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* {{Bowdlerise}}: The edited version is so heavily censored that it fits on a single disc.


'''''Life After Death''''' is the second album ([[ShortLivedBigImpact of two]]) by Music/TheNotoriousBIG, released March 25, 1997 - just 16 days after Biggie was murdered in Los Angeles, technically making it a posthumous album, though it was completed before he was killed.

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'''''Life ''Life After Death''''' Death'' is the second album ([[ShortLivedBigImpact of two]]) by Music/TheNotoriousBIG, released March 25, 1997 - just 16 days after Biggie was murdered in Los Angeles, technically making it a posthumous album, though it was completed before he was killed.


10. A strong word called "consignment".

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10. A strong word called "consignment"."consignment", strictly for live men, not for freshmen.


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** "Long Kiss Goodnight" is a more direct shot at 2Pac.


'''Life After Death''' is the second album ([[ShortLivedBigImpact of two]]) by Music/TheNotoriousBIG, released March 25, 1997 - just 16 days after Biggie was murdered in Los Angeles, technically making it a posthumous album, though it was completed before he was killed.

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'''Life '''''Life After Death''' Death''''' is the second album ([[ShortLivedBigImpact of two]]) by Music/TheNotoriousBIG, released March 25, 1997 - just 16 days after Biggie was murdered in Los Angeles, technically making it a posthumous album, though it was completed before he was killed.


* GettingHighOnTheirOwnSupply: Rule number four of the "Ten Crack Commandments" advises potential drug dealers not to do this, lest they face the consequences. Doubles as a nod to Film/{{Scarface1983}}'s Tony Montanna, who ''did'' get high off his own crack, only to lose everything.

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* GettingHighOnTheirOwnSupply: Rule number four of the "Ten Crack Commandments" advises potential drug dealers not to do this, lest they face the consequences. Doubles as a nod to Film/{{Scarface1983}}'s ''[[Film/{{Scarface1983}} Scarface]]'' protagonist Tony Montanna, Montana, who ''did'' get high off his own crack, only to lose everything.

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* GettingHighOnTheirOwnSupply: Rule number four of the "Ten Crack Commandments" advises potential drug dealers not to do this, lest they face the consequences. Doubles as a nod to Film/{{Scarface1983}}'s Tony Montanna, who ''did'' get high off his own crack, only to lose everything.


* ListSong: "Ten Crack Commandments". It originally included a sample of [[Music/PublicEnemy Chuck D]] counting to ten from the song "Shut 'Em Down", but Chuck, who is both StraightEdge and heavily critical of drug dealing, was so incensed at being sampled in a song about drug dealing that he sued to have it removed.

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* ListSong: "Ten Crack Commandments". It originally included a sample of [[Music/PublicEnemy Chuck D]] counting to ten from the song "Shut 'Em Down", but Chuck, who is both StraightEdge UsefulNotes/StraightEdge and heavily critical of drug dealing, was so incensed at being sampled in a song about drug dealing that he sued to have it removed.


-->-- '''"Sky's the Limit"'''

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-->-- '''"Sky's -->--'''"Sky's the Limit"'''



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-->-- '''"Sky's the Limit"'''

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* EpicRocking: The 6:08 "Notorious Thugs".


While it's not ''quite'' as universally acclaimed as ''[[FirstInstallmentWins Ready to Die]]'', ''Life After Death'' is still widely considered a classic in its own right and one of the defining albums of the late '90s. In 2003, the album placed at #483 on Magazine/RollingStone's list of [[Music/RollingStone500GreatestAlbumsOfAllTime the 500 greatest albums of all time]].

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While it's not ''quite'' [[FirstInstallmentWins as universally acclaimed as ''[[FirstInstallmentWins Ready as]] ''Ready to Die]]'', Die'', ''Life After Death'' is still widely considered a classic in its own right and one of the defining albums of the late '90s. In 2003, the album placed at #483 on Magazine/RollingStone's list of [[Music/RollingStone500GreatestAlbumsOfAllTime the 500 greatest albums of all time]].

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* SongParody: "Player Hata", a robbery-themed take on the Delfonics' "Hey Love".


The album was also released during the peak of the infamous East Coast/West Coast hip-hop feud of the '90s. It was released a while after the death of Biggie's main rival Music/TupacShakur, but retains a few sly references to the beef (such as the line "My so-called beef with You-Know-Who" on "Notorious Thugs"), as well as a few subliminal disses thrown at several other rappers Biggie was beefing with, such as Music/{{Nas}} and [[Music/WuTangClan Raekwon and Ghostface Killah]].

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The album was also released during at the peak tail-end of the infamous East Coast/West Coast hip-hop feud of the '90s. It was released a while after the death of Biggie's main rival Music/TupacShakur, but retains a few sly references to the beef (such as the line "My so-called beef with You-Know-Who" on "Notorious Thugs"), as well as a few subliminal disses thrown at several other rappers Biggie was beefing with, such as Music/{{Nas}} and [[Music/WuTangClan Raekwon and Ghostface Killah]].

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->''If the game shakes me or breaks me''\\
''I hope it makes me a better man''\\
''Take a better stand''\\
''Put money in my mom's hand''\\
''Get my daughter this college grant so she don't need no man''\\
''Stay far from timid''\\
''Only make moves when your heart's in it''\\
''And live the phrase 'sky's the limit'.''\\
''Muthafuckas. See you chumps on top.''

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* GangstaRap: A mix of Commercial, Hardcore and Mafioso.

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