troperville

tools

toys

Wiki Headlines
It's time for the second TV Tropes Halloween Avatar Contest, theme: cute monsters! Details and voting here.

main index

Narrative

Genre

Media

Topical Tropes

Other Categories

TV Tropes Org
random
Plain Jane
"I sometimes wished to have rosy cheeks, a straight nose, and small cherry mouth; I desired to be tall, stately and finely developed in figure; I felt it a misfortune that I was so little, so pale, and had features so irregular and so marked."

A character, usually female, who describes herself as homely, ugly or unattractive, or is described as such by another character or the author. These types of characters tend to go one of three ways;
  1. The character really isn't plain at all and comes to this realization herself or it is pointed out by another character. This type of Plain Jane could have been beautiful all along or grown up nicely as the story progressed.
  2. The girl in question really is homely, but compensates for her looks with her skill, smarts or heart. This type seems to acknowledge her unattractiveness, but does nothing to better her appearance and couldn't care less. This type of Jane is usually a tomboy or a working girl. Usually ends with a "Don't judge a book by its cover" aesop, but not always.
  3. The Jane is very aware of her "ugliness" and uses it as a reason to wangst and get attention from others. This more often then not can result in "I just want to be beautiful".

The Jane can also be the butt monkey of the story because of her looks and used for comedy. If the Jane is only considered ugly in canon, then she may suffer from a case of Hollywood Homely.

Compare Blessed with Suck, when Jane's plainness acts as an asset, and Ugly Cute. Contrast The Beautiful Elite and So Beautiful, It's a Curse.
Examples:

Anime and Manga

Film

Fanfiction

Literature
  • Jane Eyre:
    • Most likely the trope namer. Jane not only tells herself she's unattractive, but most of the other characters do as well. However, later in the story it's hinted she may be too harsh or herself.
    • Mr. Rochester also qualifies as a rare male example. His looks are frequently described as plain, if not downright ugly. But he has a captivating personality and is Tall, Dark and Snarky, so women still find him appealing.
  • Mary from The Secret Garden. She is described as an ugly and stern child, but becomes somewhat prettier as the novel progresses and she becomes happier.
  • Harry Potter's friend Hermione Granger is first described as frizzy-haired, buck-toothed and shrill, but she eventually outgrows it.
  • Biddy from Great Expectations.
  • Catherine Sloper in Washington Square is always described as plain. The narrator and other characters describe her as having the kind of looks that would be better suited to an older woman than a 20 year old, making her perhaps a delayed version of She's All Grown Up.
  • Sonea from The Black Magician Trilogy describes herself as being average looking, but she doesn't lack for male attention, and is regarded as attractive by those same males.
  • Opal Cowan from the Storm books sees herself as plain, especially compared to previous protagonist Yelena, but she proves just as appealing to men, if not more so. The book cover also shows her as being very attractive.
  • Another literal example with Jane Rizzoli from Tess Gerritsen's "Rizzoli" series. She's a very good example of Type 2, as it's mentioned in the first book that she went into police work because she knew it was a career where she would be respected for her mind, not her looks. Yet it's also mentioned that she isn't necessarily bad-looking, but seems reluctant to play up whatever attractiveness she might have—wearing unflattering suits, no makeup. And she's clearly NOT okay with not being beautiful, as she often complains about it and resents women who are.
  • Pride and Prejudice:
    • Mary Bennet, a poor little girl, is the only one plain among her very attractive sisters who are all reputed beauties. She strives to gain as many accomplishments as possible and reads a plays the piano all the time. However, it's also implied she's not that smart either. By the end of the book, she's relieved a bit when her sisters are married off and she's no longer troubled by the comparison. Word of God has it that she married a man from Meryton and was considered a star.
    • Charlotte Lucas is Elizabeth Bennet's particular friend. She's described as plain-looking by various characters, herself and the narrator. She's very sensible, reasonable and definitely not a romantic. She considered herself a bit of a Christmas Cake, and gladly married a stupid and obnoxious guy. She was certain she could not do better. To her credit, she arranged her surely difficult life with him quite comfortably.
  • Adela Quested in A Passage to India. She knows she's not attractive and several characters acknowledge it as well. She's on her way to marry a guy who is also not good-looking.

Theatre
  • In some versions of Bare: A Pop Opera, Nadia describes herself this way in a song called "Plain Jane Fat Ass."

Western Animation
The Pirates Who Don't Do AnythingCharacterization TropesPlaying a Tree
Phone-Trace RaceSublime RhymePretty Fly for a White Guy

random
TV Tropes by TV Tropes Foundation, LLC is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available from thestaff@tvtropes.org.
Privacy Policy
14710
24