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One reason this can happen (especially for things more expensive than guns) is that the "right" weapon may not be available, and an incorrect version easier to come by than it would be to make a replica. For example, Chinese AK clones commonly stand in for the real thing in American movies made during the Cold War. An extreme case would be armoured vehicles; there is only one UsefulNotes/WW2-vintage Tiger tank that still runs in the ''entire world'' and leasing a running mock-up from a private collection would be far more expensive than simply using some other tank and hoping the audience doesn't figure it out. This goes even more for ships; before modern CGI, movies were often forced to either use contemporary warships (even with a stratospheric budget, ''Film/PearlHarbor'''s Japanese carrier set was built on the deck of a modern carrier, made obvious by the visible steam catapult runs) or unconvincing models.

Anime and video games have no similar excuse, since they can by definition include anything the artists can draw or render, no matter how hard it might be to acquire a real example. One of the major reasons (aside from RuleOfCool and a desire to include the creator's favorite guns no matter how little sense it makes) is that the designers often are not "gun people" and just copy what they saw in movies.

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One reason this can happen (especially for things more expensive than guns) is that the "right" weapon may not be available, and an incorrect version easier to come by than it would be to make a replica. For example, Chinese AK clones commonly stand in for the real thing in American movies made during the Cold War. An extreme case would be armoured vehicles; there is only one UsefulNotes/WW2-vintage UsefulNotes/WorldWarII-vintage Tiger tank that still runs in the ''entire world'' and leasing a running mock-up from a private collection would be far more expensive than simply using some other tank and hoping the audience doesn't figure it out. This goes even more for ships; before modern CGI, movies were often forced to either use contemporary warships (even with a stratospheric budget, ''Film/PearlHarbor'''s Japanese carrier set was built on the deck of a modern carrier, made obvious by the visible steam catapult runs) or unconvincing models.

Anime and video games have no similar excuse, since they can by definition include anything the artists can draw or render, no matter how hard it might be to acquire a real example. One of the major reasons (aside from RuleOfCool and a desire to include the creator's favorite guns no matter how little sense it makes) is that the designers often are not "gun people" and just copy what they saw in movies.
movies, or - in an effort to make sure what they do include is modeled as accurately as possible - are limited by what props they can get their hands on to use as a reference, often having to go off of more common stand-ins or airsoft guns.


The practice of giving inappropriate firearms to characters or factions in a TV show or movie. They're generally inappropriate because they are either outdated, too modern for the setting, or because the group in question wouldn't have access to them (like Soviet soldiers wielding Uzis).

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The practice of giving inappropriate firearms to characters or factions in a TV show or movie. They're generally inappropriate because they are either outdated, outdated (like modern American soldiers with Tommy guns), too modern for the setting, setting (like a cop in 1965 having a Glock), or because the group in question wouldn't have access to them (like Soviet soldiers wielding Uzis).



** In the ''Literature/HonorHarrington'' novels, Honor notoriously carries one and puts it to great use in the ''40th century'', when more contemporary weapons could easily tear apart a real-word tank. It turns out she's in the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Society_for_Creative_Anachronism SCA]], which by that time practice with gunpowder firearms the same way their modern counterparts practice archery. There are also noted to be several advantages to using a contemporary firearm, such as the fact that the sound of firing one is [[BangBangBANG much more intimidating]] in a universe where people are used to the comparatively quiet "pew pew" of a pulser, and that it's easy to sneak into places because modern weapon scanners search for a power source the M1911 simply doesn't have.

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** In the ''Literature/HonorHarrington'' novels, Honor notoriously carries one and puts it to great use in the ''40th century'', when more contemporary weapons could easily tear apart a real-word tank. It turns out she's in the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Society_for_Creative_Anachronism SCA]], which by that time practice with gunpowder firearms the same way their modern counterparts practice archery. There are also noted to be several advantages to using a contemporary firearm, such as the fact that the sound of firing one is [[BangBangBANG much more intimidating]] in a universe where people are used to the comparatively quiet "pew pew" of a pulser, and that it's easy to sneak into places because modern weapon scanners only search for a power source which a "chemical burner" like the M1911 simply doesn't have.


* ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid2SonsOfLiberty'' has the enemies (Russian mercenaries) carry AN-94 assault rifles as their main weapon. While chronologically correct (the game is set in 2009, the rifle came out in 1993), the AN-94 is a bad case of RareGuns due to a very high cost, low reliability and ergonomics issues; the only users of the rifle are selected counter-terrorism Russian units. Made even weirder by the fact that some enemies use the still uncommon but way easier to obtain AKS-74U, but for some reason ''they're'' the ones in more specific, smaller roles (defense of the cores of the Big Shell). Less impossible but no less strange, if you alert the guards and then hide, the clearing teams they send to find you are armed with the SPAS-12, a weapon of which only 37,000 were made.

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* ''VideoGame/MetalGear''
**
''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid2SonsOfLiberty'' has the enemies (Russian mercenaries) carry AN-94 assault rifles as their main weapon. While chronologically correct (the game is set in 2009, the rifle came out in 1993), the AN-94 is a bad case of RareGuns due to a very high cost, low reliability and ergonomics issues; the only users of the rifle are selected counter-terrorism Russian units. Made even weirder by the fact that some enemies use the still uncommon but way easier to obtain AKS-74U, but for some reason ''they're'' the ones in more specific, smaller roles (defense of the cores of the Big Shell). Less impossible but no less strange, if you alert the guards and then hide, the clearing teams they send to find you are armed with the SPAS-12, a weapon of which only 37,000 were made.made.
** ''VideoGame/MetalGearGhostBabel'' zig-zags this, and partly justifies it by the Gindra Liberation Front securing several high-tech, state-of-the-art weapons thanks to making a lot of money from trafficking drugs and rare metals. The basic handgun is a Five-seveN, an odd pistol to use in central Africa given that its high cost prevented mass-adoption, and the ammo is relatively rare as well since wide adoption of the PDW concept by NATO was stalled. The assault rifle, however, is a Vektor R5, a derivative of the IMI Galil SAR that is manufactured in South Africa and actually is used by several African nations.


** Even the mobile suits' non-beam-firing weapons aren't immune to this. In ''[[Anime/MobileSuitGundam0083StardustMemory Gundam 0083]]'', for instance, the updated Zaku machine gun is essentially parts from the original bolted onto an upscaled AR-15; a technical drawing of it even shows the charging handle repurposed as a magazine release.

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** Even the mobile suits' non-beam-firing weapons aren't immune to this. In ''[[Anime/MobileSuitGundam0083StardustMemory Gundam 0083]]'', for instance, the updated Zaku machine gun is essentially parts the barrel, scope, side-folding grip and magazine from the original machine gun bolted onto the receiver of an upscaled AR-15; a technical drawing of it even shows the charging handle repurposed as a magazine release.



* Odd example in ''Film/{{Goldeneye}}'', this is one of the movies where real AK-74s are shown alongside fake ones (both modified [=AKMs=] or Type 56s as well as rubber props). Bond himself did get a hold of a real AKS-74U. Oddly, Xenia and Trevelyan are seen with fake ones in some scenes. Probably because they don't have enough of the real AK-74 as the movie demands.

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* Odd example in ''Film/{{Goldeneye}}'', this is one of the movies where real AK-74s are shown alongside fake ones (both modified [=AKMs=] or Type 56s as well as rubber props). Bond himself did get a hold of a real AKS-74U. Oddly, Xenia and Trevelyan are seen with fake ones in some scenes. Probably because Likely they don't didn't have enough of the real AK-74 AK-74s as the movie demands. demanded.



* In ''Film/AFewGoodMen'', Kaffee notes that Lt. Colonel Markinson committed suicide with a .45, yet the scene depicting his death clearly shows him shooting himself with a Beretta.
** The dialogue may have been a carryover from the original stage production written before the USMC adopted the Beretta.

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* In ''Film/AFewGoodMen'', Kaffee notes that Lt. Colonel Markinson committed suicide with a .45, yet the scene depicting his death clearly shows him shooting himself with a Beretta.
** The
Beretta; the dialogue may have been was likely [[TheArtifact a carryover from the original stage production production]], which was written before the USMC adopted the Beretta.



* ''Film/TheHurtLocker'' has several scenes with U.S. soldiers wielding original Beretta 92 pistols, the precursor to the 92F/FS (which is used by the U.S. military under the "M9" designation). The DVD commentary reveals that the blank-adapted 92FS prop they intended to use was delayed in customs, and the writer Mark Boal had to go hunting for a replacement locally. He eventually found a Jordanian General who gave the production team an old 92 to use until their own prop could clear customs. Fortunately the two pistols were similar enough to fool most moviegoers.

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* ''Film/TheHurtLocker'' has several scenes with U.S. soldiers wielding original original-model Beretta 92 pistols, the precursor to the 92F/FS (which is 92F and FS which was used by the U.S. military under the "M9" designation).designation. The DVD commentary reveals that the blank-adapted 92FS prop they intended to use was delayed in customs, and the writer Mark Boal had to go hunting for a replacement locally. He eventually found a Jordanian General who gave the production team an old 92 to use until their own prop could clear customs. Fortunately the two pistols were similar enough to fool most moviegoers.



