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Mythology Gag / The Umbrella Academy (2019)

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  • Ben in the comics was stated in diary excerpts to only be doing his hero work to please Reginald and Luther. Then, in the Netflix adaptation, he is vocally uncomfortable about using his abilities and takes no pleasure in their missions.
  • Reginald's monocle becomes an important item in the comics that Five eventually finds, whereas in the Netflix adaptation, it appears to have a mundane significance as a simple corrective lens, since Diego takes it away from Grace early on, without the viewer seeing, and it's brought up again and again.
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  • To stop Vanya, Number Five shot her in the back of the head in the comics. However in the adaptation Allison looks like she's considering shooting her sister in the back of her head, but instead puts the gun near her ear so the sound knocks her out instead.
  • Klaus sitting barefoot on the table in the first episode resembles a pose he does in the comics... although in the comics he does it while levitating.
    • Before he attempts to conjure Reginald in the same episode, Klaus kicks off his shoes—a reference to the comics, where shoes negate his powers.
  • Hargreeves had an article framed in his study about the Academy’s Eiffel Tower job, which was the first mission they went on in the comics.
  • Double as a blink-and-you’ll miss it, there is a Prime-8s’ poster in Diego’s room at the boxing club, alluding to the punk band he and Vanya were in during their teens in the comics.
  • The Swedes masquerading as milkmen in season 2 is based on a throwaway line from the Dallas arc in the comics where Luther accuses Diego of being too paranoid by mocking him with the idea of the milkman being an intergalactic assassin. In the show, the milkmen actually are a threat to reckon with.
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  • In the season two premiere, Allison rumors some soldiers so that their head explodes, the same way she killed Kennedy in the comics.
  • A Freeze-Frame Bonus in season 2 is a blueprint in Reginald's office, which reveals he's been trying to build a televator, one of the Hargreeves' primary method of travel in the comics.
  • Klaus's powers in the comics include levitation. Season 2 appears to show him using them, but it's actually just Ben invisibly holding him up.
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