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Siamese Twin Songs
Siamese Twin Songs (or if you prefer Conjoined Twin Songs but it doesn't have the same ring) are those which are separate, consecutive tracks on an album where the first one leads into the second as if they were one song. If the first is played without the second, it sounds as if it has been cut off in the middle. If played on the radio they are almost always played together. Many times the first track is an Epic Instrumental Opener.

If downloaded they generally come as separate files, and if ripped from a CD they always do. Fortunately, there is software to combine them into one file, at least if they are in either MP3 or open source formats, thus eliminating the annoyance of hearing what sounds like a song ending in the middle when playing songs in random order (shuffle mode).

A very distant cousin to the Cliff Hanger. Also compare Fading into the Next Song.

Not to be confused with "Siamese Twins Song" from Big Fish or any other songs with the words "Siamese" or "twins" in the title.

Examples:

  • When The Megas came out with History Repeating: Blue, the titular song was split into two parts. The first part being an introduction and the second being a remix of Mega Man 3's ever-famous Title Theme.
  • Katzenjammer's "A Kiss Before You Go" and "I Will Dance (When I Walk Away)".
  • Led Zeppelin's "Heartbreaker" and "Living Loving Maid (She's Just a Woman)."
    • Also "Friends" and "Celebration Day"
    • "The Song Remains the Same" and "Rain Song." Unlike the above two examples this pairing carried over into their concerts for a few tours, with Jimmy using his doubleneck to play the 12-string and alternatively-tuned six string songs back-to-back.
  • Pink Floyd's The Wall does this with "Outside the Wall" and "In The Flesh?". While it's usual for this to happen on a Rock Opera Concept Album, this example sees the end of the album segue into the beginning.
    "Isn't this where... we came in?"
    • This also occurs with "The Happiest Days of Our Lives" and "Another Brick in the Wall Part 2".
    • "Brain Damage" and "Eclipse" off The Dark Side of the Moon are so inseparable they're often collectively mistaken for the title track of the album.
    • "Young Lust" is only rarely played on radio without its slow paced lead-in, "Empty Spaces", and "Empty Spaces" is never played on its own.
  • "It's Showtime!" and "Down at McDonnellzzz" by Electric Six. They made a video for "McDonellzzz" but they otherwise don't play one without the other.
  • From the South Park Christmas Album "O Tannenbaum" (sung by Hitler) and "Christmastime in Hell" (with vocals led by Satan). (Though since "O Tannenbaum" and its English translation "O Christmas Tree" have been around much longer than South Park it was not "born" a Siamese Twin and this example might be better described as a Frankenstein's Monster or Human Centipede song).
  • Stevie Wright's "Evie", parts I, II and III - would be examples of Siamese Triplet Songs.
  • Arguably ACDC's "Big Balls" and "Rocker", though they may have been separated some time after birth.
  • The Beatles' 'Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band has both "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band" and its reprise with "With a Little Help From My Friends" and "A Day In The Life", respectively.
    • Also, the Abbey Road medley, with "You Never Give Me Your Money," "Sun King," "Mean Mr. Mustard," "Polythene Pam," "She Came in Through the Bathroom Window," "Golden Slumbers," "Carry That Weight," and "The End" being a Siamese octet.
  • Camper Van Beethoven's "Opi Rides Again" and "Club Med Sucks", sort of: On the original version of Telephone Free Landslide Victory they were listed as one song called "Opi Rides Again / Club Med Sucks", but the most recent reissue of the album converted them to separate tracks. They're always played together live, too.
  • Queen's "We Will Rock You" and "We Are The Champions", although they were separate songs on the single, opposite the album order on News Of The World. Though both are definitely complete songs on their own, radio DJs (and listeners) nonetheless got accustomed to playing them together.
    • A straighter example would be the Siamese Triplet Songs "Tenement Funster", "Flick of the Wrist", and "Lily of the Valley".
    • "Death On Two Legs" -> "Lazing On A Sunday Afternoon" -> "I'm In Love With My Car" from A Night at the Opera as well.
  • IQ's "Leap of Faith" and "Came Down", such that it seems surreal to listen to one without the other.
