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Frequently-Broken Unbreakable Vow
A character who makes The Promise, must follow the Prime Directive, or is otherwise The Fettered will be forced to break it... repeatedly. Usually they'll face a veritable parade of situations that force them to choose whether To Be Lawful or Good, Godzilla Thresholds that require heartless necessity, and otherwise constantly force them to compromise their word and/or morals to win, do what's right, survive and/or protect loved ones.

This may take a variety of forms, for example the Actual Pacifist will be turned into a Reluctant Warrior who has to kill to protect the innocent. The Captain will have the completion of their orders and the lives of Innocent Bystanders as mutually exclusive. The Watcher will be compelled off his True Neutral vague fence sitting into taking a side. On a smaller scale, any parent or lover promising to "spend time" with a loved one will be called away to duty... not that the loved one ever understands or puts up with for long.

Expect The Fettered and The Cape with a Heroic Vow to be especially prone to suffer this, though the Noble Demon may be an infrequent target. See also Oddly Common Rarity. If the story has Magically Binding Contracts involved, they'll be as binding as warm swiss cheese. Unless it isn't. If the vow is only broken once or twice, then it's Batman Grabs a Gun.


Examples:

Anime and Manga
  • Roger Smith of The Big O often says that violence is a last resort in his negotiations... but then, we would never get to his Humongous Mecha if negotiations didn't break down on a regular basis, now would we?
  • In Bakuman。, Mashiro and Azuki promise to never see each other until their dreams come true, but this is broken on a few occasions, such as when Mashiro is hospitalized or when Azuki receives an offer to be the female lead in Natural+, resulting in Mashiro having to come to see her, inspiring her to act on her desire to turn it down. They lampshade how often they've seen each other in spite of their promise, but note that the cases have been emergencies. Azuki decides that they will kiss the next time they see each other so that they will commit to their promise. The next time they meet is after Azuki becomes the female lead for Mashiro and Takagi's anime.
  • This is the reason Byakuya has become a Knight Templar by the start of Bleach. As a noble, he is expected to embody the rules and traditions of Soul Society, but he broke these rules twice; once to marry a commoner he'd fallen in love with and, when she died, he swore on her deathbed he'd find, adopt, and protect her little sister (Rukia), breaking the law a second time. He swore that this would be the absolute last time, and that he'd obey the laws no matter what from here on. So, later when Rukia was branded a criminal to be executed for her crimes, he obeyed the law, captured her, and prevented her friends from rescuing her. After being defeated by Ichigo, however, Ichigo convinces him that there's nothing wrong with breaking an unjust law, as shown in the page quote of To Be Lawful or Good. Byakuya has also since learned to abuse loopholes when subverting orders that he personally disapproves of but which aren't actually unjust; sometimes it's possible to not personally break any rules but at the same time facilitate someone else breaking them. Especially when his superiors didn't think to specifically forbid him from doing this.

Comic Books
  • In the Marvel Universe the Watcher repeatedly violated his oath of non-intervention. Sometimes he does so outright (as in his very first appearance), other times he finds ways to "technically" obey the oath while still somehow helping Earth's heroes. For example, he likes to make his presence known to Earth's heroes (not difficult given his immense size) whenever observing a major event, even though he can watch events just fine from light-years away. Therefore, he doesn't even have to utter a word to make it clear that something of great importance is about to happen.

Literature
  • Used frequently in A Song of Ice and Fire, even to the point of Running Gag extremes. Many major groups in the setting take vows of chastity (Maesters of the Citadel, Black Brothers of the Night's Watch, brothers of the Kingsguard, etc.) and few of them take the vow even a little bit seriously. (The Night's Watch gets by on a bit of Loophole Abuse: their vow is to "father no children," and given the ubiquity of moon tea and tansy in the setting, as long as they stick to whores who know their business, there's relatively little chance of that.)
  • In the Warrior Cats series, the Warrior Code (which forbids inter-Clan relationships, has rules about territory, lists prerequisites to achieve certain ranks, and lists other rules about what they're allowed and not allowed to do) is broken quite often.
    • Goes to the point of deconstruction with Hollyleaf, who is so obsessed with the code that she breaks down when she realizes that she's the product of a forbidden inter-Clan relationship.
  • Death of the Discworld is bound by The Duty to impartially collect souls, and has apparently done so offscreen very diligently for thousands of years, but in the books themselves he has a breakdown and runs off more than once, and also spares people's lives repeatedly because of curiosity or pity or personal relations or because Granny Weatherwax asks him to. (He also killed someone for no reason in the first book, but that was before his character was really decided.)

Live-Action TV
  • Star Trek: The Original Series. Captain Kirk's willingness to break the Prime Directive whenever he needed to save the Enterprise and/or a "stagnant" culture is well known. He was also a hypocrite on the issue, condemning Captain Tracy in "The Omega Glory" for doing something he had done before and would do again. Note that Mr. Spock was also guilty for not arresting Kirk each time he did it (as noted in "The Omega Glory", any Starfleet officer who doesn't take action is as guilty as the person committing the offense).
    • Subsequent captains weren't much better.
    • In an episode of Star Trek: Enterprise, Archer imagines that maybe some day, there'll be some kind of rule or directive to save captains from having to make such judgment calls. Of course, the judgement call in question was his decision to withhold a cure from a dying race, based on Phlox's assertion that nature "selected" them to die so another race could thrive. A Prime Directive would have at least given Archer a rule he could hide behind to justify committing genocide.
    • Oddly enough, TNG asserted that Kirk had violated the Prime Directive in circumstances TOS clearly established was not a Prime Directive violation by the interpretation held by Starfleet at the time (they would have been in TNG, but Kirk can hardly be faulted for not knowing about regulation changes decades before they happen).
    • "The Drumhead" reveals that even Picard, by far the most diplomatic Captain, nonetheless had nine separate violations on his record. This was a late season 4 episode, meaning he had dozens more episodes and four movies in which to rack up more violations.
    Admiral Satie: Would it surprise you to learn that you have violated the Prime Directive a total of nine times since you took command of the Enterprise? I must say, Captain, it surprised the hell out of me.

Visual Novel

Web Original
  • Discussed in the Writing Excuses episode on Comedy: putting a character in a situation in which violating their principles is easy and adhering to them is painful is a good and fairly easy way to create humour or drama, but you can't keep forcing them to break their principles or they stop being principles.

Real Life
  • Words like "'til death do you part" and "for as long as you both shall live" are very common in wedding vows. The divorce rate approaches or exceeds 50% in many Western countries (although it's inflated somewhat by serial divorcers). The infidelity rate is harder to measure exactly, but is also quite high. Do the math.
  • Likewise, some Catholic bishops release priests from their duties and vows of celibacy, because they've fallen in love and want to get married. It's a relatively long process because of the seriousness of the change and the awareness that often such feelings pass and fade as above, but there is a process in place.
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