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* JarPotty: In ''The Life And Times Of The Thunderbolt Kid'', Bill recounts how his mother had him use the "toity jar" whenever he needed to pee as the family were preparing to leave the house. This was all very well until he realised that [[IAteWhat she was washing out former toity jars to use as food containers]], at which point his father put a very firm stop to it.


** He visits many parts of the industrial north in ''Notes From a Small Island'' and provides a poignant reflection on the proud heritage and natural beauty of the landscape contrasted with the industrial decline and high unemployment. At one moment he looks out at a valley of former mill towns and wonders what jobs the residents are actually ''doing'' now.

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** He visits many parts of the industrial north in ''Notes From a Small Island'' and provides a poignant reflection on the proud heritage and natural beauty of the landscape contrasted with the industrial decline and high unemployment. At one moment he looks out at a valley of former mill towns and wonders what jobs the residents are actually ''doing'' now.now... and equally if not more importantly, what would their children do?


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** Bryson himself experiences at least one when coming back to his hotel after overdoing the beer a bit.


* PerspectiveFlip: [[https://www.usatoday.com/story/life/movies/2015/09/01/bill-brysons-stephen-katz/71494350/ In an interview for USA Today]], Stephen Katz (Real name:[[spoiler: Matt Angerer]]) gave his side of several experiences Bryson wrote about, including the trip to Europe in the 70s and the events of ''A Walk in the Woods''. Apparently [[spoiler: Angerer]] ''just'' got used to walking the Appalachian trail when Bryson called it off, and he went home while Bryson walked on successive trails in middle Appalachia, only to call him to come walking on the final stretch together again; he also was not as womanising as the book claimed he was. They went to Cuba together after the book sold well.

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* PerspectiveFlip: [[https://www.usatoday.com/story/life/movies/2015/09/01/bill-brysons-stephen-katz/71494350/ In an interview for USA Today]], Stephen Katz (Real name:[[spoiler: Matt Angerer]]) gave his side of several experiences Bryson wrote about, including the trip to Europe in the 70s and the events of ''A Walk in the Woods''. Apparently [[spoiler: Angerer]] Apparently [[spoiler:Angerer]] ''just'' got used to walking the Appalachian trail Trail when Bryson called it off, and he went home while Bryson walked on successive trails in middle Appalachia, only to call him to come walking on the final stretch together again; he also was not as womanising as the book claimed he was. They went to Cuba together after the book sold well.


* PerspectiveFlip: [[https://www.usatoday.com/story/life/movies/2015/09/01/bill-brysons-stephen-katz/71494350/ In an interview for USA Today]], Stephen Katz (Real name:[[spoiler: Matt Angerer]]) gave his side of several experiences Bryson wrote about, including the trip to Europe in the 70s and the events of ''A Walk in the Woods''. Apparently [[spoler: Angerer]] ''just'' got used to walking the Appalachian trail when Bryson called it off, and he went home while Bryson walked on successive trails in middle Appalachia, only to call him to come walking on the final stretch together again; he also was not as womanising as the book claimed he was. They went to Cuba together after the book sold well.

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* PerspectiveFlip: [[https://www.usatoday.com/story/life/movies/2015/09/01/bill-brysons-stephen-katz/71494350/ In an interview for USA Today]], Stephen Katz (Real name:[[spoiler: Matt Angerer]]) gave his side of several experiences Bryson wrote about, including the trip to Europe in the 70s and the events of ''A Walk in the Woods''. Apparently [[spoler: [[spoiler: Angerer]] ''just'' got used to walking the Appalachian trail when Bryson called it off, and he went home while Bryson walked on successive trails in middle Appalachia, only to call him to come walking on the final stretch together again; he also was not as womanising as the book claimed he was. They went to Cuba together after the book sold well.


* PerspectiveFlip: [[https://www.usatoday.com/story/life/movies/2015/09/01/bill-brysons-stephen-katz/71494350/ In an interview for USA Today]], Stephen Katz (Real name:[[spoiler: Matt Angerer)]]]] gave his side of several experiences Bryson wrote about, including the trip to Europe in the 70s and the events of ''A Walk in the Woods''.

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* PerspectiveFlip: [[https://www.usatoday.com/story/life/movies/2015/09/01/bill-brysons-stephen-katz/71494350/ In an interview for USA Today]], Stephen Katz (Real name:[[spoiler: Matt Angerer)]]]] Angerer]]) gave his side of several experiences Bryson wrote about, including the trip to Europe in the 70s and the events of ''A Walk in the Woods''.Woods''. Apparently [[spoler: Angerer]] ''just'' got used to walking the Appalachian trail when Bryson called it off, and he went home while Bryson walked on successive trails in middle Appalachia, only to call him to come walking on the final stretch together again; he also was not as womanising as the book claimed he was. They went to Cuba together after the book sold well.

