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Comicbook: The Tomb of Dracula
Dracula sinks his fangs on yet another victim.

"The years have been long, and I am weary of them. I yearned for those things for which I once lived... The clouds across a glowing moon... The baying of night's children... And most of all, I yearn for that most pleasing taste... The sweet nectar of life itself!"
Dracula, the first issue

A Bronze Age horror comic book from Marvel. It follows Count Dracula's exploits throughout Europe and America as he tries out various evil schemes while fighting with vampire hunters and various monsters.

The first volume of the series ran for over seventy issues in the seventies. After its cancellation in '79, it was immediately followed by a black and white volume 2 that only had six issues.

A Spin-Off series named Dracula Lives ran alongside the main book for twelve issues (and one annual issue of reprinted stories).

There have also been two four-issue miniseries bearing the book's name afterwards; a Darker and Edgier tale titled Day of Blood! Night of Redemption! in 1991 (which resides in its own continuity) and the other one in 2004, which was mostly to show how badass Blade can be. Dracula himself is still a recurring villain in the Marvel Universe.

This series was also the basis of the anime movie Dracula: Sovereign of the Damned.

Examples within the series:

  • Attempted Rape: Dracula saves one woman from being raped, only to feed on her blood.
  • Badass Boast: When Dracula is dueling Brand for the status of Lord of Vampires, he gives this boast:
    Dracula: For 500 years I've defended what is mine against insipid upstarts as you, Brand — for 500 years I've clawed my way past the mindless minions who have ever sought to take what is mine. But never shall my lien be taken by one such as you. I am lord of evil, little man — forever and always!
  • The Beastmaster: Dracula is shown to have power upon rats and wolves.
  • Big "NO!": Cried out every now and then. First example being Clifton's reaction when he sees freshly resurrected Dracula in the first issue.
  • The Blank: The one-issue villain Faceless Fiend, who was a man who lost his features when he was dropped into nuclear waste.
  • Brainwashed and Crazy: One issue has Dracula hypnotizing bunch of children to attack the vampire hunters.
  • Breaking and Bloodsucking:
    • In Day of Blood! Night of Redemption!, Lila has locked herself in her dorm and lies in bed mourning the death of her girlfriend. Dracula slips through her door as a mist and she's terrified because she recognizes him and had seen him kill before. A moment later his shirt comes off and his raw, primal sex appeal overpowers both her fear and her protests of being lesbian. He feeds during sex dooming her to become his obsessed slave.
    • In The Savage Return of Dracula, an unconscious Jeanie is left as bait on a bed in Castle Dracula, a crucifix around her neck to protect her. Dracula returns from a hunt and finds her in one of his rooms. He attempts to attack her when Frank counterattacks, but he is overpowered and left for dead. Jeanie awakens and Dracula hypnotizes her to throw away the cross. Defenseless, Dracula drains her dry.
  • Breakout Character: Blade, who went to become one of the most recognized vampire hunters in Marvel universe, and whose feature film helped to bring superhero movies back to public consciousness.
  • Brought Down to Normal: Satan turns Dracula back to human as a punishment for bringing Janus, a creature of both Heaven and Hell, in to the world. It actually lasted a good 10 issues.
  • Canon Discontinuity: The 90s miniseries, which events are ignored by subsequent stories set in Marvel universe.
  • Compressed Adaptation: Dracula: Sovereign of the Damned tried to fit the entire 70-issue comic into an hour and a half of film.
  • Conservation of Ninjutsu: After a lengthy process of defeating Blade's Evil Knockoff and separating the two from each other, he and Hannibal King come across a dozen of them made from themselves when they go after Deacon Frost, and defeat them with ease.
  • Continuity Nod: When Dracula fights the literary version of Frankenstein's Monster, he mentions his fight against "the real one" from the pages of The Frankenstein Monster.
  • Covers Always Lie: Various covers would show Dracula in a brink of peril, only for the actual action to play out differently.
  • Dem Bones: One of the issues had Dracula fight the skeleton of a man who was moved from his grave for occult purposes and was seeking revenge.
  • Demonic Possession: Inverted with an angelic possession when Domini resurrects Janus with divine assistance.
  • The Dragon: Vampirized Brand and later Juno to Dr. Sun.
  • Duel to the Death: Dracula has to duel for the title of The Lord of Vampires with its new holder after losing it due to being turned into human.
  • Enemy Mine: Just when it seems that everything is finally over upon Dracula's death, Dr. Sun puts his plan into motion to conquer the world and the vampire hunters are forced to resurrect the Lord of Vampires to stop the doctor.
  • Even Evil Has Standards: Dracula actually does have some degree of standards. He saves a woman from a rapist, and helped a woman get revenge on her murderous husband by making her into a vampire, healing her injuries in the process. He also expressed disgust when a father killed his wife for obscenely petty reasons.
  • Everything's Deader with Zombies:
    • Frank Drake is attacked by "zuvembies" while visiting South America. Luckily, Brother Voodoo is there to help him.
    • Dracula raises one graveyardful of undead in the final book of the 90's miniseries.
  • Evil-Detecting Dog: Quincy's guard dog Saint.
  • Evil Knock Off: A vampire version of Blade is created by his nemesis Deacon Frost.
  • Flaying Alive: Dracula rips the skin off from strip club guard's head in the 1991 miniseries.