* Most of the guns used by the USDF in ''Alien Outpost'' are dressed up South African Galil copies, which is all well and good. What's odd is one soldier using an [=XM177=], a weapon that went out of production in the 70s, and the German soldier pulling out a Luger P08 (which was already on the way out during World War II).

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* Most of the guns used by the USDF in ''Alien Outpost'' are dressed up South African Galil copies, which is all well and good. What's odd is one soldier using an [=XM177=], a weapon that went out of production in the 70s, '70s, and the German soldier pulling out a Luger P08 (which was already on the way out during World War II).


* Taken UpToEleven in ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps'' which features several anachronistic faults in regards to firearms shown in the game. The FN FAL in particular - commonly known as the "Right Arm of the Free World" for its use by many Western-aligned nations, including every NATO member state except the US and West Germany - is only used, of all people, by ''Vietcong'' and ''Cuban'' soldiers in single player. To the developers' credit, the second example is slightly [[JustifiedTrope justified]], since the specific model of the FAL seen in the game was part of a shipment of about 500 of these firearms, all delivered to the Cuban police. But other parts of the game return to playing this trope straight, since while the Cuban soldiers only appear in the first level of the game it's never explained why ''every other'' Soviet-aligned military present in the game uses the FAL as well (or why half of the Viet Cong soldiers armed with them also have American M203 grenade launchers attached to them); technically, the FAL was also in service as the semi-auto [=L1A1=] Self Loading Rifle with Australian soldiers stationed in Vietnam, so the argument ''could'' be made the ones encountered in Vietcong hands are simply captured rifles. It's somewhat harder to justify the highly anachronistic French FAMAS FELIN Russians occasionally use, except the FAMAS was a Russian staple weapon in ''Modern Warfare 2'' first, so it could again just be a matter of following the leader. Also, both the Soviet special forces seen in the 1968 Kowloon mission and the Vietcong in Huế City use the SPAS-12 shotgun a firearm model from ''Italy'' which was introduced in ''[[AnachronismStew 1982]]''. The turret in the beginning of the Vorkuta level has a mounted American M249 SAW, which was made in 1984, and the player also acquires a hand-held version of the M134 Minigun, which didn't enter service until 1963 (and is also not man-portable, but [[RuleOfCool we can forgive that part]]) and finally escapes the prison on the back of a motorcycle while flip-cocking a Winchester 1887. Several campaign levels also feature the KS-23 shotgun, a 23mm riot gun that while at least actually being a Russian model (despite it like the FAL appearing primarily in Cuban and Vietcong hands - even Mason starts with it in a mission or two set in Vietnam) was not designed until 1971 and on top of that wasn't meant for actual combat use. The closest any of these get to an actual justification is the last part of "Crash Site", where the presence of a single American China Lake grenade launcher (next to a crate full of Soviet [=SVDs=]) in a downed Soviet cargo plane is briefly and weakly {{handwave}}d as "some kind of setup". Somewhere, a firearms enthusiast is drinking themselves to death.

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* Taken UpToEleven in ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps'' which features several anachronistic faults in regards to firearms shown in the game. The FN FAL in particular - commonly known as the "Right Arm of the Free World" for its use by many Western-aligned nations, including every NATO member state except the US and West Germany - is only used, of all people, by ''Vietcong'' and ''Cuban'' soldiers in single player. To the developers' credit, the second example is slightly [[JustifiedTrope justified]], since the specific model of the FAL seen in the game was part of a shipment of about 500 of these firearms, all delivered to the Cuban police. But other parts of the game return to playing this trope straight, since while the Cuban soldiers only appear in the first level of the game it's never explained why ''every other'' Soviet-aligned military present in the game uses the FAL as well (or why half of the Viet Cong soldiers armed with them also have American M203 grenade launchers attached to them); technically, the FAL was also in service as the semi-auto [=L1A1=] Self Loading Rifle with Australian soldiers stationed in Vietnam, so the argument ''could'' be made the ones encountered in Vietcong hands are simply captured rifles. It's somewhat harder to justify the highly anachronistic French FAMAS FELIN Russians occasionally use, except the FAMAS was a Russian staple weapon in ''Modern Warfare 2'' first, so it could again just be a matter of following the leader. Also, both the Soviet special forces seen in the 1968 Kowloon mission and the Vietcong in Huế City use the SPAS-12 shotgun a firearm model from ''Italy'' which was introduced in ''[[AnachronismStew 1982]]''. The turret in the beginning of the Vorkuta level has a mounted American M249 SAW, which was made in 1984, and the player also acquires a hand-held version of the M134 Minigun, which didn't enter service until 1963 (and is also not man-portable, but [[RuleOfCool we can forgive that part]]) and finally escapes the prison on the back of a motorcycle while flip-cocking a Winchester 1887. Several campaign levels also feature the KS-23 shotgun, a 23mm riot gun that while at least actually being a Russian model (despite it like the FAL appearing primarily in Cuban and Vietcong hands - even Mason starts with it in a mission or two set in Vietnam) was not designed until 1971 and on top of that wasn't meant for actual combat use.use - it was a riot gun meant for keeping the peace in prisons. The closest any of these get to an actual justification is the last part of "Crash Site", where the presence of a single American China Lake grenade launcher (next to a crate full of Soviet [=SVDs=]) in a downed Soviet cargo plane is briefly and weakly {{handwave}}d as "some kind of setup". Somewhere, a firearms enthusiast is drinking themselves to death.



** ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOpsII'' doesn't have nearly as many examples, partly since there are only four missions set during the Cold War like in the previous game, but it's still around mostly by way of reusing weapons from the first game for its flashback arsenal, most of which were outdated and replaced by the mid- to late-80s setting. So, for instance, Woods uses an original-model M16 (misidentified as the improved A1) for Operation Just Cause, at a point in time where the military had switched to the [=M16A2=] and a combat scenario where the "Commando" would have made more sense. A particular screamer, however, is from the second flashback level, set during the UsefulNotes/SovietInvasionOfAfghanistan. It would have actually made sense for the game to give some of those mid-80's Soviet troops the RPK-74 used in the first game - instead, they're given the old belt-fed RPD machine guns the RPK-74 replaced in the real world. Worse, that RPD model [[PropRecycling is lifted directly from]] ''Modern Warfare 2'', complete with a Picatinny rail over the feed tray that shouldn't exist for another nine years at that point (and which Russian military guns in general didn't start using until another decade or so later). The player also has the option of invoking this with the singleplayer version of Create-a-Class; nothing is preventing them from [[BreakOutTheMuseumPiece taking an '80s gun they like into]] the [[TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture 2025 levels]], for instance using that old M16 when the standard JSOC rifles seem to be the [=HK416=] and a slightly dressed-up [=XM8=]... or, after completing the game, [[AnachronismStew doing the opposite]] and, say, fighting a battle in the Angolan Civil War with the KRISS KARD pistol (still not in production even years after the game came out) and a completely fictional weapon like the [[ArmorPiercingAttack cover-penetrating]], [[XRayVision x-ray-scoped]] "Storm PSR".

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** ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOpsII'' doesn't have nearly as many examples, partly since there are only four missions set during the Cold War like in the previous game, but it's still around mostly by way of reusing weapons from the first game for its flashback arsenal, most of which were outdated and replaced by the mid- to late-80s setting. So, for instance, Woods uses an original-model M16 (misidentified as the improved A1) for Operation Just Cause, at a point in time where the military had switched to the [=M16A2=] and a combat scenario where the "Commando" - a CAR-15 - would have made more sense. A particular screamer, however, is from the second flashback level, set during the UsefulNotes/SovietInvasionOfAfghanistan. It would have actually made sense for the game to give some of those mid-80's Soviet troops the RPK-74 used in the first game - instead, they're given the old belt-fed RPD machine guns the RPK-74 replaced in the real world. Worse, that RPD model [[PropRecycling is lifted directly from]] ''Modern Warfare 2'', complete with a Picatinny rail over the feed tray that shouldn't exist for another nine years at that point (and which Russian military guns in general didn't start using until another decade or so later). after that). The player also has the option of invoking this with the singleplayer version of Create-a-Class; nothing is preventing them from [[BreakOutTheMuseumPiece [[OlderIsBetter taking an '80s gun they like into]] the [[TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture 2025 levels]], for instance using that old M16 when the standard JSOC rifles seem to be the [=HK416=] and a slightly dressed-up [=XM8=]... or, after completing the game, [[AnachronismStew doing the opposite]] and, say, fighting a battle in the Angolan Civil War with the KRISS KARD pistol (still not in production even years after the game came out) and a completely fictional weapon like the [[ArmorPiercingAttack cover-penetrating]], [[XRayVision x-ray-scoped]] "Storm PSR".



* ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyWWII'': German soldiers in Normandy using Soviet-made [=PPSh=]-41s and SVT-40s. Actually not that ridiculous an example, as [[https://ww2militaria.files.wordpress.com/2011/12/ppsh_germanforces.jpg the Germans in the real life war]] were rather fond of these Soviet weapons and often kept them as war trophies, even having [=PPShs=] rechambered to fire the German 9mm round and designated MP-41(r), while the SVT-40s saw widespread use as the Germans lacked a worthwhile self-loading rifle until Walther used the captured weapon as inspiration for the G43. Still, Germans using captured Russian weapons in such numbers ''outside'' of Russia stretches belief.

