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They're Called Personal Issues For A Reason
"Everyone has something at home they don't want anyone to see; that is one of the functions of a home, to provide a spot to keep such things."
Nero Wolfe, The Red Box

Keeping Secrets Sucks. We all know that. However, sometimes, the only thing that sucks more is telling those Dark Secrets. Not as common as some other Stock Aesops due to its status as a somewhat Family Unfriendly one. It serves as either a subversion or aversion of the common belief that friends don't keep secrets from friends. The idea behind this is that everybody has certain things that they'd really rather not have to say, and it isn't right to force people to say those things just to satiate one's curiosity. Say The Atoner wants to start over after his Dark and Troubled Past, for example. Or say someone doesn't want anyone to find out about a tragedy that affected them previously and offer undesired sympathy. On the other hand, this usually does come with an exemption for if there's something they're keeping secret that affects you directly.

It can also be used as a handwave in order to keep The Masquerade going. Basically, a stranger comes to town and ingratiates himself in a group. Usually, this will be a main character. In order to explain why no one in the group is curious about just why this person Walking the Earth has just wandered into town, this aesop is invoked. Sometimes, this can also be the explanation for an Unusually Uninteresting Sight.

See also There Are No Therapists. Note in Real Life, an experiment where people who didn't want to talk about their problems were randomly assigned to do so or not, the group that talked about them felt more miserable than the control, so this can certainly be Truth in Television.

Examples:

Anime and Manga
  • Kaoru says something along these lines at the beginning of Rurouni Kenshin when she invites Kenshin to live at the dojo with her, basically saying that what happened in his past is none of her business.
  • In Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex, Paz's Day in the Limelight episode revolves around his habit of sleeping around and a girl he wanted to stay with but couldn't or so he told her. He basically tells everyone it's a personal matter (when he realises what's going on) and leaves behind an address so they can clean up the aftermath;
    "It's a personal problem. I'll deal with it myself. If I become an embarrassment to Section 9 you can cut me off."
  • Cowboy Bebop. Everyone on the Bebop has issues (except Ein). Everyone knows that all the other people have issues too, but not what caused them. And none of them ever pry because Jet and Spike both believe heavily in this trope, Faye and Ed don't care, and Ein's a dog so it's not like he can just play therapist. The overall arc of the show is seeing how their old deeds come back to haunt them and how this slowly, gradually, makes them open up to each other.
  • At the end of Eden of the East, after Saki successfully finds Takizawa's mother, who abandoned him when he was five, she vanishes without a trace. Saki brushes this off with "I guess she has reasons she can't tell anyone."
  • Averted in Saiyuki, surprisingly. At first glance it seems like this would be the case, since all four main characters don't always get along and all have some extremely fucked up issues they definitely keep from everyday conversation. A couple situations help subvert it though. The first is that Goku HATES people keeping secrets from him, as seen when Gojyo's backstory is revealed (though it is Hakkai that tells that particular tale, Gojyo isn't the type to mind Goku knowing). The other is that the one who's most touchy about his issues, Hakkai, and who tends to bottle things up had all the others playing active roles in his backstory. In a profile of Hakkai, Minekura did state that Hakkai desperately wishes he could employ this trope sometimes.
  • One Piece: Luffy makes it clear that he doesn't care about the past when it comes to his True Companions.
    • This tendency is so strong that on the couple of occasions when a character's backstory has to be related in order to explain the current situation, Luffy simply falls asleep, not to bother waking back up until the talking's over.
  • Umineko no Naku Koro ni uses this as one of its main morals, especially late in, with the usual metaphor of reading someone's diary. In EP 5, Erika read Natsuhi's diary in order to find a motive for her being the culprit. In EP 8, Hachijo sets the entire audience into a frenzy by saying that she will not present to them from Eva's diary, as she had announced, in order to keep Beatrice's catbox closed.

Fan Works
  • In The Teacherof All Things the events of V-Tamers have left their mark on all the previous chosen. This is most visable in Tai who is unable to trust the rest of the Digidestined at least in part because he always had to save the day on his own before.

Film
  • In The Italian Job, Left Ear refuses to deal with the guard dogs because of an unspecified bad experience.
    Charlie: What happened?
    Left Ear: I had. A bad. Experience. Damn it, I'm deaf!

Live-Action TV
  • Was sort of the aesop of a How I Met Your Mother episode where Robin didn't want the group to know why she hates malls. Her secret eventually came out anyway thanks to Barney dredging it up, but she gets over it pretty quickly. So... the episode was about this but in the end there wasn't that much a point made either way because Robin ultimately didn't seem to mind that much that everyone found out.
  • In the third season of Leverage, it turns out that Eliot used to work for the Big Bad that they've been chasing for most of the season and has not seen fit to enlighten the rest of his crew. He's not willing to elaborate on the details.
    Eliot: Don't ask me that, Parker. Because if you ask me, I'm gonna tell you. So please, don't ask me.
  • Morgan from Criminal Minds is willing to risk jail time and the destruction of his career rather than admit to his teammates that he was sexually abused by the UnSub of the week. They figure it out anyway.
    Hotch: There are larger implications. I can't have someone on this team who keeps secrets.
    Gideon: Come on, Hotch, we all have secrets. Would you want us profiling you?
  • Mad Men: Joan forbids the Sterling Cooper secretaries from crying in the break room because she believes that personal issues are meant to be left at home.

