheme and went with that of a captured french warship.
  • The Platinum Key has characters with normal names like Alyson, Lydia and Leila alongside characters with names like Aramincia, Chocolate and Vanilla.
  • In the Hush, Hush series, Angel names range from Patch/Jev to Rixon to Dabria.
  • In Autobiography of Red, the three main characters are named Geryon and Herakles (both from Greek Mythology) and Ancash (a Peruvian place name). But then there are minor characters named Maria and Marguerite.
  • In The Tygrine Cat, cat names are either ordinary names, nouns, or purely made-up. Cats who live close to humans tend to have names more towards the "Bob" end of the spectrum than those who don't but this isn't a hard and fast rule— within the same society, Binjax or Trillion is just as ordinary of a name as Domino, Arabella, or Sparrow.
  • Vampirocracy: Ordinary names like Leon, Liz, and Karl next to archaic and foreign names like Arnbjorg and Joakim. Justified, in that the more uncommon names tend to belong to many-centuries-old vampires.
  • The Ascendant Kingdoms Saga: Names vary from Anglophone (main protagonist Blaine McFadden) to Nordic (the Solveig siblings Tormod and Rinka) to vaguely Slavic (Prokief) to made-up (Kestel Falke, Pentreath Reese, Thrane).
  • Talion: Revenant: Alongside names like Nolan, Marana and Lothar, we have Eric, Hal and Malcolm.
  • The Traitor Son Cycle: Characters from human nations have names borrowed from the cultures their countries are Fantasy Counterpart Cultures of, while the Outwallers and the Wild have their own naming conventions, so on one hand there are people with names like Gabriel, Tom and Alison, and on the other there are, among others, Mogon, Tapio and Nita Qwan.
  • The Crimson Shadow: Ethan, Oliver, Siobhan etc. versus Brind'Amour, Shuglin, Morkney and far more.
  • The Fallocaust series is full of this. Names like Reaver, Sanguine and Sidonius appear side by side with names like Tim, Ellis and Jade. Generally, the more unusual a charater's name is, the more likely they are to be a chimera.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/AerithAndBob/Literature