  • The White Stripes' "Pricky Thorn, But Sweetly Worn" and "St. Andrew (This Battle Is In the Air)".
  • Judas Priest's "The Hellion" and "Electric Eye" on the Screaming for Vengeance album.
  • Green Day's "Brain Stew" and "Jaded". They were even released as a single together as "Brain Stew/Jaded", shared a music video, and showed up in that sequence on International Superhits.
    • On Dookie, the ending breakdown of "Chump" goes straight into the intro to "Longview" with a fading guitar chord and a gradually shifting drumbeat.
      • "Jinx" and "Haushinka" from Nimrod connect in the same way.
    • "Last of the American Girls" and "Murder City" from 21st Century Breakdown sound incomplete when separated if you've previously heard them together, but they can work on their own if you like songs that end/start with a random burst of Morse Code.
    • "Holiday" and "Boulevard of Broken Dreams" from American Idiot are also conjoined if you're looking for it but otherwise capable of standing alone.
      • It's more obvious if you're watching the music videos.
  • Weezer's "Pink Triangle" continues directly into "Falling for You" via a guitar melody and Studio Chatter noise.
  • System of a Down's "Thetawaves" and "Roulette" is an odd one. The former is a hard rock song and the latter is an acoustic ballad. Somehow they managed to blend them together to seem like one song.
    • This actually applies to all the songs on Steal This Album, as the band had the CD deliberately pressed so there would be no track breaks (so it would seem like a home made CD-R). A particularly good example is "Pictures" into "Highway Song". "Pictures" ends abruptly, and immediately goes into the opening drum beats of "Highway Song", so well that you won't notice unless you know the album well. "Highway Song"'s verse begins at 18 seconds in and is more subdued than its intro.
    • Same goes for much of the songs at the beginning of the Toxicity album. Also, Mesmerize album opener "Soldier Side" is treated as an intro to "B.Y.O.B" when played live.
    • Also, from "Vicinity Of Obscenity" to "She's Like Heroin", combined by a loud beeping sound. It Makes Sense in Context.
    • Also, Serj Tankian (The lead singer of SOAD) has an example too, from his third solo-album Harakiri, where "Deafening Silence" goes into "Forget Me Knot" (Even to the level that the first song's final note is played in the first split second of the other song).
  • Type O Negative's "Summer Breeze" into "Set Me On Fire", on Bloody Kisses. It was originally one song called "Summer Girl", which was based on "Summer Breeze" but had new lyrics written by the band. Summer Breeze's authors Seals And Crofts got an advance copy, and would only allow the band to release the song if they used the original lyrics. The band duly rerecorded the lyrics as requested, though as the second half of the track was entirely original, they just left it as it originally was and indexed it as a separate track called "Set Me On Fire". The original uninterrupted song can be heard on a promo CD.
  • Cyndi Lauper's "He's So Unusual" and "Yeah Yeah."
  • Seussical features the songs "Alone in the Universe (Reprise)" and "Solla Sollew." The first is only a minute long and acts as a prelude for the second. Furthermore, the track break is put in the middle of a rising transition note. Five seconds later would've made the jump much less jarring.
  • Coldplay used this trope twice on Viva la Vida or Death and All His Friends. First was between "Life in Technicolor" and "Cemeteries of London," but it happens again when "The Escapist" ends the album and flows right back into "Life in Technicolor."
  • ZZ Top's "Waitin' for the Bus" and "Jesus Just Left Chicago".
  • Pendulum's "The Island" Part 1 (Dawn) and Part 2 (Dusk).
    • Also "Prelude" and "Slam".
  • Van Halen's "Eruption" and their version of "You Really Got Me." It's a bit jarring when The Best of Both Worlds separates the two songs.
  • Gorillaz's "Fire Coming Out of a Monkey's Head" is paired with "Don't Get Lost in Heaven," and "Don't Get Lost in Heaven" is paired with "Demon Days." The three flow into each other quite well, forming the climax of the album.
    • The Tea Party did the same thing on Interzone Mantras. First up is "Cathartik" which plays into "Dust to Gold" which plays into "Requiem."
  • Silversun Pickups have "There's No Secrets This Year" and "The Royal We."
  • Rishloo's "Turning Sheep Into Goats" and "Systematomatic".
