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* The first two games in the ''VideoGame/MaxPayne'' by Creator/RemedyEntertainment series was noir tales in style of Creator/JohnWoo set in TheBigRottenApple and featured a lot of references to respectively Myth/NorseMythology and ''Literature/ParadiseLost'', had rather cartoonish enemies [[EnemyChatter whose chatter]] which often functioned as comic relief, used graphic novels sequences in lieu of cutscenes, and had a some story was often self-referential and even bordered on SelfParody a couple of times. Enter the third game by [[Creator/TakeTwoInteractive Rockstar Games]], which is based rather heavily on ''Film/ManOnFire'' and is set in Brazil, features enemies who deliberately are incomprehensible to anyone who doesn't understand Portuguese, and even then their dialogue is clearly not meant to be comical in any way, has normal cutscenes which are again based heavily on ''Man on Fire'''s visual style, and while the game sometimes do become self-referential these moments are fewer and further in-between and are relatively downplayed.

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* The first two games in the ''VideoGame/MaxPayne'' by Creator/RemedyEntertainment series was were noir tales in the style of Creator/JohnWoo set in TheBigRottenApple TheBigRottenApple, and featured a lot of references to respectively Myth/NorseMythology and ''Literature/ParadiseLost'', had rather cartoonish enemies [[EnemyChatter whose chatter]] which often functioned as comic relief, used graphic novels novel sequences in lieu of cutscenes, and had a some story that was often self-referential and even bordered on SelfParody a couple of times. Enter the third game by [[Creator/TakeTwoInteractive Rockstar Games]], Games,]] which is based rather heavily on ''Film/ManOnFire'' and is set in Brazil, features enemies who deliberately are incomprehensible to anyone who doesn't understand Portuguese, and even then their dialogue is clearly not meant to be comical in any way, has normal cutscenes which are again based heavily on ''Man on Fire'''s visual style, and while the game sometimes do does become self-referential self-referential, these moments are fewer and further in-between and are relatively downplayed.

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* BleachedUnderpants: A work clearly intended for adults is given an adaptation that is more kid-friendly and eschews the original's mature content.


** FriendlyFranchiseSomberSpinoff: When a normally lighthearted franchise has dark spin-offs.

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** FriendlyFranchiseSomberSpinoff: When a normally lighthearted franchise has dark spin-offs.


Changes to tone are not always permanent; in order to qualify, they must be long-lasting. A single dark episode in an otherwise light and fluffy show is '''not''' a Tone Shift.

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Changes to tone are not always permanent; permanent, but in order to qualify, they must be long-lasting. A single dark episode in an otherwise light and fluffy show is '''not''' a Tone Shift.

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* TamerAndChaster: A work started sexy but becomes tame with the time or in its adaptations.


Please only add examples that don't fit into one of the {{Sub Trope}}s.

Compare GenreShift.

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Please only add examples that don't fit into one of the {{Sub Trope}}s.

Compare GenreShift.GenreShift and MoodWhiplash.


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Please only add examples that don't fit into one of the SubTropes.

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Please only add examples that don't fit into one of the SubTropes.
{{Sub Trope}}s.


Changes to tone are not always permanent, but in order to qualify they must be long-lasting. A single dark episode in an otherwise light and fluffy show is not a '''Tone Shift'''.

to:

Changes to tone are not always permanent, but permanent; in order to qualify qualify, they must be long-lasting. A single dark episode in an otherwise light and fluffy show is not '''not''' a '''Tone Shift'''.
Tone Shift.



Please only add examples that don't fit into one of the subtropes.

to:

Please only add examples that don't fit into one of the subtropes.
SubTropes.