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* ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyWWII'': German soldiers in Normandy using Soviet-made [=PPSh=]-41s and SVT-40s. Actually not that ridiculous an example, as [[https://ww2militaria.files.wordpress.com/2011/12/ppsh_germanforces.jpg the Germans in the real life war]] were rather fond of these Soviet weapons and often kept them as war trophies, even having [=PPShs=] rechambered to fire the German 9mm round and designated MP-41(r), while the SVT-40s saw widespread use as the Germans lacked a worthwhile self-loading rifle until Walther used the captured weapon as inspiration for the G43. Still, Germans using captured Russian Soviet weapons in such numbers ''outside'' of Russia the Eastern Front stretches belief.


* ''Manga/GunslingerGirl'' is an heavy offender, with Marco's Steyr GB pistol, Henrietta's Walther WA 2000 sniper rifle and Triela's Winchester Model 1897 trench gun being quite improper for an assassination team sponsored by the Italian government (and most of them doubling as RareGuns to boot). Henrietta's WA 2000 is the only one of those that's appropriate ''at all'' for an assassin, except that [[RareGuns no assassin is likely to have access to them because they're all in private collections]], while Triela's shotgun gets a pass on being a somewhat diffuse war residuate and a personal choice of hers (they ''have'' tried to make her switch to something else, but she refuses).
** Abverted by Petra's SITES Spectre submachine gun: while also a rare gun it's ''exactly'' the appropriate weapon, being actual Italian special forces hardware used to bring instant firepower at close range.

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* ''Manga/GunslingerGirl'' is an heavy offender, with Marco's Steyr GB pistol, Henrietta's Walther WA 2000 sniper rifle and Triela's Winchester Model 1897 trench gun being quite improper for an assassination team sponsored by the Italian government (and most of them doubling as RareGuns to boot). Henrietta's WA 2000 is the only one of those that's appropriate ''at all'' for an assassin, except that [[RareGuns no assassin is likely to have access to them because [[RareGuns there's less than 200 of them and they're all in private collections]], while Triela's shotgun gets a pass on being a somewhat diffuse war residuate and a personal choice of hers (they ''have'' tried to make her switch to something else, but she refuses).
** Abverted Averted by Petra's SITES Spectre submachine gun: while also a rare gun gun, it's ''exactly'' the appropriate weapon, being actual Italian special forces hardware used to bring instant firepower at close range.



** There's also the fact that some of the bad guys use a ''Welrod'' of all things; while an effective silenced pistol has its uses[[note]]Despite being made during the Second World War, there are rumors that Welrods are still being produced and built ''today'' for British Special Forces[[/note]] it isn't exactly the best idea to get into a live gunfight with a ''bolt-action pistol.''

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** There's also the fact that some of the bad guys use a ''Welrod'' of all things; while an effective silenced pistol has its uses[[note]]Despite being made during the Second World War, War II, there are rumors that Welrods are still being produced and built ''today'' for British Special Forces[[/note]] it isn't exactly the best idea to get into a live gunfight with a ''bolt-action pistol.''



** Bear in mind that the gun props in ''Aliens'' look suitably futuristic enough that they actually avert this trope for anyone who's not a firearms expert. The [=M41A=] has become iconic in its own right, used as the basis for numerous other sci-fi future guns despite the actual firing parts made up of a Thompson SMG (retired in 1971) and a Remington 870 (first entering production in 1951). The various other rifles on the weapon racks are not really intended to be paid attention to - they're just to show that the ''Sulaco'' has a lot of guns on board.
* Odd example in ''Film/{{Goldeneye}}'', this is one of the movies where real AK-74s are shown alongside fake ones (Both modified AKM or Type 56 like the Rambo examples as well as rubber props). Bond himself did get a hold of a real AKS-74U. Oddly, Xenia and Trevelyan is seen with fake ones in some scenes. Probably because they don't have enough of the real AK-74 as the movie demands.

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** Bear in mind that the gun props in ''Aliens'' look suitably futuristic enough that they actually avert this trope for anyone who's not a firearms expert. The [=M41A=] has become iconic in its own right, used as the basis for numerous other sci-fi future guns despite the actual firing parts made up of a Thompson SMG (retired in 1971) and a Remington 870 (first entering production in 1951).1951), with the most modern part being the shell of a SPAS-12 (first produced 1982) around the 870. The various other rifles on the weapon racks are not really intended to be paid attention to - they're just to show that the ''Sulaco'' has a lot of guns on board.
* Odd example in ''Film/{{Goldeneye}}'', this is one of the movies where real AK-74s are shown alongside fake ones (Both (both modified AKM [=AKMs=] or Type 56 like the Rambo examples 56s as well as rubber props). Bond himself did get a hold of a real AKS-74U. Oddly, Xenia and Trevelyan is are seen with fake ones in some scenes. Probably because they don't have enough of the real AK-74 as the movie demands.



** The main weapon of the German soldiers is the MP 40, despite the movie taking place in 1936. The MP 40 was the MP 38 slightly redesigned to be cheaper to manufacture and a little safer to carry, and the two are visually nearly identical, but still falls 2 years too short(there ''was'' a little-known prototype version of the MP 38, the MP 36, which bore a superficial resemblance to the later weapon but it had a wooden body, a slightly tilted magazine housing and was produced in very small numbers). Of course, as the Germans were collecting paranormal technology, they obviously must have gotten a hold of a short duration time-machine.
** Some German officers are armed with Walther P38 pistols, which would not be produced until 1938; only hammerless prototypes of the gun existed in '36, which probably wouldn't be in the hands of any soldiers.

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** The main weapon of the German soldiers is the MP 40, despite the movie taking place in 1936. The MP 40 was the MP 38 slightly redesigned to be cheaper to manufacture and a little safer to carry, and the two are visually nearly identical, but still falls 2 years too short(there short (there ''was'' a little-known prototype version of the MP 38, the MP 36, which bore a superficial resemblance to the later weapon but it had a wooden body, a slightly tilted magazine housing and was produced in very small numbers). Of course, as the Germans were collecting paranormal technology, they obviously must have gotten a hold of acquired a short duration time-machine.
** Some German officers are armed with Walther P38 pistols, which would not be produced until 1938; only hammerless prototypes of the gun existed in '36, which probably wouldn't be in the hands of any regular soldiers.



** Another, smaller goof, is that Indy is at one point seen with an Inglis Hi-Power, a Canadian variation of Browning's design that didn't begin production until 1944. Even having the original FN Hi-Power, like he does in the bar shootout,[[note]]Indy was originally envisioned as having the Colt 1911 for at least this scene, but as above, since 9mm blanks were more reliable they went with the Hi-Power instead[[/note]] would have been a stretch, since it would have only been in production for a year at best at the time of the film. Moreover, the initial sales were almost all for military contracts ''and'' FN had an agreement with Colt at the time to not sell its guns in the United States. So Indy would've needed to meet up with an FN sales agent in Europe and special-order the pistol.
* Justified in ''Lifepod'' (the sci-fi remake of Creator/AlfredHitchcock's ''Lifeboat'') where one character is carrying a 20th century revolver because it will get through spaceport detectors that will pick up contemporary energy weapons.

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** Another, smaller goof, goof is that Indy is at one point seen with an Inglis Hi-Power, a Canadian variation of Browning's design that didn't begin production until 1944. Even having the original FN Hi-Power, like he does in the bar shootout,[[note]]Indy was originally envisioned as having the Colt 1911 for at least this scene, but as above, since 9mm blanks were more reliable they went with the Hi-Power instead[[/note]] would have been a stretch, since it would have only been in production for a year at best at the time of the film. Moreover, the initial sales were almost all for military contracts ''and'' FN had an agreement with Colt at the time to not sell its guns in the United States. So Indy would've needed to meet up with an FN sales agent in Europe and special-order the pistol.
* Justified in ''Lifepod'' (the sci-fi remake of Creator/AlfredHitchcock's ''Lifeboat'') where one character is carrying a 20th century revolver because it will get through spaceport detectors that will pick up are looking for contemporary energy weapons.



*** Then again, all these new weapons are possibly justifiable -- by this point, Russia has a new government, so it's possible they decided to revamp their military arsenal. And since evidence in-game points to them having been looking for an excuse to attack America, switching over to an arsenal using the same ammo as theirs makes some sense.

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*** Then again, all these new weapons are possibly justifiable -- by this point, Russia has a new government, so it's possible they decided to revamp their military arsenal. And since evidence in-game points to them having been looking for an excuse to attack America, America before Makarov gave them one, switching over to an arsenal using the same ammo as theirs makes some sense.