  • Madonna's "Dear Jessie" and "Oh Father" from Like A Prayer. Interestingly, both were released as singles, but in the opposite at which they play.
  • Creedence Clearwater Revival's "Poorboy Shuffle" and "Feelin' Blue."
  • Frank Zappa's album "Apostrophe (')" has four linked songs: "Don't Eat The Yellow Snow" leads into "Nanook Rubs It", which leads into "St. Alphonzo's Pancake Breakfast", which finally leads into "Father O'Blivion".
  • Dream Theater's "The Mirror" and "Lie."
    • Also "Overture 1928" and "Strange Deja Vu" are frequently played together, like most songs from Metropolis, Pt. 2.
      • Often subverted by "The Dance of Eternity" and "One Last Time". The first note of "One Last Time" resolves "The Dance of Eternity", but "Dance of Eternity" is often played alone, leaving the end hanging.
    • While "Six Degrees of Inner Turbulence" is a single suite, "War Inside My Head" and "The Test That Stumped Them All" are usually played together.
    • While also an example of Book Ends, if you have Octivarium on disc-repeat, the end of the last song on the disc plays into the first song on the disc. The song even mentions "the story ends where it begins."
  • The Strawbs' "The River" and "Down by the Sea". While easily separable, they are presented this way on the albumnote , and usually performed this way live.
  • The Alan Parsons Project's "Sirius" and "Eye in the Sky".
  • Almost all of Blue Oyster Cult's Secret Treaties album does this, with "Career of Evil" leading into "Subhuman" leading into "Dominance and Submission" leading into "ME 262." Then after the side break, "Cagey Cretins" stands on its own, but "Harvester of Eyes" leads into "Flaming Telepaths," which has No Ending, leading into "Astronomy" which starts without any gap after Telepaths' sudden stop.
  • Childish Gambino's "All the Shine" and "Letter Home" follow each other on the album, and feature the same riff. "Letter Home" is short enough that it probably qualifies more as a coda to "All the Shine" than as an actual song.
  • The Kings' "This Beat Goes On" and "Switchin' To Glide".
  • Journey's "Feeling That Way" into "Anytime".
  • They Might Be Giants has "Au Contraire" and "Damn Good Times" off The Spine.
  • Sometimes averted on the radio, but Santana's "Black Magic Woman/Gypsy Queen" and "Oye Como Va" have faithfully retained their Siamese Twin status in concert and on compilations (sometimes reversed in the case of the latter).
  • The Moody Blues: The Afternoon: Tuesday Afternoon (Forever?), Sunset: The Sunset, and Evening: Time To Get Away and Twilight Time These sets of two songs couldn't live without their counterparts, often get live radio play together, and might even argue as one, four long track as a whole. You could also count Twilight Time leading into The Night: Nights In White Satin, if the last weren't so famous already.
    • Again, the same band also did this for nearly the entire Side B of To Our Children's Children's Children. Four songs, Gypsy, Eternity Road, Candle of Light, and Sun Is Still Shining all transition into one another. Though, the outtakes on the remastered show that they were originally separate. The same thing happened with A Question Of Balance's Dawning Is The Day and Minstrel's Song.
  • Superdrag's "Slot Machine" and "Phaser".
  • Bon Iver's "Creature Fear" and Team," as well as "Lisbon OH" and "Beth/Rest."
  • Ayla's "Into The Light" and "Out of the Light". Some MP3 rips combine them into one track.
  • Kraftwerk:
    • Autobahn has "Kometenmelodie 1 & 2"
    • Trans-Europe Express has "Trans Europe Express" and "Metal on Metal" on the English versionnote 
    • Computerworld has "Numbers" into "Computerworld 2"
    • Electric Cafe has "Boing Boom Tschak" into "Techno Pop"
  • Some recordings of Johann Sebastian Bach's Magnificat in D Major split up the parts "Quia respexit humilitatem" and "Omnes generationes" into two distinct tracks despite the fact that the second part is technically part of the first part because the parts are actually supposed to be distinct.
    • Recordings of religious oratorios by other composers usually have such Siamese Twin songs for the reason mentioned above.