* The first two games in the ''VideoGame/MaxPayne'' by Creator/RemedyEntertainment series was noir tales in style of Creator/JohnWoo set in TheBigRottenApple and featured a lot of references to respectively Myth/NorseMythology and ''Literature/ParadiseLost'', had rather cartoonish enemies [[EnemyChatter who's chatter]] which often functioned as comic relief, used graphic novels sequences in lieu of cutscenes, and had a some story was often self-referential and even bordered on SelfParody a couple of times. Enter the third game by [[Creator/TakeTwoInteractive Rockstar Games]], which is based rather heavily on ''Film/ManOnFire'' and is set in Brazil, features enemies who deliberately are incomprehensible to anyone who doesn't understand Portuguese, and even then their dialogue is clearly not meant to be comical in any way, has normal cutscenes which are again based heavily on ''Man on Fire'''s visual style, and while the game sometimes do become self-referential these moments are fewer and further in-between and are relatively downplayed.

to:

* The first two games in the ''VideoGame/MaxPayne'' by Creator/RemedyEntertainment series was noir tales in style of Creator/JohnWoo set in TheBigRottenApple and featured a lot of references to respectively Myth/NorseMythology and ''Literature/ParadiseLost'', had rather cartoonish enemies [[EnemyChatter who's whose chatter]] which often functioned as comic relief, used graphic novels sequences in lieu of cutscenes, and had a some story was often self-referential and even bordered on SelfParody a couple of times. Enter the third game by [[Creator/TakeTwoInteractive Rockstar Games]], which is based rather heavily on ''Film/ManOnFire'' and is set in Brazil, features enemies who deliberately are incomprehensible to anyone who doesn't understand Portuguese, and even then their dialogue is clearly not meant to be comical in any way, has normal cutscenes which are again based heavily on ''Man on Fire'''s visual style, and while the game sometimes do become self-referential these moments are fewer and further in-between and are relatively downplayed.

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* GenreShift: A work strays far from its original concept as it progresses.

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* GoingCosmic: A work begins to incorporate more philosophical and theological themes.

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** ''Series/FullerHouse'', its SequelSeries, has more adult content and self awareness than the original, complete with the cast [[BreakingTheFourthWall glaring at the camera]] when the current status of Michelle (who has not returned to the series) is brought up.


* ''Series/FullHouse'' started with some family-friendly undertones but otherwise a run-of-the-mill sitcom. Over time, it brought the family-friendly aspect more and more to the forefront until they were dropping {{Aesop}} anvils every episode. Complete with heavy Flanderization and a continual feed of new child actors.

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* ''Series/FullHouse'' started with some family-friendly undertones but otherwise a run-of-the-mill sitcom. Over time, it brought the family-friendly aspect more and more to the forefront until they were dropping {{Aesop}} anvils every episode. Complete with heavy Flanderization {{Flanderization}} and a continual feed of new child actors.


* The first two games in the ''VideoGame/MaxPayne'' by Creator/RemedyEntertainment series was noir tales in style of Creator/JohnWoo set in TheBigRottenApple and featured a lot of references to respectively NorseMythology and ''Literature/ParadiseLost'', had rather cartoonish enemies [[EnemyChatter who's chatter]] which often functioned as comic relief, used graphic novels sequences in lieu of cutscenes, and had a some story was often self-referential and even bordered on SelfParody a couple of times. Enter the third game by [[Creator/TakeTwoInteractive Rockstar Games]], which is based rather heavily on ''Film/ManOnFire'' and is set in Brazil, features enemies who deliberately are incomprehensible to anyone who doesn't understand Portuguese, and even then their dialogue is clearly not meant to be comical in any way, has normal cutscenes which are again based heavily on ''Man on Fire'''s visual style, and while the game sometimes do become self-referential these moments are fewer and further in-between and are relatively downplayed.

to:

* The first two games in the ''VideoGame/MaxPayne'' by Creator/RemedyEntertainment series was noir tales in style of Creator/JohnWoo set in TheBigRottenApple and featured a lot of references to respectively NorseMythology Myth/NorseMythology and ''Literature/ParadiseLost'', had rather cartoonish enemies [[EnemyChatter who's chatter]] which often functioned as comic relief, used graphic novels sequences in lieu of cutscenes, and had a some story was often self-referential and even bordered on SelfParody a couple of times. Enter the third game by [[Creator/TakeTwoInteractive Rockstar Games]], which is based rather heavily on ''Film/ManOnFire'' and is set in Brazil, features enemies who deliberately are incomprehensible to anyone who doesn't understand Portuguese, and even then their dialogue is clearly not meant to be comical in any way, has normal cutscenes which are again based heavily on ''Man on Fire'''s visual style, and while the game sometimes do become self-referential these moments are fewer and further in-between and are relatively downplayed.

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