Trivia / All Dogs Go to Heaven

  • Actor Allusion:
    • When the heavenly whippet looks in Charlie's records, his mother and father are named "Loni" and "Burt", and look like canine versions of Loni Anderson and Burt Reynolds (who were together at the time.) Loni also appears in the film as one of Charlie's "close friends".
    • Don Bluth's birthday is also September 13, 1937. The idea that every human year is seven dog years is a myth — Charlie is about 25. Even though he seems older.
  • Celebrity Voice Actor: As well as Burt Reynolds voicing Charlie, the German dub has him voiced by the equally rascally Harald Juhnke.
  • Dueling Movies: Released on the very same day as (and promptly slaughtered by) The Little Mermaid.
  • Executive Meddling: We were originally going to get to see Charlie's body flying off the pier (a rare example of a meddling executive making a good call). Interestingly, many book adaptations of Don Bluth films include unused artwork; ergo, the tie-in book for this film showed a very clear silhouette of Charlie's body flying alongside the car...
    • Burt Reynolds is on record for saying that there was supposed to be some casual swearing in the dialogue, all of which was removed to make the film more appropriate for children. An artifact of this can be heard on the soundtrack album, when Charlie angrily mumbles to himself "Damn, that Carface, I'll kill him!" In the movie, the "damn" is awkwardly cut out.
  • Name's the Same: Invoked. The title came from a book Don Bluth's teacher had read to him when he was a child. It was an anthology of stories about a noir-style dog detective. Bluth only remembered the title and looked it up years later when he became a filmmaker, but decided that he didn't like the story and based an entirely new one off of the title.
  • Non-Singing Voice: In the first film. While Judith Eva Barsi was only Anne-Marie's speaking voice, the film developers had adult actress, Lana Beeson, to do the singing voice for Anne-Marie in the heartwarming Tear Jerker song, "Soon You'll Come Home". Barsi did audition for the singing part but because she broke down in stress from events at home during the audition, the filmmakers decided not to push her.
    • Otherwise averted in the entire series, where many of the characters are played by professional singers.
    • Subverted, considering the fact that Burt Reynolds, Dom DeLuise, Ernest Borgnine, and Charles Nelson Reilly all get songs over the course of the series. It seems that the one thing each installment had in common was giving songs to actors who couldn't sing.
  • The Other Darrin: Save for Dom DeLuise and Charles Nelson Reily as Itchy and Killer, respectively, none of the actors from the first film are in the sequel or TV show.
  • Reality Subtext: Judith Barsi's murder during the film's production had a significant influence on it, such as changing Carface's machine gun to a completely made-up laser gun and some minor design changes to make Anne-Marie look more like her late actress. It unarguably has had an effect on audiences as well, who often find the themes of morality and scenes of a little girl in danger all the more emotional.
  • The Red Stapler: Watching this movie WILL make you want to get a German Shepard.
  • Talking To Herself: Annabelle and Belladonna are both played by Bebe Neuwirth.
  • Sleeper Hit: The first film, it did poorly in the box office but became one of the greatest-selling home video releases of all time. This is what prompted MGM to have the sequel made.
  • Trope Namer: For Big Lipped Alligator Moment, indirectly, through The Nostalgia Chick.
  • Troubled Production: The sequel, according to the directors, was originally animated in Dublin, Ireland (where Bluth's original studio, which produced the first film, used to take place before that). But then, after Screen Animation Ireland, the Dublin studio in charge of the animation, shut its doors, the animation has to be outsourced to several studios in countries like Taiwan, Korea, Canada, and Denmark in order for the film to meet up the deadline.
  • Wag the Director: Burt Reynolds and Dom DeLuise, who had developed a repertoire with one another after starring in several movies together, insisted that Don Bluth leave the room during recording sessions so that they could improvise off one another better. Despite his initial chagrin, Bluth would later admit that some of the film's best lines came from their improv.
  • What Could Have Been: The film was originally meant to be the third collaboration between Bluth and Steven Spielberg, but Spielberg quit after the two butted egos on The Land Before Time.
    • Charlie was a detective in the original draft and the film was going to be an anthology of three short stories.
    • The Hell sequence was supposed to be a lot longer than it was in the movie.
    • Burt Reynolds originally read his part with a more cartoonish "doggie" (read: Scooby-Doo) voice, which nobody liked. Reynolds persisted, saying it was cute, until Dom DeLuise pulled him aside and said "Burt, don't be an asshole," at which point he dropped it.


http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Trivia/AllDogsGoToHeaven