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Tabletop Game: Risk
"Second world war, Russian front, not a good idea... Hitler never played Risk when he was a kid... because, you know, playing Risk, you could never hold onto Asia—that Asia / Eastern European area? You could never hold it, could you? Seven extra men at the beginning of every go, but you couldn't fucking hold it. Australasia, that was the one, all the purples, get everyone on Papua New Guinea and just build up, build up, build up..."

Risk is a classic board game centred around commanding armies on a map of the world. The game starts with the random division of the world among up to eight players. Armies are gained according to how much territory each player has, whether they control entire continents, and special cards drawn from a deck. The object of the game is to control the entire world. Risk has been around for a long time and has many, many spinoffs and expansions. See Themed Stock Board Game.

One especially-interesting spinoff is Risk Legacy, which involves permanent changes to the game board during gameplay, leading to a unique experience for each session.


This game provides examples of:

  • After the End: One possibility for Risk Legacy after enough games have been played on the same board.
  • Artificial Stupidity: EA's iOS port of the game features six computer players, all using the same opening moves. This becomes especially obvious if you choose "Manual" set-up — the computer will attempt to match the "Automatic" set-up as much as possible, even when doing so is suicidally stupid.
  • Artistic License - Geography: The "Afghanistan" region doesn't even contain Afghanistan. The "Middle East" is one nation. Russia is required to hold Europe. "Northern Europe" doesn't include most of the actual Northern Europe but does include a large chunk of Central and Western Europe. Related to that: Scandinavia includes Finland (which isn't Scandinavian) but lacks Denmark (which is). Great Britain includes Ireland.note  Many areas named after countries or states don't correspond to any historical borders of that country (kind of Justified with South Africa and Central Africa, as both can be interpreted as areas rather than countries).
  • Awesome, but Impractical: Asia. If you can control it long enough to actually start getting units from it, you can steamroll the other players in numbers. Problem is that it has many territories you need to take and can be attacked from very many provinces. Lose even one lousy territory and kiss your continental bonus goodbye until you can re-take it. You can get attacked by 5 different continents, with South America being the only one that cannot. Even if you manage to get a firm hold on Asia, expect the other players to start conspiring with one other to launch multi-pronged attacks before your large numbers of reinforcements become unstoppable.
    • Newer editions of vanilla Risk have cavalry figurines to represent 5 units and cannon figurines to represent 10 (as opposed an infantryman being one unit). As awesome as it is to have cannons intimidatingly guarding your borders, get ready to waste time exchanging them for a horse and 3 men as you take losses, until you get fed up and just stick to using regular infantry for everything.
  • Bears Are Bad News: One of the Risk: Legacy factions is the Enclave of the Bear, whose soldiers, um, ride on bears.
  • Boring, but Practical: Australia. Only one way in or out (and the owner of Asia likely has bigger concerns at the start) and a total of 3 reinforcements each round (assuming that's all the player owns) means it's possible to amass an enormous army then conquer once everyone else has depleted themselves fighting each other. A good way to tell veterans from beginners is who thinks they got screwed over by getting 3 out of 4 Australia territories doled out to them and who thinks they've already won.
  • The Chessmaster: The premise of the game.
  • Chronic Backstabbing Disorder: The strategy of many players.
  • Color-Coded for Your Convenience: Every continent has its own color. Along with each Army.
  • Cool vs. Awesome: The factions in the videogame Risk: Factions are Humans, Cats, Robots, Zombies and Yetis.
  • Crapsack World: A board of Risk Legacy will most likely turn into this after enough games are played on it.
    • Vanilla Risk is basically an up-to-six-way free-for-all spread across the whole world until one guy amasses enough force to utterly crush all opposition.
  • Curb-Stomp Battle: Usually after a player has turned in their cards for a massive number of reinforcements.
  • Divine Conflict: Risk: Godstorm pits the pantheons of the Egyptians, Greeks, Norse, Babylonians, and Celtics against each other in a fight for control of the ancient world.
  • Easy Logistics; Players are allowed to "fortify" one territory per round by moving forces from one territory to another as long as there's a direct path through friendly territory. Yes, it's possible to move 10 units all the way from Alaska to the Middle East in the time it took for an enemy to move 2 units to New Guinea to Siam, details like rations and supplies be damned.
    • Even easier - the reinforcements you receive at the beginning of each turn can be placed anywhere. Even in territories you just captured last turn. Even if they are completely isolated from the rest of your territories. Hundreds of armies can appear where there was just one a moment ago with no visible source.
  • Enemy Mine: A common strategy but seeing how there's only one victor, the end result of this is easy to predict.
  • Epic Fail: Imagine invading a territory that only has one guy in it with around five guys... then losing them all to extremely bad luck with the dice.
    • Now imagine attacking Siam, holding 2 men, from Papua New Guinea with over 40 men, and losing all but 2.
  • Failed a Spot Check: Woe betide the holder of North America who doesn't notice his enemy slowly adding units to Japan and/or Kamchatka.
    • It goes both ways: woe betide the owner of Asia that fails to see the large army amassing on Alaska.
  • Forbidden Fruit: At the bottom of every box of Risk: Legacy is an envelope simply marked "DO NOT OPEN. EVER." If you choose to open it anyway, you unleash a cataclysmic event, which varies between copies, and includes awakening curses, unleashing a supervirus, or the world going out of orbit and causing major climate changes.
  • From a Single Cell / Not Quite Dead: Due to the mechanics of the reinforcements card trade in, it is possible for a player to be beaten to 1 troop in 1 territory only for him to suddenly raise an army out of nowhere. This becomes especially interesting if you're playing with the U.S. rules, in which card sets increase in value throughout the game.
    • This can become a strategy unto itself: wait until the last moment possible to turn in a set of cards, then destroy your weakest opponent and take their cards. If you still hold two cards and your enemy holds n+1, you'll very likely be forced to turn in another set, if not two, leading to a 100+ troop bonus.
  • Gaia's Lament: Risk 2210 has a war on a irradiated, polluted, Earth.
  • Hold the Line: Players on the receiving end of attacks roll their (up to) 2 dice to see how if their forces can hold. Interestingly, even though the attacker can use up to 3 dice, the advantage is theoretically always with the defense since they win if the dice tie each other (possibly to represent the "home field advantage") though the attacking player can certainly make up for this with a large enough force making repeated attacks. Truth in Television in that defending a fortified position does tend to require less manpower than conquering one.
  • Humongous Mecha: One of the units in Risk Legacy.
  • Impossible Task: Holding the continent of Asia. Good luck if you draw a mission that requires Asia.
  • Instant-Win Condition: Versions of the game with Mission cards allow someone to win if they accomplish all 4 of theirs, regardless of how much they're losing or someone else is winning at the "conquer the world" objective.
  • Ninja Pirate Zombie Robot: It's not hard to find rules for combining Risk with Monopoly. It's only slightly harder to find the rules for Risk/Monopoly/Trivial Pursuit/Clue. No, seriously.
  • One World Order: Generally, the game ends when all the space filling empires are destroyed, save one. Possibly averted in 2210 or Godstorm, which have a five-turn limit, or games where completing missions is also a victory condition, and conquering the world is something of a feat.
  • Pyrrhic Victory: Extremely common. Players that expend large numbers of troops to take territories or to finish taking control of continents often find themselves unable to actually hold it before reinforcements arrive. Every beginner has done this at least once, only to find that leaving the continent's borders lined with territories guarded by two men at most is ripe for the taking if someone else sees how weak you are.
  • Random Number God: The mechanics of the entire game are based on die rolls. Especially irritating if playing it as a video game.
  • Recycled IN SPACE!: Risk 2210 and Risk: Godstorm (a generic fantasy flavored version).
  • Red Shirt Army: It's pretty safe to assume that, after an hour or so of playing, all the pieces that were on the board to start with will be dead.
    • And of course, some of the pieces actually are red.
  • "Risk"-Style Map: Risk uses an area-based map rather than a hex-base or grid map. It is the Trope Namer.
  • Stone Wall: A common tactic is to take over Australia, hoard its bonus armies, and defend Australia's one access point with everything until you have an unstoppable army that can easily rampage through everyone else's weakened territories. On the flipside, an opponent can just as easily Stone Wall the one or two countries with access to Australia, effectively cutting that player off from the rest of the map, possibly for the entire game.