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* PerspectiveFlip: [[https://www.usatoday.com/story/life/movies/2015/09/01/bill-brysons-stephen-katz/71494350/ In an interview for USA Today]], Stephen Katz (Real name:[[spoiler: Matt Angerer)]]]] gave his side of several experiences Bryson wrote about, including the trip to Europe in the 70s and the events of ''A Walk in the Woods''.

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* ImColdSoCold: He discusses the dangers of hypothermia to Appalachian Trail hikers in ''A Walk In The Woods'', and the 'Paradoxical Undressing' phenomena, wherein they remove all their clothes. He also recounts a day when he went off hiking and forget to pack his waterproofs. He gets soaked by the incessant drizzle and starts to lose track of time... [[spoiler:it turns out that his watch had stopped.]]


* AgeLift: In the book ''A Walk In The Woods'', Bryson and Katz are 44 years old, but the film makes them a generation older (played by Robert Redford and Nick Nolte), to allow for the fact that forty-something actors wouldn't look like people too old and fat to have much chance of hiking the Appalachian Trail.



* EverythingSoundsSexierInFrench

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* EverythingSoundsSexierInFrenchEverythingSoundsSexierInFrench: In ''Neither Here Nor There'', sex toys in Italian sound delicious, like something you'd order off a menu, while the same toys in German sound like orders barked out by a concentration camp guard. On the other hand, listening to almost any foreign television in a language you don't understand means Bryson can invent a smutty soundtrack for it, if he's feeling bored.


* BerserkButton: Ugly architecture generally and the removal of the UK's red phone boxes particularly.
** Don't forget small movie theaters.

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* BerserkButton: BerserkButton:
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Ugly architecture generally and the removal of the UK's red phone boxes particularly.
** Don't forget small Small movie theaters.



* CharacterizationMarchesOn: It is possible to track a distinct evolution in Bryson's attitudes and prejudices reading his books chronologically. He seems to become mellower and less judgmental in later books, perhaps as he becomes increasingly learned. In earlier books his treatment of women verges on outright misogyny, but in his most recent books he seems to have come over to the side of feminism (he uses 'she' as a default pronoun and is very active in documenting the achievements of women is his books about history and science, and is keen to denounce their often unacknowledged importance to their fields).The writer of books like 'A Short History Of Nearly Everything' and 'At Home' feels like a much more informed and open-minded man that the writer of 'The Lost Continent'.
** WordOfGod in [[http://augustjordandavis.blogspot.co.uk/2009/01/mark-lawson-talks-to-bill-bryson.html a BBC interview]] addresses this with Bryson admitting that much of his more [[DeadpanSnarker snarky]] crude humour in early books came from general inexperience at having to write full length books and maintain the reader's attention.

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* CharacterizationMarchesOn: It is possible to track a distinct evolution in Bryson's attitudes and prejudices reading his books chronologically. He seems to become mellower and less judgmental in later books, perhaps as he becomes increasingly learned. In earlier books his treatment of women verges on outright misogyny, but in his most recent books he seems to have come over to the side of feminism (he uses 'she' as a default pronoun and is very active in documenting the achievements of women is his books about history and science, and is keen to denounce their often unacknowledged importance to their fields).The writer of books like 'A Short History Of Nearly Everything' and 'At Home' feels like a much more informed and open-minded man that the writer of 'The Lost Continent'.
**
Continent'. WordOfGod in [[http://augustjordandavis.blogspot.co.uk/2009/01/mark-lawson-talks-to-bill-bryson.html a BBC interview]] addresses this with Bryson admitting that much of his more [[DeadpanSnarker snarky]] crude humour in early books came from general inexperience at having to write full length books and maintain the reader's attention.



* UsefulNotes/CricketRules: He has mentioned at one point that, to an American, any UsefulNotes/{{cricket}} fan's description of a match or its rules might as well be completely made-up, for how ludicrous it sounds.
** Ironically, he himself understands cricket perfectly well.
** From the point of view of a non-American, the parts of ''One Summer: America 1927'' dealing with baseball read much like this. While there are a few explanatory footnotes here and there, Bryson doesn't appear to get how much about the game (i.e. pretty much everything) you'd have to explain to the average European.

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* UsefulNotes/CricketRules: He has mentioned at one point that, to an American, any UsefulNotes/{{cricket}} fan's description of a match or its rules might as well be completely made-up, for how ludicrous it sounds.
**
sounds. Ironically, he himself understands cricket perfectly well.
**
well. From the point of view of a non-American, the parts of ''One Summer: America 1927'' dealing with baseball read much like this. While there are a few explanatory footnotes here and there, Bryson doesn't appear to get how much about the game (i.e. pretty much everything) you'd have to explain to the average European.



