History Main / SiameseTwinSongs

12th Sep '17 11:38:54 AM GeniusInTheLamp
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* The Iron City Houserockers' "Old Man Bar" and "Junior's Bar", which use the same melody and take place in ... well, bars (the former song is a slow tune about a young man who goes to a bar frequented entirely by old war veterans simply because the beer is cheap; the latter is more up-tempo and takes place at a more happening bar, and the song focuses on a man trying desperately to score a date).
2nd Aug '17 12:37:25 AM benda
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* Music/BoneyM's "Nightflight to Venus" and "Rasputin" are a [[DownplayedTrope downplayed example]]: the latter is most often performed on its own, but if you happen to hear the former, you can bet that "Rasputin" will follow right after.

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* Music/BoneyM's "Nightflight to Venus" and "Rasputin" are a [[DownplayedTrope downplayed example]]: the latter is most often performed on its own, but if you happen to hear the former, you can bet that "Rasputin" will follow right after.after (because of the shared drumming theme, borrowed from Music/CozyPowell's "Dance with the Devil").
2nd Aug '17 12:36:35 AM benda
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[[folder:Disco]]
* Music/BoneyM's "Nightflight to Venus" and "Rasputin" are a [[DownplayedTrope downplayed example]]: the latter is most often performed on its own, but if you happen to hear the former, you can bet that "Rasputin" will follow right after.
[[/folder]]
28th Jul '17 12:14:32 PM mlsmithca
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* Some recordings of Music/JohannSebastianBach's ''Magnificat in D Major'' split up the parts "Quia respexit humilitatem" and "Omnes generationes" into two distinct tracks despite the fact that the second part is technically part of the first part because the parts are actually supposed to be distinct.
** Recordings of religious oratorios by other composers usually have such Siamese Twin songs for the reason mentioned above.

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* Some recordings Classical music from the 1700s onwards is full of examples of multi-movement instrumental works (symphonies, concerti, sonatas, etc.) where two or more movements are intended to be played without a break (generally with the word ''attacca'' over the final measure of the earlier movement). Just to give a few examples:

*
Music/JohannSebastianBach's ''Magnificat vocal and instrumental works feature multiple examples.
** Many oratorios feature movements that are technically separate from each other but are performed as though they are two halves of a whole. In Bach's output, many recordings of the ''Magnificat''
in D Major'' major split up the parts "Quia respexit humilitatem" and "Omnes generationes" into two distinct tracks despite tracks, even though the fact that former leads directly into the second part latter.
** The Mass in B minor has even more examples. If "Gloria in excelsis Deo" and "Et in terra pax" are played separately, the former sounds cut off at the end while the latter sounds as though it starts in the middle. The duet "Domine Deus"
is technically part nominally in G major but finishes on a B minor chord to lead straight into "Qui tollis peccata mundi". The bass aria "Quoniam tu solus sanctus" accompanied by hunting horn and two bassoons (a highly unusual combination of instruments in the Baroque era) leads straight into the exuberant "Cum Sancto Spiritu" finale of the first part because "Gloria". And "Confiteor unum baptisma" leads straight into the parts are actually supposed to be distinct.
** Recordings
finale of religious oratorios by other composers usually have such Siamese Twin songs for the reason mentioned above."Credo", "Et exspecto resurrectionem mortuorum".



* Classical music from the late 1700s onwards is full of examples of multi-movement instrumental works (symphonies, concerti, sonatas, etc.) where two or more movements are intended to be played without a break (generally with the word ''attacca'' over the final measure of the earlier movement). Just to give a few examples:
** Music/LudwigVanBeethoven was very fond of this device. Although it features in both Symphony No.5 (in which the third movement leads directly into the fourth) and Symphony No.6 (in which the third, fourth, and fifth movements are played without breaks), he used it even earlier in his Piano Sonata Op.27 No.1, "Quasi una fantasia" - so named because its four movements (a slow rondo, a scherzo, a slow intermezzo, and a lively finale) are played as if the sonata was a fantasia, a single long-form work exploring many different melodic ideas and moods. Other Beethoven examples include his "Emperor" piano concerto (in which the slow movement leads straight into the finale), his violin concerto (in which the slow movement also leads straight into the finale), his String Quartet No.14 (which features seven movements played without breaks), and his Violin Sonata No.10 (in which the slow movement leads directly into the scherzo).
** One of the most striking examples in which it is not the last two movements but the first two movements which lead straight into each other is found in Music/FelixMendelssohn's Violin Concerto. The coda of the first movement builds and builds in energy until finally the full orchestra finishes on a grim E minor chord. However, the first bassoon holds its note after the rest of the orchestra falls silent, leading directly into the slow movement.
** Music/GustavMahler used this device in several of his symphonies. In No.2, the "Resurrection", the third, fourth, and fifth movements are all played without stopping; in No.4, the third movement is in the symphony's nominal home key of G major, but ends on a D major chord to lead straight into the finale (which is also in G major - at first); and in No.5, the celebrated fourth movement Adagietto for strings alone has its lingering final note echoed immediately by a single French horn note which introduces the finale.
** Music/ClaudeDebussy's "Images" for orchestra is divided into three parts: "Gigues," "Ibéria" and "Rondes de printemps," all of which have been performed separately. "Ibéria" is itself divided into three movements, but the slow middle movement, "Les parfums de la nuit," is seamlessly attached to the opening of the final movement "Le matin d'un jour de fête," providing a good reason not to perform the individual movements of "Ibéria" separately.