    • Some recordings of J.S. Bach's organ toccatas and fugues or preludes and fugues cut off the last second of the toccata or prelude (which is usually just the reverb from the last notes) and stick it onto the beginning of the fugue, resulting in Siamese Twin songs. Usually this is just a result of poor editing, but with some recordings, the toccata or prelude is immediately followed by the fugue, with only a few fractions of a second of silence in between the two parts.
  • Cygnus X's "Kinderlied Part 1" and "Kinderlied Part 2" are seperate tracks on the original release of Hypermetrical, but combined into one on the remastered version.
  • Juno Reactor: "Rotorblade"->"Mars", "Nitrogen Part 1"->Nitrogen Part 2", and "Conquistador I"->"Conquistador II".
  • BT, in addition to regularly using Fading into the Next Song, has several examples of this: "Quark"->"Tripping the Light Fantastic", "Embracing the Future"->"Deeper Sunshine", "Loving You More (Garden of Ima Dub)"->"Loving You More (Final Spiritual Journey)", "Blue Skies (Radio Edit)"->"Blue Skies (Delphinium Days Mix)", "Sasha's Voyage of Ima"->"Divinity", "Solar Plexus"->"Nectar", and "Remember"->"Love, Peace, and Grease".
  • Autechre's Quaristice has a sort of Frankenstein's Monster Song (or Frankensong) over the tracks Fol3->fwzE->90101-5l-l->bnc Castl->Theswere, as well as the straight examples IO->plyPhon, Perlence->SonDEremawe, and Steels->Tankakern. Also, Eutow->C/Pach on Tri Repetae and Pro Radii->Augmatic Disport on Untilted.
  • The album version of "Since I Left You" by The Avalanches goes straight into "Stay Another Season" after the song ends, even keeping the same drumloop and bringing back the titular vocal sample of the former song. "Etoh" and "Summer Crane" also connect in similar ways.
  • Cylab's "Unparallel Universe->c21d18no3".
  • Covenant's "Slow Motion" and "Tabula Rasa".
  • Starflyer 59's "I Like Your Photographs" and "...Moves On". Although the former can work as a standalone song (abrupt ending aside), the latter can't, because it's just an extended instrumental coda.
  • Soft Cell's cover of "Tainted Love" segues into a cover of The Supremes' "Where Did Our Love Go?", although in this case the two are part of the same track.
  • D's "Hikari no niwa" is the intro to "Namonaki mori no yumegatari"—they even share the same music video. One could be forgiven for listening to the album version of the latter and thinking "wait, what happened to the acoustic intro?"
  • "Show Me Love" and "30 Minutes" by t.A.T.u. - the Mama, Papa, forgive me part at the end of "Show Me Love" is sometimes mistaken as the beginning of the song "30 Minutes".
  • Diablo Swing Orchestra's "How to Organize a Lynch Mob" and "Black Box Messiah". The former song is a brief cello solo which works better as an introduction than as a standalone song, and it gets briefly reprised at the end of the latter song.
  • Afro Celt Sound System has several. From Sound Magic, there's “Dark Moon, High Tide” and “Whirl-y-Reel 2”—the instrumental motif from the former song is repeated at the beginning of the latter. Release has "Urban Aire", which is an ambient introduction for "Big Cats". Similarly, from Seed, "Rise" is an ambient introduction for "Rise Above It".
  • Jaga Jazzist: "Day" and "Another Day" from The Styx are sonically distinct, but the last echoing note of "Day" is audible as "Another Day" begins, and "Another Day" ends by reprising the main motif from "Day".
  • Styx "Prelude 12" into "Suite Madame Blue" on Equinox.
  • Rush "Overture" and "The Temples of Syrinx" from 2112. While all 7 tracks that make up the 2112 suite are strung together (and are often recorded as a single track onto a CD rather than as separate parts) the "Overture" and "The Temples of Syrinx" are almost ALWAYS played together on the radio and in concert.
  • Savatage "Somewhere in Time / Alone You Breathe" from their "Wake of Magellan" album
  • Elton John's "Funeral for a Friend/Love Lies Bleeding" which kicks off his "Goodbye Yellow Brick Road" album. The CD version doesn't separate them and instead has it as one 11-minute-plus track.