    In Risk 2210, it becomes significantly easier to Stone Wall any continent depending on the radiation tokens. South America can become just as troublesome when one of the two entry points are blocked by a nuclear wasteland. And then there is the issue when both entry points become uncrossable.
    • It's not technically Unwinnable, it just requires that the invading player a) hire a space commander, b) set up a space port, c) ship an army to the moon, c2) CONQUER THE MOON (optional), d) spend potentially copious amounts of energy cycling through the space commander deck until they come across one of the two "Invade Earth" cards, e) play said card and f) manage the lucky task of flipping over one of the two chosen countries' land cards. Otherwise, start all over from item d and hope the smug jerk holding South America doesn't decide to invade the moon in the meantime.
  • Take Over the World: It's the object of the game.
  • Unstable Equilibrium: Once a player has acquired enough territories, their per-turn troop allowances become too great for their opponents to match. Sometimes a card trade-in can turn the tables real fast.
  • Variable Player Goals: "Secret Mission" cards.
  • We Have Reserves: Your army will definitely be obliterated at some point, but all you need to do is produce the right combination of cards next turn...
    • The online Conquer Club map "Das Schloss" is notorious for this; its design can cause games to take months, and if you're using escalating cards . . . well, good luck defending against that 600 army drop.


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alternative title(s): Risk
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