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* Classical music from the late 1700s onwards is full of examples of multi-movement instrumental works (symphonies, concerti, sonatas, etc.) where two or more movements are intended to be played without a break (generally with the word ''attacca'' over the final measure of the earlier movement). Just to give a few examples:
**
Music/LudwigVanBeethoven was very fond of this device. Although it features device.
** The most famous examples
in both Beethoven's work are Symphony No.5 (in 5, in which the third movement leads directly into the fourth (and returns very briefly in the middle of the fourth) and Symphony No.6 (in 6, in which the third, fourth, boisterous third movement scherzo cuts off just before the final note for the stormy fourth movement, which in turn ebbs gradually for the finale. Play any of these on their own, and fifth movements are played without breaks), he they will sound as though they either cut off or start in the middle of something.
** Beethoven had
used it even earlier the device of having the penultimate movement of a piece lead straight into the finale multiple times in his piano sonatas by the time he composed Symphonies No.5 and 6. The first was the Piano Sonata Op.27 No.1, "Quasi una fantasia" - so named because its four movements (a slow rondo, a scherzo, a slow intermezzo, and a lively finale) are played as if the sonata was a fantasia, a single long-form work exploring many different melodic ideas and moods. Other Beethoven examples include his "Emperor" piano concerto (in which While the slow movement first two movements reach final resolutions, the third ends with a short cadenza that leads straight into the finale), his violin concerto (in which the finale. The slow movement also leads movements of the ''Waldstein'', ''Appassionata'', and ''Les adieux'' sonatas likewise do not end on final resolutions, but rather lead straight into their respective finales.
** There are also multiple examples in Beethoven's works for soloist and orchestra;
the finale), his String Quartet slow movements of the triple concerto, the violin concerto, and the ''Emperor'' piano concerto all lead straight into their respective finales rather than ending on any sort of final resolution.
** Several of Beethoven's string quartets feature slow movements that lead into their finales without pause, including No.7 in F major and No.10 in E-flat major, but
No.14 (which in C-sharp minor features seven movements played which all lead straight into each other without breaks), a break; the third, fifth, and his Violin Sonata No.10 (in which sixth movements in particular do not end on final resolutions and would sound disconnected if played on their own.
** Beethoven's final violin sonata is in four movements, and in this case
the slow movement leads directly not into the scherzo).
**
finale, but into the scherzo.
*
One of the most striking examples in which it is not the last two movements but the first two movements which lead straight into each other is found in Music/FelixMendelssohn's Violin Concerto. The coda of the first movement builds and builds in energy until finally the full orchestra finishes on a grim E minor chord. However, the first bassoon holds its note after the rest of the orchestra falls silent, leading directly into the slow movement.
** * Music/GustavMahler used this device in several of his symphonies. In No.2, the "Resurrection", the third, fourth, and fifth movements are all played without stopping; in No.4, the third movement is in the symphony's nominal home key of G major, but ends on a D major chord to lead straight into the finale (which is also in G major - at first); and in No.5, the celebrated fourth movement Adagietto for strings alone has its lingering final note echoed immediately by a single French horn note which introduces the finale.
** * Music/ClaudeDebussy's "Images" for orchestra is divided into three parts: "Gigues," "Ibéria" and "Rondes de printemps," all of which have been performed separately. "Ibéria" is itself divided into three movements, but the slow middle movement, "Les parfums de la nuit," is seamlessly attached to the opening of the final movement "Le matin d'un jour de fête," providing a good reason not to perform the individual movements of "Ibéria" separately.
27th Jun '17 7:13:30 PM Cuchulainn
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* Music/FrankZappa's album ''Music/{{Apostrophe}}'' has ''four'' linked songs: "Don't Eat The Yellow Snow" leads into "Nanook Rubs It", which leads into "St. Alphonzo's Pancake Breakfast", which finally leads into "Father O'Blivion".

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* Music/FrankZappa's album ''Music/{{Apostrophe}}'' has ''four'' linked songs: "Don't Eat The Yellow Snow" leads into "Nanook Rubs It", which leads into "St. Alphonzo's Pancake Breakfast", which finally leads into "Father O'Blivion". From the same album, there's "Excentrifugal Forz," which leads into the titular instrumental.
27th Jun '17 6:35:52 PM Cuchulainn
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* "Ventilator Blues" and "I Just Want to See His Face" from Music/TheRollingStones' ''Music/ExileOnMainSt''.
13th Jun '17 1:05:41 AM TimeLordVictorious
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** "Mad World" and "Pale Shelter" from ''The Hurting''.
13th Jun '17 1:04:50 AM TimeLordVictorious
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** "Money" and "Us and Them". The two are more often than not played live together.
28th May '17 6:08:28 PM BehemothDeTerre
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* Music/{{Dark Tranquillity}}'s "Mine is the Grandeur..." and "... of Melancholy Burning" from the ''The Gallery''. Not only do they lead into one another, but the elipses make it clear they're supposed to be played together, and that the title is a single sentence.

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* Music/{{Dark Tranquillity}}'s "Mine is the Grandeur..." and "... of Melancholy Burning" from the ''The Gallery''. Not only do they lead into one another, but the elipses make it clear they're supposed to be played together, and that the title is a single sentence.
28th May '17 6:07:54 PM BehemothDeTerre
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* Music/{{Dark Tranquillity}} "Mine is the Grandeur... / ... of Melancholy Burning" from their ''The Gallery''. Not only do they lead into one another, but the elipses make it clear they're supposed to be played together.

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* Music/{{Dark Tranquillity}} Tranquillity}}'s "Mine is the Grandeur... / ... Grandeur..." and "... of Melancholy Burning" from their the ''The Gallery''. Not only do they lead into one another, but the elipses make it clear they're supposed to be played together.together, and that the title is a single sentence.
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