  • The Crüxshadows' "Into the Ether" -> "Cassandra" -> "Love and Hatred" are Siamese triplet (or maybe Human Centipede) songs.
  • Psyborg Corp's "Lullaby(Blessed By Plutonium)->Technocracy'', the former of which is also the album's opener.
  • Steam Powered Giraffe's The 2¢ Show has two pairs of these: "Prelude to a Dream"/"Make Believe" and "The Ballad of Lily"/"Airheart".
  • Next To Normal does this with "You Don't Know" into "I Am The One", as well as "Why Stay/A Promise" into "I'm Alive (Reprise)" into "The Break".
  • Area 11 do this with "Vectors" and "Euphemia" in their debut album, All the Lights in the Sky.
  • Anamanaguchi "Interlude (Total Tea Time)" and "Meow" on their "Endless Fantasy" album.
  • INXS "Need You Tonight" not only segues into "Mediate" (a.k.a. "Meditate" on some pressings) on the original album, the 12" single, some greatest hits comps (though not all) and concert performances (at-least up to 1997), but they even had a joint music video.
  • On the Tears For Fears album "Songs From the Big Chair", the sixth track, "Broken", segues directly into the seventh track, "Head Over Heels", which itself segues directly into a reprise of "Broken". The band had previously released "Broken" as the B-Side to Pale Shelter, and used to play it live to beef up their short set. When they added the new song "Head Over Heels" they played it as a medley with Broken, and liked it so much they recorded this for the album.
    • The Seeds Of Love also has "Swords And Knives", "Year Of The Knife" and "Famous Last Words" fade into each other, an effect which isn't done elsewhere on the album. They are linked lyrically in places - Year Of The Knife mentions both 'knives' and 'famous final words' tying it in with the other two.
  • On the Evanescence album Fallen, the final note of "Tourniquet" fades out into a background tone in the intro of "Imaginary." This does not impede your ability to listen to the songs separately.
  • The Silent City has two examples. The first is between "It's the Start/Overture" and "Commercial (Do It Anyway)," where the first song leaves you hanging for the conclusive note until the beginning of the next. The second is between "Set a Fire" and "The Riot," where the drum beat that leads into the second song starts at the ending of the first.
  • David Bowie has, from Diamond Dogs, "Sweet Thing" lead into "Candidate", which then leads into a reprise of "Sweet Thing. On "Heroes", "Sense of Doubt", "Moss Garden" and "Neuköln" form a suite towards the end.
  • Armin van Buuren has "Prodemium"->"Precious" on 76, "Hymne"->"Sail" on 10 Years, "Desiderium 207"->"Mirage" on Mirage, and "In Ten Years from Now"->"Last Stop Before Heaven" on Intense.
  • Progressive Rock supergroup UK have, from their debut Self-Titled Album, "In The Dead Of Night"->"By The Light Of Day"->"Presto Vivace And Reprise" starting side one, and "Alaska"->"Time To Kill" starting side two.
  • Badfinger have "Money" -> "Flying" from ''Straight Up".
  • Genesis have "Unquiet Slumbers For The Sleepers..." -> "...In That Quiet Earth" -> "Afterglow" from Wind And Wuthering, and "The Cinema Show" -> "Aisle Of Plenty" on Selling England By The Pound. "Fly on a Windshield" and "Broadway Melody of 1974" from The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway also qualify, although every single CD release has mis-indexed them to make "Broadway Melody" seem like a song snippet (it's intended to start at the line "Echoes of the Broadway Everglades"). Actually, most of the first side of The Lamb and quite a few other songs on the other three sides could be considered to qualify for this trope, although just as often the band uses Fading into the Next Song.
  • Vicious Pink's "8:15 to Nowhere" and "Great Balls of Fire". The former song was also released as a separate single.
  • In the Spamalot soundtrack, "Come With Me" leads directly into the "Laker Girls Cheer".
  • Kanye West's "Lost in the World" and "Who Will Survive in America" from My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy.
  • The Cars have "Double Life"->"Shoo Be Doo"->"Candy-O" (Candy-O) and "Moving In Stereo"->"All Mixed Up" (The Cars).