* ''Modern Warfare 3'' adds a Russian machine gun that's actually in use by modern Russian forces (the PKP Pecheneg - ignoring, of course, that it's meant primarily for mounted usage), but otherwise goes all-out with this trope: the new Russian military sidearm is the [[RareGuns never-produced MP412 REX]] while FSO agents use the US Government model of the FN Five-seveN, African militia favor the (conceptual) ''Peruvian'' FAD assault rifle, a flashback to Zakhaev's assassination attempt now includes [[AnachronismStew a few Remington RSASS rifles]] which [[UnreliableNarrator weren't there the first time around]], and multiplayer allows the use of both the Chinese QBZ-97 assault rifle and the Japanese PM-9 machine pistol, despite neither the PLA nor the JSDF being present anywhere in the game. For added hilarity, the aforementioned QBZ-97 (misidentified as the earlier -95), as a bullpup assault rifle that fires in bursts, serves as a SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute for the second game's FAMAS - despite that the GIGN are playable in multiplayer and appear in one campaign level, thus meaning it would make perfect sense for the FAMAS to return.
* Taken UpToEleven in ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps'' which features several anachronistic faults in regards to firearms shown in the game. The FN FAL in particular - commonly known as the "Right Arm of the Free World" for its use by many Western-aligned nations, including every NATO member state except the US and West Germany - is only used, of all people, by ''Vietcong'' and ''Cuban'' soldiers in single player. To the developers' credit, the second example is slightly [[JustifiedTrope justified]], since the specific model of the FAL seen in the game was part of a shipment of about 500 of these firearms, all delivered to the Cuban police. But other parts of the game return to playing this trope straight, since while the Cuban soldiers only appear in the first level of the game it's never explained why ''every other'' Soviet-aligned military present in the game uses the FAL as well (or why half of the Viet Cong soldiers armed with them also have American M203 grenade launchers attached to them); technically, the FAL was also in service as the semi-auto [=L1A1=] Self Loading Rifle with Australian soldiers stationed in Vietnam, so the argument ''could'' be made the ones encountered in Vietcong hands are simply captured rifles. It's somewhat harder to justify the highly anachronistic French FAMAS FELIN Russians occasionally use, except the FAMAS was a Russian staple weapon in ''Modern Warfare 2'' first, so it could again just be a matter of following the leader. Also, both the Soviet special forces seen in the 1968 Kowloon mission and the Vietcong in Huế City use the SPAS-12 shotgun a firearm model from ''Italy'' which was introduced in ''[[AnachronismStew 1982]]''. The turret in the beginning of Vorkuta prison has a mounted American M249 SAW, which was made in 1984, and the player also acquires a hand-held version of the M134 Minigun, which didn't enter service until 1963 (and is also not man-portable, but [[RuleOfCool we can forgive that part]]). Several campaign levels also feature the KS-23 shotgun, a 23mm riot gun that while at least actually being a Russian model (despite it like the FAL appearing primarily in Cuban and Vietcong hands - even Mason starts with it in a mission or two set in Vietnam) was not designed until 1971 and on top of that wasn't meant for actual combat use. The closest any of these get to an actual justification is the last part of "Crash Site", where the presence of a single American China Lake grenade launcher (next to a crate full of Soviet [=SVDs=]) in a downed Soviet cargo plane is briefly and weakly {{handwave}}d as "some kind of setup". Somewhere, a firearms enthusiast is drinking themselves to death.

to:

* ''Modern Warfare 3'' adds a Russian machine gun that's actually in use by modern Russian forces (the PKP Pecheneg - ignoring, of course, that it's meant primarily for mounted usage), but otherwise goes all-out with this trope: the new Russian military sidearm is the [[RareGuns never-produced MP412 REX]] never-produced]] (and intended for sales to ''American'' civilians) [=MP412=] REX while FSO agents use the US Government model of the FN Five-seveN, African militia favor the (conceptual) ''Peruvian'' FAD assault rifle, a flashback to Zakhaev's assassination attempt now includes [[AnachronismStew a few Remington RSASS rifles]] which [[UnreliableNarrator weren't there the first time around]], and multiplayer allows the use of both the Chinese QBZ-97 assault rifle and the Japanese PM-9 machine pistol, despite neither the PLA nor the JSDF being present anywhere in the game. For added hilarity, the aforementioned QBZ-97 (misidentified as the earlier -95), as a bullpup assault rifle that fires in bursts, serves as a SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute for the second game's FAMAS - despite that the GIGN are playable in multiplayer and appear in one campaign level, thus meaning it would make perfect sense for the FAMAS to return.
* Taken UpToEleven in ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps'' which features several anachronistic faults in regards to firearms shown in the game. The FN FAL in particular - commonly known as the "Right Arm of the Free World" for its use by many Western-aligned nations, including every NATO member state except the US and West Germany - is only used, of all people, by ''Vietcong'' and ''Cuban'' soldiers in single player. To the developers' credit, the second example is slightly [[JustifiedTrope justified]], since the specific model of the FAL seen in the game was part of a shipment of about 500 of these firearms, all delivered to the Cuban police. But other parts of the game return to playing this trope straight, since while the Cuban soldiers only appear in the first level of the game it's never explained why ''every other'' Soviet-aligned military present in the game uses the FAL as well (or why half of the Viet Cong soldiers armed with them also have American M203 grenade launchers attached to them); technically, the FAL was also in service as the semi-auto [=L1A1=] Self Loading Rifle with Australian soldiers stationed in Vietnam, so the argument ''could'' be made the ones encountered in Vietcong hands are simply captured rifles. It's somewhat harder to justify the highly anachronistic French FAMAS FELIN Russians occasionally use, except the FAMAS was a Russian staple weapon in ''Modern Warfare 2'' first, so it could again just be a matter of following the leader. Also, both the Soviet special forces seen in the 1968 Kowloon mission and the Vietcong in Huế City use the SPAS-12 shotgun a firearm model from ''Italy'' which was introduced in ''[[AnachronismStew 1982]]''. The turret in the beginning of the Vorkuta prison level has a mounted American M249 SAW, which was made in 1984, and the player also acquires a hand-held version of the M134 Minigun, which didn't enter service until 1963 (and is also not man-portable, but [[RuleOfCool we can forgive that part]]).part]]) and finally escapes the prison on the back of a motorcycle while flip-cocking a Winchester 1887. Several campaign levels also feature the KS-23 shotgun, a 23mm riot gun that while at least actually being a Russian model (despite it like the FAL appearing primarily in Cuban and Vietcong hands - even Mason starts with it in a mission or two set in Vietnam) was not designed until 1971 and on top of that wasn't meant for actual combat use. The closest any of these get to an actual justification is the last part of "Crash Site", where the presence of a single American China Lake grenade launcher (next to a crate full of Soviet [=SVDs=]) in a downed Soviet cargo plane is briefly and weakly {{handwave}}d as "some kind of setup". Somewhere, a firearms enthusiast is drinking themselves to death.


* There are so many M3 Grease Guns and Stens captured by the People's Liberation Army in the Chinese civil war and the UsefulNotes/KoreanWar, it's hard to not film a war show in China without them. Cue dozens of anachronistic shows with M3s appearing before WWII. For really low-budget shows, it is possible for a Type 56 AK to appear in Imperial Japan hands. It's also common for the Type 54 (a copy of the Tokarev TT-33) or Type 64 (Walther PPK) to stand in for other pistols.

to:

* There are so many M3 Grease Guns and Stens captured by the People's Liberation Army in the Chinese civil war and the UsefulNotes/KoreanWar, it's hard to not film a hardly any war show in China is filmed without them. Cue dozens of anachronistic shows with M3s appearing before WWII. For really low-budget shows, it is possible for a Type 56 AK to appear in Imperial Japan hands. It's also common for the Type 54 (a copy of the Tokarev TT-33) or Type 64 (Walther PPK) to stand in for other pistols.



* ''Anime/CowboyBebop'' is set in a future with space gates, large spaceships and advanced almost-sentient computers, yet every personal weapon seen is either very similar or exactly identical to present-day ones. Spike himself uses a Jericho 941 (entered production in 1990), Jet a Walther P99 (1997) and Faye a Glock 30 (also 1997). The anime tries to convey the idea that it's set in a somewhat realistic and retro future, so it makes sense that there are no blasters and that energy weapons are few and far between and too large for anything other than ship-based mountings (though it's never explained why Spike has a plasma cannon on his Swordfish II, when even police fighters are restricted to machine guns). You'd think personal firearms would have evolved at least ''a little''. Plenty of the weapons shown in the series were out of date even when it first started in 1998. But then again, everything in ''Cowboy Bebop'' is retro.

to:

* ''Anime/CowboyBebop'' is set in a future with space gates, large spaceships and advanced almost-sentient computers, yet every personal weapon seen is either very similar or exactly identical to present-day ones. Spike himself uses a Jericho 941 (entered production in 1990), Jet a Walther P99 (1997) and Faye a Glock 30 (also 1997). The anime tries to convey the idea that it's set in a somewhat realistic and retro future, so it makes sense that there are no blasters and that energy weapons are few and far between and too large for anything other than ship-based mountings (though it's never explained why Spike has a plasma cannon on his Swordfish II, when even police fighters are restricted to machine guns). You'd think personal firearms would have evolved at least ''a little''. Plenty of the weapons shown in the series were out of date even when it first started in 1998. But then again, everything in ''Cowboy Bebop'' is retro.retro, and the setting is semi-post-apocalyptic, so it may be supposed that the development of firearms stalled while humanity expanded into space.