Literature
  • Callahan's has a strict "no snooping" rule about the guests' personal issues, which is enforced by the pianist's blackjack. If anyone wants to share their problems (whether it's about their messy divorce or the alien armada poised to annihilate Earth) they are welcome and even invited to do so, but get pushy and you'll end up face down on the driveway with a nasty welt on your head.
  • In Inheritance Cycle, Murtagh was fully prepared to spend his entire stay with the Varden in "some rat hole chewing on hardtack" due to his refusal to allow them to read his memories. Although he had confided in Eragon beforehand, he didn't want the knowledge to spread that he was the son of Morzan, the Rider who helped bring Big Bad Galbatorix to power.
  • In Redeeming Love—set in the Old West during the Gold Rush—once she’s reformed and in love with Michael, Angel refuses to tell anyone about her past career as a prostitute. She deliberately dances around the subject when they meet their new neighbors, or when she acquires a job as a cook. They know she’s hiding something, but are mostly kind enough not to press her too hard. it eventually turns out that almost all of the people she deliberately hid it from found out at some point along the way and never held it against her.
  • In To Kill A Mocking Bird, the sheriff makes the case for this on Boo Radley's behalf, arguing against making a heroic deed of his known to the rest of the town on the basis that he really does just want to be left alone and would not appreciate even exposure to public praise. Everyone else concedes the wisdom of this, and the exact nature of his Dark and Troubled Past is never made clear, which suggests this is the author's opinion as well.
  • During Dr Franklins Island Semi and Miranda become very close, culminating in their first meeting in the white space. They'd had basically no secrets, but in that place everything is laid bare. Semi is angered to find Miranda is so much less confident and more desperate and pitiable than she had believed. Miranda is frightened by Semi's anger at this and at people who seem more confident than her. They reconcile, but don't like to be in the white space. Sometimes, you don't need all your secrets shared.

Manhwa
  • Anak from Tower of God keeps it a secret that her mother was a Princess of Zahard who eloped with a man and her parents were assassinated for that reason. Koon finds out and only indicates that Anak has some issues. Ship Leesoo tells her it's alright to keep those secrets with her.

Play-by-Post Games
  • Doubt Academy's Akari sincerely believes in this. This leads to her lashing out at her classmates during their first trial, as they get sidetracked by her wanting to keep some personal items to herself and out of the spotlight. This directly leads to her being falsely convicted of the crime and executed.
  • In game at Absit Omen the greatest example would be how Casey O'Doherty keeps his backstory hidden. Being born Wrong Genetic Sex and physically weak in a family of stereotypically evil Slytherins prompts an attempted super masculine outward persona in most of his interactions. This is coupled with different gendered personas as a form of mental rebellion. No matter which identity he acts under, Casey doesn't want anybody finding out who he really is.

Video Games
  • 358/2 Days uses this as a handwave in Olympus Coliseum after Phil finds out that Roxas wasn't, in fact, referred to him by Hercules.
  • Squall in Final Fantasy VIII takes this attitude for a good half of the game, believing that everyone has to deal with their own personal issues on their own and there's no point in discussing them. The rest of the cast disagrees.
  • The concept is paraphrased by Medoute at the beginning of Blaze Union's B route when she's trying to dissuade Siskier from butting into Aegina's past. (Of course, Medoute has things that happened in her past that she doesn't want to talk about, either.) Since Aegina's personal issues start causing huge problems for the party later on, though, she winds up having to discuss them and the point becomes moot. It's also suggested that if the other characters had known a little more about Garlot's personal issues, he might not have taken such an emotional beating over the course of the canon route.
  • In the sequel of Knights of the Old Republic Atton Rand really doesn't want the PC to find out about his Dark and Troubled Past. If you ask him to tell you about his past, he will say that he does not ask questions about the PC's past, so he should be left alone too. He is so unwilling to share that when Kreia digs up the truth via Mind Rape, he agrees to be her pawn so that she doesn't tell the Exile. He will get over it if your influence is high enough, though.
  • Tragically used in BlazBlue. Litchi Faye-Ling presents herself as a kind hearted and all-compassionate doctor, but she has a personal issue of contracting the corruption of the Boundary in her personal quest to save a friend, Arakune, to absolve her guilt and grief of losing him and is in danger of becoming a blob like him. She absolutely refuses to tell this personal issue to anyone else to not let them throw themselves in danger to help her, to the point that in mostly everyone's eyes that actually knows what's going on (Kokonoe, Rachel, and even a portion of fandom), she comes off as an obsessed, egotistical, selfish woman who is too blinded by love to the point of stupidity, and the enemy team exploited that to get her to join them as much as she didn't want to.

Visual Novels
  • In Higurashi no Naku Koro ni there are two important examples.
    • First, nobody tells Keiichi about the town's rather dark past because it's frankly embarrassing, but the mystery surrounding it sets off Keiichi's Hinamizawa Syndrome in Onikakushi-hen and serves as an introduction to the story.
    • In Tsumihoroboshi-hen, Rena is distrustful of Keiichi because she learns that before he moved here he started firing at little kids with an airsoft gun. He hadn't brought it up before because he was really guilty about it, but after this he goes and tells everyone else. None of them wanted to know since it frankly has nothing o do with them, rejecting Keiichi's assumption that friends should tell each other everything. Mion flat-out states that if having friends means confessing every single wrong you've ever done (particularly ones that don't matter anymore), then she doesn't want any friends.

Web Comics

Western Animation
  • In the Avatar: The Last Airbender episode "Zuko Alone", the farmer who takes in Zuko says that his past is his own business. True enough, the revelation to the whole village that Zuko is the Fire Nation prince makes them all turn against him.

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