* DisproportionateRetribution: Some of the people who were shipped off to Australia.
** Better than being hanged for ''impersonating an Egyptian.''
** [[JustifiedTrope Justified]] at the time. Before [[UsefulNotes/VictorianBritain the Victorian Era]], the likelihood of catching criminals in a big city like London was so incredibly low that the punishments for the few caught had to act as a deterrent.
** And, in another place, [[JustifiedTrope justified]] or [[SubvertedTrope subverted]]: he discusses the cliche of people being dealt serious punishment (deportation, imprisonment etc) for the theft of a handkerchief. As he points out, this is nearly always given as an example of just how disproportionate punishment could be in the 17th and 18th centuries. But in fact, as Bryson goes on, silk would have been incredibly valuable, even rich people able to afford only a small handkerchief. It would probably have been the most valuable thing some middle-class people owned outside of their house.

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* DisproportionateRetribution: DisproportionateRetribution:
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Some of the people who were shipped off to Australia.
**
Australia. Better than being hanged for ''impersonating an Egyptian.''
**
Egyptian'' sure, but still. [[JustifiedTrope Justified]] at the time. Before [[UsefulNotes/VictorianBritain the Victorian Era]], the likelihood of catching criminals in a big city like London was so incredibly low that the punishments for the few caught had to act as a deterrent.
** And, in In another place, [[JustifiedTrope justified]] or [[SubvertedTrope subverted]]: place he discusses the cliche of people being dealt serious punishment (deportation, imprisonment etc) for the theft of a handkerchief. As he points out, this is nearly always given as an example of just how disproportionate punishment could be in the 17th and 18th centuries. But in fact, as Bryson goes on, silk would have been incredibly valuable, even rich people able to afford only a small handkerchief. It would probably have been the most valuable thing some middle-class people owned outside of their house.



* EverythingTryingToKillYou: His assessment of the local wildlife Down Under. Considering Australia even has its own header in the trope entry, he's probably right.

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* EverythingTryingToKillYou: EverythingTryingToKillYou:
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His assessment of the local wildlife Down Under. Considering Australia even has its own header in the trope entry, he's probably right.



* GenerationXerox: ''I'm A Stranger Here Myself'': When his son reads ''The Lost Continent'' and is amazed at how much Bill Bryson Sr. and Jr. seem to be alike. "I have to admit it, I have become my father. I even read license plates."

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* GenerationXerox: GenerationXerox:
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''I'm A Stranger Here Myself'': When his son reads ''The Lost Continent'' and is amazed at how much Bill Bryson Sr. and Jr. seem to be alike. "I have to admit it, I have become my father. I even read license plates."



* GretzkyHasTheBall: Done with deliberate comic exaggeration when trying to describe listening to cricket on Australian radio: "Tandoori took Rogan Josh for a stiffy at Vindaloo in '61"

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* GretzkyHasTheBall: GretzkyHasTheBall:
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Done with deliberate comic exaggeration when trying to describe listening to cricket on Australian radio: "Tandoori took Rogan Josh for a stiffy at Vindaloo in '61"



* OopNorth: On first moving to the UK and marrying, he spent many years living in a remote village in Yorkshire.

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* OopNorth: OopNorth:
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On first moving to the UK and marrying, he spent many years living in a remote village in Yorkshire.



* PornStash: Discovering his father's "modest girlie stash".

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* PornStash: PornStash:
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Discovering his father's "modest girlie stash".


* AdHominem: In ''One Summer: America 1927'', Bryson slips into the "Poisoning the Well" variant during the discussion of the guilt or innocence of Sacco and Vanzetti, listing several facts about the two of them (they were card-carrying anarchists who knew other people guilty of bombings and such) that, while not casting the two in any particularly good light, also appear to have no bearing on them being guilty of the crime they were executed for. To be fair, he's obviously trying to be impartial, but it still comes across as this trope when nothing he says actually connects the two to the crime.

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* AdHominem: In ''One Summer: America 1927'', Bryson slips into the "Poisoning the Well" variant during the discussion of the guilt or innocence of Sacco and Vanzetti, listing several facts about the two of them (they were card-carrying anarchists who knew other people guilty of bombings and such) that, while not casting the two in any particularly good light, also appear to have no bearing on them being guilty of the crime they were executed for. To be fair, he's obviously trying to be impartial, but it still comes across as this trope when nothing he says actually connects the two to the crime.


** [[JustifiedTrope Justified]] at the time. Before [[VictorianBritain the Victorian Era]], the likelihood of catching criminals in a big city like London was so incredibly low that the punishments for the few caught had to act as a deterrent.

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** [[JustifiedTrope Justified]] at the time. Before [[VictorianBritain [[UsefulNotes/VictorianBritain the Victorian Era]], the likelihood of catching criminals in a big city like London was so incredibly low that the punishments for the few caught had to act as a deterrent.


** Subvertted by his father's writing quoted in ''Thunderbolt Kid''.

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** Subvertted Subverted by his father's writing quoted in ''Thunderbolt Kid''.

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* RoadsideWave: He suffers one of these while touring Britain in ''Notes From a Small Island''.

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* ThereShouldBeALaw: In ''Notes from a Big Country'', on the subject of the drug laws in the US, he recalls Newt Gingrich calling for the death penalty for drug users... and then jokingly wonders if there should be a law against being Newt Gingrich.



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* ''The Road to Little Dribbling'' (2015)

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