** Something else to note is that the series is a sort of semi-dystopian/post apocalypse setting, where a technological incident blew up the moon and turned a large section of Earth into barely-habitable wastelands that are still getting hit by meteor fragments fifty years onward. Even when the story picks up, humanity still seems to be recovering from the incident, which also owes to the series's mix of sci-fi and grungy retro aesthetics since in some cases old is literally mixing with the new. It wouldn't be too much of a stretch to think that personal weapons development wasn't at the priority of humanity's to-do list in the years following the incident.



* ''Anime/{{Noir}}'' both subverts this and plays it straight. Of the main characters, Mirielle uses a modern Walther P99, which subverts this. This trope is played straight with Kirika's Beretta Md. 1934. Instead of giving her the more widely available Walther PPK (which uses the same cartridge and is almost exactly the same size), the production staff deliberately gave her an out-of-production World War 2 vintage pistol because they didn't want to give her "the James Bond gun".

to:

* ''Anime/{{Noir}}'' both subverts this and plays it straight. Of the main characters, gives Mirielle uses a modern Walther P99, which subverts averts this. This trope is played straight with Kirika's Beretta Md. 1934. Instead of giving her the more widely available Walther PPK (which uses the same cartridge and is almost exactly the same size), the production staff deliberately gave her an out-of-production World War 2 vintage pistol because they didn't want to give her "the James Bond gun".



** Subverted by Petra's SITES Spectre submachine gun: while also a rare gun it's ''exactly'' the appropriate weapon, being actual Italian special forces hardware used to bring instant firepower at close range.

to:

** Subverted Abverted by Petra's SITES Spectre submachine gun: while also a rare gun it's ''exactly'' the appropriate weapon, being actual Italian special forces hardware used to bring instant firepower at close range.


* Played straight and subverted in ''Anime/AngelBeats''. The characters use realistic guns, which operate as one would expect guns to, but they're supposed to be in high school. However, it turns out they're actually in a sort of Purgatory, and said weapons can be created and used, so long as the engineers who created them also knew how the thing worked. Which is hilariously subverted in episode 2 when they pull out a gigantic cannon to use against Angel, and the entire thing blows up in their face since none of them knew the mechanics of an artillery gun. Note though that, mechanically, that cannon is actually ''much simpler'' than many of the RareGuns that appear in the hands of characters.

to:

* Played straight and subverted in ''Anime/AngelBeats''. The characters use ''Anime/AngelBeats'', with a group of high schoolers using realistic guns, which operate as one would expect guns to, but they're supposed to be in high school. However, it turns out they're actually in detailed fashion. Justified by the setting being a sort of Purgatory, and said Purgatory where those who know about these weapons can be created and used, so long as the engineers who created them also knew how the thing worked.re-create them. Which is hilariously subverted in episode 2 when they pull out a gigantic cannon to use against Angel, and the entire thing blows up in their face since none of them knew the mechanics of an artillery gun. Note though that, mechanically, that cannon is actually ''much simpler'' than many of the RareGuns that appear in the hands of characters.


[[caption-width-right:350:Parry this, you filthy casual![[note]]And yes knights did use guns, just not any of this vintage[[/note]]]]

to:

[[caption-width-right:350:Parry this, you filthy casual![[note]]And yes yes, knights did ''did'' use guns, guns - just not any of this vintage[[/note]]]]ones from 1942.[[/note]]]]

Added DiffLines:

[[quoteright:350:https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/tumblr_inline_pb4ad40if21r4iznv_500.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:350:Parry this, you filthy casual![[note]]And yes knights did use guns, just not any of this vintage[[/note]]]]


* Taken UpToEleven in ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps'' which features several anachronistic faults in regards to firearms shown in the game. The FN FAL in particular - commonly known as the "Right Arm of the Free World" for its use by many Western-aligned nations, including every NATO member state except the US and West Germany - is only used, of all people, by ''Vietcong'' and ''Cuban'' soldiers in single player. To the developers' credit, the second example is slightly [[JustifiedTrope justified]], since the specific model of the FAL seen in the game was part of a shipment of about 500 of these firearms, all delivered to the Cuban police. But other parts of the game return to playing this trope straight, since while the Cuban soldiers only appear in the first level of the game it's never explained why ''every other'' Soviet-aligned military present in the game uses the FAL as well (or why half of the Viet Cong soldiers armed with them also have American M203 grenade launchers attached to them); technically, the FAL was also in service as the semi-auto [=L1A1=] Self Loading Rifle with Australian soldiers stationed in Vietnam, so the argument ''could'' be made the ones encountered in Vietcong hands are simply captured rifles. It's somewhat harder to justify the highly anachronistic French FAMAS FELIN Russians occasionally use, except the FAMAS was a Russian staple weapon in ''Modern Warfare 2'' first, so it could again just be a matter of following the leader. Also, both the Soviet special forces seen in the 1968 Kowloon mission and the Vietcong in Huế City use the SPAS-12 shotgun a firearm model from ''Italy'' which was introduced in ''[[AnachronismStew 1982]]''. The turret in the beginning of Vorkuta prison has a mounted American M249 SAW, which was made in 1984, and the player also acquires a hand-held version of the M134 Minigun, which didn't enter service until 1963 (and is also not man-portable, but [[RuleOfCool we can forgive that part]]). Several campaign levels also feature the KS-23 shotgun, a 23mm riot gun that while at least actually being a Russian model (despite it like the FAL appearing primarily in Cuban and Vietcong hands - even Mason starts with it in a mission or two set in Vietnam) was not designed until 1971 and on top of that wasn't meant for actual combat use. The closest any of these get to an actual justification is the last part of "Crash Site", where the presence of an American China Lake grenade launcher (next to a crate of Soviet [=SVDs=]) in a downed Soviet cargo plane is briefly and weakly {{handwave}}d as "some kind of setup". Somewhere, a firearms enthusiast is drinking themselves to death.

to:

* Taken UpToEleven in ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps'' which features several anachronistic faults in regards to firearms shown in the game. The FN FAL in particular - commonly known as the "Right Arm of the Free World" for its use by many Western-aligned nations, including every NATO member state except the US and West Germany - is only used, of all people, by ''Vietcong'' and ''Cuban'' soldiers in single player. To the developers' credit, the second example is slightly [[JustifiedTrope justified]], since the specific model of the FAL seen in the game was part of a shipment of about 500 of these firearms, all delivered to the Cuban police. But other parts of the game return to playing this trope straight, since while the Cuban soldiers only appear in the first level of the game it's never explained why ''every other'' Soviet-aligned military present in the game uses the FAL as well (or why half of the Viet Cong soldiers armed with them also have American M203 grenade launchers attached to them); technically, the FAL was also in service as the semi-auto [=L1A1=] Self Loading Rifle with Australian soldiers stationed in Vietnam, so the argument ''could'' be made the ones encountered in Vietcong hands are simply captured rifles. It's somewhat harder to justify the highly anachronistic French FAMAS FELIN Russians occasionally use, except the FAMAS was a Russian staple weapon in ''Modern Warfare 2'' first, so it could again just be a matter of following the leader. Also, both the Soviet special forces seen in the 1968 Kowloon mission and the Vietcong in Huế City use the SPAS-12 shotgun a firearm model from ''Italy'' which was introduced in ''[[AnachronismStew 1982]]''. The turret in the beginning of Vorkuta prison has a mounted American M249 SAW, which was made in 1984, and the player also acquires a hand-held version of the M134 Minigun, which didn't enter service until 1963 (and is also not man-portable, but [[RuleOfCool we can forgive that part]]). Several campaign levels also feature the KS-23 shotgun, a 23mm riot gun that while at least actually being a Russian model (despite it like the FAL appearing primarily in Cuban and Vietcong hands - even Mason starts with it in a mission or two set in Vietnam) was not designed until 1971 and on top of that wasn't meant for actual combat use. The closest any of these get to an actual justification is the last part of "Crash Site", where the presence of an a single American China Lake grenade launcher (next to a crate full of Soviet [=SVDs=]) in a downed Soviet cargo plane is briefly and weakly {{handwave}}d as "some kind of setup". Somewhere, a firearms enthusiast is drinking themselves to death.



** ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOpsII'' doesn't have nearly as many examples, partly since there are only four missions set during the Cold War like in the previous game, but it's still around mostly by way of reusing weapons from the first game for its flashback arsenal, most of which were outdated and replaced by the mid- to late-80s setting. So, for instance, Woods uses an original-model M16 (misidentified as the improved A1) for Operation Just Cause, at a point in time where the military had switched to the [=M16A2=]. A particular screamer, however, is from the second flashback level, set during the UsefulNotes/SovietInvasionOfAfghanistan. It would have actually made sense for the game to give some of those mid-80's Soviet troops the RPK-74 used in the first game - instead, they're given the old belt-fed RPD machine guns the RPK-74 replaced in the real world. Worse, that RPD model [[PropRecycling is lifted directly from]] ''Modern Warfare 2'', complete with a Picatinny rail over the feed tray that shouldn't exist for another nine years at that point (and which Russian military guns in general didn't start using until another decade or so later). The player also has the option of invoking this with the singleplayer version of Create-a-Class; nothing is preventing them from [[BreakOutTheMuseumPiece taking an '80s gun they like into]] the [[TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture 2025 levels]], for instance using that old M16 when the standard JSOC rifles seem to be the [=HK416=] and a slightly dressed-up [=XM8=]... or, after completing the game, [[AnachronismStew doing the opposite]] and, say, fighting a battle in the Angolan Civil War with the KRISS KARD pistol (still not in production even years after the game came out) and a completely fictional weapon like the [[ArmorPiercingAttack cover-penetrating]], [[XRayVision x-ray-scoped]] "Storm PSR".
** ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOpsIII'' deliberately invokes this in the "Demon Within" level, most of which takes place in a [[DyingDream weird sort-of flashback]] to the Battle of the Bulge from World War II - period-accurate soldiers, wearing period-accurate uniforms, getting support from period-accurate armor, but other than the rare appearance of a mounted [=MG42=], all using the same array of fictional futuristic weapons the player gets, all of which are from at least a hundred and twenty years in the future from when the actual battle took place.
* ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyWWII'': German soldiers in Normandy using Soviet-made [=PPSh=]-41s and SVT-40s. Actually not that ridiculous an example, as [[https://ww2militaria.files.wordpress.com/2011/12/ppsh_germanforces.jpg the Germans in the real life war]] were rather fond of these Soviet weapons and often kept them as war trophies, even having [=PPShs=] rechambered to fire the German 9mm round and designated MP-41(r), while the SVT-40s saw widespread use as the Germans lacked a worthwhile self-loading rifle until Walther used the captured weapon as inspiration for the G43. Still, Germans using Russian weapons ''outside'' of Russia stretches belief.

to:

** ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOpsII'' doesn't have nearly as many examples, partly since there are only four missions set during the Cold War like in the previous game, but it's still around mostly by way of reusing weapons from the first game for its flashback arsenal, most of which were outdated and replaced by the mid- to late-80s setting. So, for instance, Woods uses an original-model M16 (misidentified as the improved A1) for Operation Just Cause, at a point in time where the military had switched to the [=M16A2=].[=M16A2=] and a combat scenario where the "Commando" would have made more sense. A particular screamer, however, is from the second flashback level, set during the UsefulNotes/SovietInvasionOfAfghanistan. It would have actually made sense for the game to give some of those mid-80's Soviet troops the RPK-74 used in the first game - instead, they're given the old belt-fed RPD machine guns the RPK-74 replaced in the real world. Worse, that RPD model [[PropRecycling is lifted directly from]] ''Modern Warfare 2'', complete with a Picatinny rail over the feed tray that shouldn't exist for another nine years at that point (and which Russian military guns in general didn't start using until another decade or so later). The player also has the option of invoking this with the singleplayer version of Create-a-Class; nothing is preventing them from [[BreakOutTheMuseumPiece taking an '80s gun they like into]] the [[TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture 2025 levels]], for instance using that old M16 when the standard JSOC rifles seem to be the [=HK416=] and a slightly dressed-up [=XM8=]... or, after completing the game, [[AnachronismStew doing the opposite]] and, say, fighting a battle in the Angolan Civil War with the KRISS KARD pistol (still not in production even years after the game came out) and a completely fictional weapon like the [[ArmorPiercingAttack cover-penetrating]], [[XRayVision x-ray-scoped]] "Storm PSR".
** ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOpsIII'' deliberately invokes this in the "Demon Within" level, most of which takes place in a [[DyingDream weird sort-of flashback]] to the Battle of the Bulge from World War II - period-accurate soldiers, wearing period-accurate uniforms, getting support from period-accurate armor, but other than the rare appearance of a mounted [=MG42=], all using the same array of fictional futuristic weapons the player gets, all of which are from at least a hundred and twenty years in the future from when the actual battle took place.
* ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyWWII'': German soldiers in Normandy using Soviet-made [=PPSh=]-41s and SVT-40s. Actually not that ridiculous an example, as [[https://ww2militaria.files.wordpress.com/2011/12/ppsh_germanforces.jpg the Germans in the real life war]] were rather fond of these Soviet weapons and often kept them as war trophies, even having [=PPShs=] rechambered to fire the German 9mm round and designated MP-41(r), while the SVT-40s saw widespread use as the Germans lacked a worthwhile self-loading rifle until Walther used the captured weapon as inspiration for the G43. Still, Germans using captured Russian weapons in such numbers ''outside'' of Russia stretches belief.



*** The Assault classes in general all use machine guns that were not issued nearly as extensively as they appear in the game - nor were they [[ArbitraryGunPower as weak as in the game]]. The actual bolt-action and semi-auto rifles that were standard issue are the ones used by the aforementioned Sniper and Engineer classes.
** The Russian medic uses an MP-18, as opposed to the ridiculously common PPSH-41. This might be for balance reasons, as the PPSH's [[MoreDakka 71-round drum]] would give Russian medics a noticeable advantage in multiplayer [[note]]Although, the PPSH could also use 35-round box mags[[/note]].

to:

*** The Assault classes in general general, save for the Germans and their [=StG 44=], all use machine guns that were which are treated as generic assault rifles - not only usable but even viable for operation by a single person, issued nearly as far more extensively as they appear than in the game - nor were they reality, and [[ArbitraryGunPower as weak as in the game]]. pathetically weak]] compared to much smaller and logically weaker weapons. The actual bolt-action and semi-auto rifles that were standard issue actual standard-issue are the ones only used by the aforementioned Sniper and Engineer classes.
** The Russian medic Medic uses an MP-18, as opposed to the ridiculously common PPSH-41. This might be for balance reasons, as the PPSH's [[MoreDakka 71-round drum]] would give Russian medics a noticeable advantage in multiplayer [[note]]Although, (and the PPSH devs presumably overlooked that it could also use 35-round box mags[[/note]].mags).


** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E11Utopia Utopia]]" then takes it to a completely ridiculous extent. Guards are shown using Dragunov sniper rifles (a gun designed in the late '50s) in the year ''100 trillion''. For reference, the universe right now (in the real world) is allegedly 13.7 billion years old. This episode takes place over seven thousand times the ''age of the universe'' into the future (95.9 trillion), and they're still using a gun that is almost obsolete ''now''. On the other hand, "Utopia" does have a JustBeforeTheEnd setting where it's implied that there's no longer the resources or population to keep high technology working.

to:

** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E11Utopia Utopia]]" then takes it to a completely ridiculous extent. Guards are shown using Dragunov sniper rifles (a gun designed in the late '50s) in the year ''100 trillion''. For reference, the universe right now (in the real world) is allegedly around 13.7 8 billion years old. This episode takes place over seven thousand times the ''age of the universe'' into the future (95.9 trillion), and they're still using a gun that is almost obsolete ''now''. On the other hand, "Utopia" does have a JustBeforeTheEnd setting where it's implied that there's no longer the resources or population to keep high technology working.


* There are so many M3 Grease Guns and Stens captured by the People's Liberation Army in the Chinese civil war and the UsefulNotes/KoreanWar, it's hard to not film a war show in China without them. Cue dozens of anachronistic shows with M3s appearing before WWII. For really low-budget shows, it is possible for a Type 56 AK to appear in Imperial Japan hands. It's also common for the Type 54 (a copy of the Tokarev TT-33) or Type 64 (Walther PPK) to stand in for other pistols.



[[folder:Film]]

to:

[[folder:Film]][[folder:Film Live-Action]]



* The ''Series/DoctorWho'' story "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E8TheImpossiblePlanet The Impossible Planet]]" features the people on the base wielding P90s, a gun which would be several thousand years old at that point.[[note]]All in all, P90s shows up in all sorts of strange places in ''Doctor Who''. The BBC must have ordered a surplus.[[/note]]
** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E11Utopia Utopia]]" then takes it to a completely ridiculous extent. Guards are shown using Dragunov sniper rifles (a gun designed in the late '50s) in the year ''100 trillion''. For reference, the universe right now (in the real world) is allegedly 13.7 billion years old. This episode takes place over seven thousand times the ''age of the universe'' into the future (95.9 trillion), and they're still using a gun that is almost obsolete ''now''. On the other hand, "Utopia" does have a JustBeforeTheEnd setting where it's implied that there's no longer the resources or population to keep high technology working.
** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E6TheDoctorsDaughter The Doctor's Daughter]]" features a Webley revolver in a futuristic clone-war. Yes, the favoured weapon of the original [[TheBrigadier Brigadier]]. It also featured P90 gas-jet mock-ups, oddly enough. Couldn't they have just reused the G36s they had on hand?

to:

* The ''Series/DoctorWho'' story "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E8TheImpossiblePlanet The Impossible Planet]]" features the people on the base wielding P90s, a gun which would be several thousand years old at that point.[[note]]All in all, P90s shows up in all sorts of strange places in ''Doctor Who''. The BBC must have ordered a surplus.[[/note]]
** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E11Utopia Utopia]]" then takes it to a completely ridiculous extent. Guards are shown using Dragunov sniper rifles (a gun designed in the late '50s) in the year ''100 trillion''. For reference, the universe right now (in the real world) is allegedly 13.7 billion years old. This episode takes place over seven thousand times the ''age of the universe'' into the future (95.9 trillion), and they're still using a gun that is almost obsolete ''now''. On the other hand, "Utopia" does have a JustBeforeTheEnd setting where it's implied that there's no longer the resources or population to keep high technology working.
** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E6TheDoctorsDaughter The Doctor's Daughter]]" features a Webley revolver in a futuristic clone-war. Yes, the favoured weapon of the original [[TheBrigadier Brigadier]]. It also featured P90 gas-jet mock-ups, oddly enough. Couldn't they have just reused the G36s they had on hand?
''Series/DoctorWho'':



** The soldiers in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E4TheTimeOfAngels The Time of Angels]]"/"[[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E5FleshAndStone Flesh and Stone]]" also use P90s, although these have phony suppressors dummied on to increase their length. Interestingly, the suppressors resemble Dalek extermination beam projectors.
** A well-known old school example is the prominent use of MAC-10s by future (or alien, it isn't clear) PrivateMilitaryContractors in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS21E6TheCavesOfAndrozani The Caves of Androzani]]", as well as the people on the Beacon in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS12E5RevengeOfTheCybermen Revenge of the Cybermen]]".
** The episode "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS33E8ColdWar Cold War]]" has a 1980s Soviet submarine's crew using Browning Hi-Power pistols, which are most definitely not Russian and look nothing like the actual Soviet service pistol of the time, the Makarov PM.

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** A well-known old school example is the prominent use of MAC-10s by future (or alien, it isn't clear) PrivateMilitaryContractors in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS21E6TheCavesOfAndrozani "The Caves of Androzani"]], as well as the people on the Beacon in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS12E5RevengeOfTheCybermen "Revenge of the Cybermen"]].
** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E8TheImpossiblePlanet The Impossible Planet]]" features the people on the base wielding [=P90s=], a gun which would be several thousand years old at that point.[[note]]All in all, [=P90s=] shows up in all sorts of strange places in ''Doctor Who''. The BBC must have ordered a surplus.[[/note]]
** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E11Utopia Utopia]]" then takes it to a completely ridiculous extent. Guards are shown using Dragunov sniper rifles (a gun designed in the late '50s) in the year ''100 trillion''. For reference, the universe right now (in the real world) is allegedly 13.7 billion years old. This episode takes place over seven thousand times the ''age of the universe'' into the future (95.9 trillion), and they're still using a gun that is almost obsolete ''now''. On the other hand, "Utopia" does have a JustBeforeTheEnd setting where it's implied that there's no longer the resources or population to keep high technology working.
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E3PlanetofTheOod "Planet of the Ood"]] has guards with [=M4s=] and a guy with a PPK in the 42[-[[superscript:nd]]-] century.
** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E6TheDoctorsDaughter The Doctor's Daughter]]" features a Webley revolver in a futuristic clone-war. Yes, the favoured weapon of the original [[TheBrigadier Brigadier]]. It also featured P90 gas-jet mock-ups, oddly enough. Couldn't they have just reused the G36s they had on hand?
** The soldiers in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E4TheTimeOfAngels The Time of Angels]]"/"[[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E5FleshAndStone Flesh and Stone]]" also use P90s, [=P90s=], although these have phony suppressors dummied on to increase their length. Interestingly, the suppressors resemble Dalek extermination beam projectors.
** A well-known old school example is the prominent use of MAC-10s by future (or alien, it isn't clear) PrivateMilitaryContractors in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS21E6TheCavesOfAndrozani The Caves of Androzani]]", as well as the people on the Beacon in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS12E5RevengeOfTheCybermen Revenge of the Cybermen]]".
** The episode
"[[Recap/DoctorWhoS33E8ColdWar Cold War]]" has a 1980s Soviet submarine's crew using Browning Hi-Power pistols, which are most definitely not Russian and look nothing like the actual Soviet service pistol of the time, the Makarov PM.



* Mal's signature pistol in ''{{Series/Firefly}}'' is based off a US Civil War-era Volcanic repeater for the Western feel. From it's on-screen performance it's much more accurate and powerful and its use is accompanied by a hissing/whirring noise showing there's evidently something more high tech in there. The prop itself is a shell built over a contemporary Taurus Model 85. Jayne's handgun is a modified replica American Civil War-era [=LeMat=], an American-designed, French-built revolver that included a shotgun barrel.
** Jane's beloved [[ICallItVera Vera]] is a similarly old weapon, a heavily modified Saiga-12 shotgun originally built for the film ''Film/{{Showtime}}''. Despite this it's ostensibly a rifle in the show, and like the ''Cowboy Bebop'' notation above it needs oxygen to fire.



* An in-universe example in an episode of ''Series/{{Jake 20}}'', where one of the clues that the guys holding him are not German Secret Service is that one of the guys has a Walther PPK. Being a HollywoodNerd, he instantly recognizes Film/JamesBond's favorite gun. He's also an experienced NSA agent, so he knows that nobody uses these anymore. The other clues are constantly-dropped movie quotes ("[[Film/RoboCop1987 Can you outsmart a bullet]]?") and a watch too expensive for a government agent. Turns out they were just hackers (''American'' hackers) playing a prank on him (or rather, on the person they think is their leader).

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* An in-universe example in an episode of ''Series/{{Jake 20}}'', ''Series/Jake20'', where one of the clues that the guys holding him are not German Secret Service is that one of the guys has a Walther PPK. Being a HollywoodNerd, he instantly recognizes Film/JamesBond's favorite gun. He's also an experienced NSA agent, so he knows that nobody uses these anymore. The other clues are constantly-dropped movie quotes ("[[Film/RoboCop1987 Can you outsmart a bullet]]?") and a watch too expensive for a government agent. Turns out they were just hackers (''American'' hackers) playing a prank on him (or rather, on the person they think is their leader).



* The Steyr AUG seems to be the standard rifle aboard ''Series/RedDwarf''. Given that most of the ship's crew members are American and British, it is rather odd seeing them using a type of bullpup rifle which their nations had so far never adopted en masse. Presumably this is because of their futuristic look and because they'd be unfamiliar to British and American audiences.



* The Steyr AUG seems to be the standard rifle aboard ''Series/RedDwarf''. Given that most of the ship's crew members are American and British, it is rather odd seeing them using a type of bullpup rifle which their nations had so far never adopted en masse. Presumably this is because of their futuristic look and because they'd be unfamiliar to British and American audiences.
* There are so many M3 Grease Guns and Stens captured by the People's Liberation Army in the Chinese civil war and the UsefulNotes/KoreanWar, it's hard to not film a war show in China without them. Cue dozens of anachronistic shows with M3s appearing before WWII. For really low-budget shows, it is possible for a Type 56 AK to appear in Imperial Japan hands. It's also common for the Type 54 (a copy of the Tokarev TT-33) or Type 64 (Walther PPK) to stand in for other pistols.
* Mal's signature pistol in ''{{Series/Firefly}}'' is based off a US Civil War-era Volcanic repeater for the Western feel. From it's on-screen performance it's much more accurate and powerful and its use is accompanied by a hissing/whirring noise showing there's evidently something more high tech in there. The prop itself is a shell built over a contemporary Taurus Model 85. Jayne's handgun is a modified replica American Civil War-era [=LeMat=], an American-designed, French-built revolver that included a shotgun barrel.
** Jane's beloved [[ICallItVera Vera]] is a similarly old weapon, a heavily modified Saiga-12 shotgun originally built for the film ''Film/{{Showtime}}''. Despite this it's ostensibly a rifle in the show, and like the ''Cowboy Bebop'' notation above it needs oxygen to fire.


** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout Tactics|BrotherhoodOfSteel}}'' has the Chauchat machine gun from World War 1 as a joke weapon, even though it was manufactured in France and only during the war, which by the time the game takes place was almost 300 years ago. It was also notoriously unreliable - it will not fire in the game.

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** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout Tactics|BrotherhoodOfSteel}}'' has the Chauchat machine gun from World War 1 UsefulNotes/WorldWarI as a joke weapon, even though it was manufactured in France and only during the war, which by the time the game takes place was almost 300 years ago.in the past. It was also notoriously unreliable - it will not fire in the game.



* ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid2SonsOfLiberty'' has the enemies (Russian mercenaries) carry AN-94 assault rifles as their main weapon. While chronologically correct (the game is set in 2009, the rifle came out in 1993), the AN-94 is a bad case of RareGuns due to a very high cost, low reliability and ergonomics issues; the only users of the rifle are selected counter-terrorism Russian units. Made even weirder by the fact that some enemies use the still uncommon but way easier to obtain AKS-74U, but for some reason ''they're'' the ones in more specific, smaller roles (defense of the cores of the Big Shell).