  • Fur Against Fang: Dracula's fight against Werewolf by Night.
  • God Guise: One major story arc started as a result of Count Dracula appearing before a Satanic cult preparing a sacrifice to give to their dark master. Afterwards, Dracula says that he is in fact the Devil, and that the cult should serve him.
  • Hollywood Satanism: The Scion of Satan led by Anton Lupeski is a typical human-sacrificing cult from fiction.
  • Hollywood Voodoo: One issue had a paralyzed man using this to exact revenge upon those who he felt had wronged him.
  • Hostile Weather: A storm is raging when Frank and company arrive at the Castle Dracula in the first issue.
  • I Hate You, Vampire Dad: Lilith. Unsurprisingly, when Dracula comes begging for help she not only tells Dracula to fuck off but tries to murder him as well.
  • Immortality Immorality: When there's vampires about, there's also people wanting immortality from them. First example in the series is the aging model Ilsa Strangway, who seeks to rejuvenate back to her younger appearance.
  • Impromptu Tracheotomy: Drake hits Dracula in throat with a stake in the 90's miniseries.
  • Interrupted Suicide: After the death of vampirized Jeanie, Frank attempts to kill himself by jumping off from a bridge. However, Rachel and Taj stop him.
  • It's All About Me: In one issue, Dracula reminisces about the time he spoke with a perfectly charming little girl who displayed no fear whatsoever of him. He enters her home with her permission to meet the parents of such a delightful child, and finds her parents are a pair of jerks who insult Dracula. The expected happens and Dracula tells the girl that he 'liberated' her from these oafs. The weeping child curses him and a miffed Dracula walks off, musing sourly on humanity's ingratitude and how he's had such a trying day.
  • Man on Fire: One woman is burned to death in the 90's miniseries.
  • Motive Decay: Dracula's motives range from killing the hunters chasing him to causing a full scale Vampire Apocalypse.
  • Murder by Mistake: Janus' death, as the bullet was meant for Dracula.
  • Off with His Head!: When Smirnoff confronts Dracula to turn him into a vampire in the 90's miniseries, Dracula simply rips off his head and kicks it away like a football.
  • Oh Crap: There's a collective Oh Crap moment when the combined forces of the vampire hunters and Anton Lupeski attempt to defeat Dracula, and Anton accidentally shoots Dracula's infant son Janus. Dracula is not pleased.
  • Pet the Dog: Dracula has his moments of helping and caring for others than himself.
  • Phlebotinum Overload: How Dracula is defeated in 90's miniseries.
  • Plucky Comic Relief: When the action moves to Boston, we're introduced to bumbling novelist Harold Harold and his ditzy co-worker Aurora.
  • Questioning Title: Title of the third issue; "Who Stalks the Vampire?"
  • Refugee from TV Land: In one story during Dracula's reign of Scion of Satan, he comes across a woman who can bring people from books to life. Since All Girls Want Bad Boys, she wants Dracula to be her lover and summons him. He isn't amused that he is mistaken for a fictional character, especially the one created by Bram Stoker, and starts fighting her other companions, which include Zorro, D'Artagnan and Frankenstein's Monster.
  • The Renfield: Dracula turns Frank Drake's backstabbing friend Clifton Graves into his slave for the first dozen issues. His servitude ends when he is caught in an exploding cruiser at the sea.
  • Role Called: The title was extended into The Tomb of Dracula: Lord of Vampires! halfway through during the book's run in seventies (which also throws in an Excited Show Title! for good measure).
  • Scotland Yard: Featured on some of the issues set in England.
  • Silver Bullet: One of the means to fight vampires.
  • Skunk Stripe: One-time villain Mrs. Strangway has a white stripe on her hair.
  • Smite Me, O Mighty Smiter: After his son's death, Dracula climbs up a building to scream his plea of death to heavens.
  • The Speechless: Taj, whose throat was damaged when vampires attacked him and his family in India.
  • Staking the Loved One: Quincy is forced to stake his daughter Edith after Dracula has turned her into a vampire.
    • The book uses this trope endlessly. The reader quickly realizes that any prisoner who's not one of the mains is done for.
  • Stuffed into the Fridge: Happens quickly to Frank's girlfriend Jeanie early on. Same fate later falls on Quincy's daughter Edith.
  • Summon Bigger Fish: The satanists try to summon a big monster to kill Dracula, what they get is the Silver Surfer.
  • Super Smoke: Dracula can turn into a mist. He usually does it to dodge projectiles and to escape from tricky situations.
  • Super Window Jump: Dracula has a knack for jumping in and out of windows.
  • Take Over the World: Dr. Sun's primary goal. Dracula will also adopt such plans if he learns the method to do so.
  • Talking Is a Free Action: Just because there's a fight going on, doesn't mean that Dracula can't gloat and boast at the same time.
  • Thriller on the Express: One of the issues has Dracula on-board a train, along with his chasers and (at the the moment) an unknown third party who thinks they are after them.
  • Time Travel: The black surfaced mirror that appears in the early issues has the power to send its user back in time when proper incantations are used. Dracula attempts to kill professor Van Helsing in past through it.
  • Torches and Pitchforks: Angry mob from a village near Dracula's castle burn the place down in the first issue.
  • Transformation Sequence: Dracula is shown turning into a bat every now and then.
  • Vampires Are Sex Gods: Dracula assaults attractive women in nearly every issue, and when he bites them the act is typically described in sexual terms.

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