  • VNV Nation's Transnational begins with the Epic Instrumental Opener "Generator", which leads into "Everything".
  • On many soundtracks for The Wizard of Oz, most of the Munchkinland sequence is present, but cut into many smaller tracks (each less than a minute long), split by main singer. The tracks on one CD are "Come out, Come out" (Glinda), "It Really Was No Miracle" (Dorothy), "We Thank You Very Sweetly" (random Munchkins and Glinda), "Ding-Dong! The Witch is Dead" (Chorus), "As Mayor of the Munchkin City" (Mayor), "As Coroner, I Must Aver" (Coroner), "Ding-Dong! The Witch is Dead (Reprise)" (Chorus), "The Lullaby League" (Girls), "The Lollipop Guild" (Boys), and "We Welcome You To Munchkinland" (Chorus). Combined togeher it's only six minutes, so maybe a split just before "Ding-Dong! The Witch is Dead" is justified as there's the closest thing to a break at that point, but that's it.
  • Hawkwind several times, notably "Automotion"/"25 Years", and "Assault and Battery"/"The Golden Void".
  • Sparks has "Propaganda"/"At Home, At Work, At Play", which were written separately but found to work perfectly together.
  • Thyx's "The Endless Journey" and "Network of Light".
  • Several songs on Ko Rn's "Life Is Peachy". They even used to play the opening tracks "Twist" and "Chi" (the former lasting less than a minute) together live (though they've started playing "Twist" on its own life in later years).
  • Interface's The Perfect World has three Siamese twin pairs: "Ignition->It Begins Today", "In Fidelity->Mirror, Mirror", and "Square One->Back To The Beginning".
  • Remember Me and I'm Back from Eminem's Marshall Mathers LP.
  • Sixx:A.M. had a few instances of this on "The Heroin Diaries Soundtrack". Most notably, the second track, "Van Nuys", just feels wrong without Nikki Sixx's monologue in "Xmas In Hell", more so since the music, quiet as it is, actually leads from "Xmas In Hell" into "Van Nuys". Likewise, "Girl With Golden Eyes", "Courtesy Call" and "Permission" just don't have the same effect when you don't hear them right after eachother in that order. They don't sound wrong or anything, they just become far less powerful. Heck, everything between "Interlude" and "Life After Death" should be heard in the correct order, because they're written specifically to be played in that order without interruptions, unlike the first half (Van Nuys, Life Is Beautiful, Pray For Me and Accidents Can Happen are less dependent on eachother).
  • Simon & Garfunkel with "Old Friends"/"Bookends". In fact, both songs were put together as one track when released as the b-side of the "Mrs. Robinson" single.
  • Nine Inch Nails has many examples of these on their albums, which often have tracks running together or one song fading in while another is ending, although most of them are separated on the radio and in concert. For instance, "Head Like a Hole" segues into "Terrible Lie" on Pretty Hate Machine, but the two are almost never played together anywhere else (in fact, most NIN shows put "Terrible Lie" near the beginning of the show and "Head Like a Hole" at the end). A straight example is "The Frail" and "The Wretched". The two play back-to-back on The Fragile and are almost always played together live. They sometimes play "The Frail" without "The Wretched" (usually as an intro to another song), but they never play "The Wretched" by itself.
  • The Guess Who have "No Sugar Tonight" and "New Mother Nature".
  • Black Sabbath's "Behind the Wall Of Sleep" and "N.I.B."
    • "Embryo" and "Orchid" are instrumentals that precede "Children of the Grave" and "Lord Of This World." On CD releases they're included as separate tracks. The band had many other examples, such as "Luke's Wall," "Jack the Stripper," "A Bit of Finger," "The Straightener" and "Death Mask." However, these were just subtitles tacked onto songs with longer instrumental sections in an attempt to invoke this trop and make it seem like the albums had more songs.
  • Sirius Satellite Radio stations such as "Classic Vinyl" would often play several album cuts that flowed into one another back-to-back, such as Pink Floyd's "Speak To Me/Breathe/On the Run", Aerosmith's "Train Kept A-Rollin'/Seasons of Wither", and The Cars's "Bye, Bye Love/Moving In Stereo".

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alternative title(s): Siamese Twin Song
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