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* ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid2SonsOfLiberty'' has the enemies (Russian mercenaries) carry AN-94 assault rifles as their main weapon. While chronologically correct (the game is set in 2009, the rifle came out in 1993), the AN-94 is a bad case of RareGuns due to a very high cost, low reliability and ergonomics issues; the only users of the rifle are selected counter-terrorism Russian units. Made even weirder by the fact that some enemies use the still uncommon but way easier to obtain AKS-74U, but for some reason ''they're'' the ones in more specific, smaller roles (defense of the cores of the Big Shell). Less impossible but no less strange, if you alert the guards and then hide, the clearing teams they send to find you are armed with the SPAS-12, a weapon of which only 37,000 were made.


** ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOpsII'' doesn't have nearly as many examples, partly since there are only four missions set during the Cold War like in the previous game, but it's still around if you look hard enough. A particular screamer comes in the second flashback level, set during the UsefulNotes/SovietInvasionOfAfghanistan. It would have made all the sense in the world for the game to give some of those mid-80's Soviet troops the RPK-74 used in the first game, given that 90% of the flashback arsenal is lifted directly from it - instead, they're given the old belt-fed RPD machine guns the RPK-74 replaced in the real world. Worse, that RPD model [[PropRecycling is lifted directly from]] ''Modern Warfare 2'', complete with a Picatinny rail over the feed tray that shouldn't exist for another nine years at that point (and which Russian military guns in general didn't start using until another decade or so later). The fact that the arsenal is otherwise directly copied from weapons in the first game also means that several of them are inappropriate because they would be outdated by the mid- to late-80s, such as the final flashback mission, set during Operation Just Cause, suggesting the original-model M16 (misidentified as the [=M16A1=]) - at a period in time when the US military had switched over to the [=M16A2=]. The player also has the option of invoking this with the singleplayer version of Create-a-Class; nothing is preventing them from [[BreakOutTheMuseumPiece taking an '80s gun they like into]] the [[TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture 2025 levels]], for instance using that old M16 when the standard JSOC rifles seem to be the [=HK416=] and a slightly dressed-up [=XM8=]... or, after completing the game, [[AnachronismStew doing the opposite]] and, say, fighting a battle in the Angolan Civil War with the KRISS KARD pistol (still not in production even years after the game came out) and a completely fictional weapon like the [[ArmorPiercingAttack cover-penetrating]], [[XRayVision x-ray-scoped]] "Storm PSR".

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** ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOpsII'' doesn't have nearly as many examples, partly since there are only four missions set during the Cold War like in the previous game, but it's still around if you look hard enough. mostly by way of reusing weapons from the first game for its flashback arsenal, most of which were outdated and replaced by the mid- to late-80s setting. So, for instance, Woods uses an original-model M16 (misidentified as the improved A1) for Operation Just Cause, at a point in time where the military had switched to the [=M16A2=]. A particular screamer comes in screamer, however, is from the second flashback level, set during the UsefulNotes/SovietInvasionOfAfghanistan. It would have actually made all the sense in the world for the game to give some of those mid-80's Soviet troops the RPK-74 used in the first game, given that 90% of the flashback arsenal is lifted directly from it game - instead, they're given the old belt-fed RPD machine guns the RPK-74 replaced in the real world. Worse, that RPD model [[PropRecycling is lifted directly from]] ''Modern Warfare 2'', complete with a Picatinny rail over the feed tray that shouldn't exist for another nine years at that point (and which Russian military guns in general didn't start using until another decade or so later). The fact that the arsenal is otherwise directly copied from weapons in the first game also means that several of them are inappropriate because they would be outdated by the mid- to late-80s, such as the final flashback mission, set during Operation Just Cause, suggesting the original-model M16 (misidentified as the [=M16A1=]) - at a period in time when the US military had switched over to the [=M16A2=]. The player also has the option of invoking this with the singleplayer version of Create-a-Class; nothing is preventing them from [[BreakOutTheMuseumPiece taking an '80s gun they like into]] the [[TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture 2025 levels]], for instance using that old M16 when the standard JSOC rifles seem to be the [=HK416=] and a slightly dressed-up [=XM8=]... or, after completing the game, [[AnachronismStew doing the opposite]] and, say, fighting a battle in the Angolan Civil War with the KRISS KARD pistol (still not in production even years after the game came out) and a completely fictional weapon like the [[ArmorPiercingAttack cover-penetrating]], [[XRayVision x-ray-scoped]] "Storm PSR".



*** ''Battlefield 1'' also has plenty of weapons in the game that were either exceedingly rare but did see limited frontline service (such as the [=M1918=] Browning Automatic Rifle and Selbstlader 1916), mass produced but never saw combat (such as the Huot Automatic Rifle) and weapons that never got past the prototype stage and never saw mass production (such as the Selbstlader 1906, Hellrigel Sub Machine Gun and Mars Automatic).

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*** ''Battlefield 1'' also has plenty of weapons in the game that were either exceedingly rare but did see limited frontline service (such as the [=M1918=] Browning Automatic Rifle and Selbstlader 1916), mass produced but never saw combat (such as the Huot Automatic Rifle) and weapons that never got past the prototype stage and never saw mass production (such as the Selbstlader 1906, Hellrigel Sub Machine Gun Hellriegel 1915 and Mars Automatic).Automatic Pistol).



** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout Tactics|BrotherhoodOfSteel}}'' has the Chauchat machine gun from World War 1 as a joke weapon, even though it was manufactured in France and only during the war. It was also notoriously unreliable - it will not fire in the game.

to:

** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout Tactics|BrotherhoodOfSteel}}'' has the Chauchat machine gun from World War 1 as a joke weapon, even though it was manufactured in France and only during the war.war, which by the time the game takes place was almost 300 years ago. It was also notoriously unreliable - it will not fire in the game.



* ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid2SonsOfLiberty'' has the enemies (Russian mercenaries) carry AN-94 assault rifles as their main weapon. While chronologically correct (the game is set in 2009, the rifle came out in 1993), the AN-94 is a bad case of RareGuns due to a very high cost, low reliability and ergonomics issues; the only users of the rifle are selected counter-terrorism Russian units. Made even weirder by the fact that some enemies use the still uncommon but way easier to obtain AKS-74U.

to:

* ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid2SonsOfLiberty'' has the enemies (Russian mercenaries) carry AN-94 assault rifles as their main weapon. While chronologically correct (the game is set in 2009, the rifle came out in 1993), the AN-94 is a bad case of RareGuns due to a very high cost, low reliability and ergonomics issues; the only users of the rifle are selected counter-terrorism Russian units. Made even weirder by the fact that some enemies use the still uncommon but way easier to obtain AKS-74U.AKS-74U, but for some reason ''they're'' the ones in more specific, smaller roles (defense of the cores of the Big Shell).



* Creator/SethMacFarlane shows technically fall into this with pistols: All are drawn as the exact same model, but are identified as what the character in question would logically be using. For example, in ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'', all pistols appear as M1911s, but in one episode, Stewie identifies one held by an Army recruiter as an M9.
** Subverted in the episode ''"Family Guy" Through the Years'' during the portion set in TheSeventies. While trying to force Chris to enlist for UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar, Peter mentions having stormed the beaches of Normandy. {{Cut|awayGag}} to Peter doing just that, holding what appears to be an era-inappropriate M14, [[BaitAndSwitch only for]] the beach in question to be filled with tourists and lifeguards, as Peter's narration reveals he "stormed the beach" in 1958.[[note]]Although that would still be a year too early for the M14, which entered production in 1959, but can be excused through RuleOfFunny.[[/note]]

to:

* Creator/SethMacFarlane shows technically fall into this with pistols: All all are drawn as the exact same model, but are identified as what the character in question would logically be using. For example, in ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'', all pistols appear as M1911s, but in one episode, Stewie identifies one held by an Army recruiter as an M9.
** Subverted in the episode ''"Family Guy" Through the Years'' during the portion set in TheSeventies. While trying to force Chris to enlist for UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar, Peter mentions having that he "knows war" since he stormed the beaches of Normandy. {{Cut|awayGag}} to Peter doing just that, holding what appears to be an era-inappropriate M14, [[BaitAndSwitch only for]] the beach in question to be filled with tourists and lifeguards, as Peter's narration reveals he "stormed the beach" in 1958.[[note]]Although that would still be a year too early for the M14, which entered full production in 1959, but can be excused through RuleOfFunny.[[/note]]



** During WWII the Russians trained dogs to run under tanks, the plan being to strap them with bombs and unleash them on the advancing Germans. They lacked actual German tanks to train with, however. When released in the field, the dogs performed [[GoneHorriblyRight exactly as trained]] and went under their own tanks. The main problem was that Soviet tanks had diesel engines, whereas their German counterparts ran on gasoline; the differences in scent had confused the dogs, and they sought out the more-familiar smelling tanks.

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** During WWII the Russians trained dogs to run under tanks, the plan being to strap them with bombs and unleash them on the advancing Germans. They lacked actual German tanks to train with, however. When released in the field, Many stories exist as to how badly this plan failed, though one involves the dogs performed performing [[GoneHorriblyRight exactly as trained]] and went going under their own tanks. The main problem was that Soviet tanks had diesel engines, whereas their German counterparts ran on gasoline; the differences in scent had confused the dogs, and they sought out the more-familiar smelling tanks.

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