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* ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorneySpiritOfJustice'' has the character Pees'lubn Andistan'dhin, a temple monk who LooksLikeJesus, plays mellow music, and even ''sings'' his testimony in court. [[spoiler:He's also secretly a {{metalhead}}, and his voice deepens considerably when he gets serious]].



* In ''VideoGame/UrbanRivals'' this is the Roots clans hat.

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* In ''VideoGame/UrbanRivals'' this is the Roots clans clan's hat.



* There are few if any video games actually set in the hippie world or where you play a hippie yourself, although the setting would be perfect for a casual game similar to VideoGame/VirtualVillagers. There are a few dress-up games for girls that let you choose hippie-like attire.

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* There are few if any video games actually set in the hippie world or where you play a hippie yourself, although the setting would be perfect for a casual game similar to VideoGame/VirtualVillagers.''VideoGame/VirtualVillagers''. There are a few dress-up games for girls that let you choose hippie-like attire.

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* ''ComicBook/TheUltimates'': Thor starts off looking like one. He even goes on tours, focuses on environmental missions, war protests, and writes self-help books in a classic new-age hippie fashion instead.


* Perennial Wrestling/{{WCW}} jobber-to-the-stars Brad Armstrong was briefly repackaged as Buzzkill, a hippie-ized expy of his more popular brother Brian James' "Road Dogg" gimmick.

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* Perennial Wrestling/{{WCW}} jobber-to-the-stars Brad Armstrong Wrestling/BradArmstrong was briefly repackaged as Buzzkill, a hippie-ized expy of his more popular brother Brian James' "Road Dogg" "Wrestling/RoadDogg" gimmick.


Naturally, this growing mainstream attention, especially by hangers-on who came for the drugs and the sex, led to a different, more negative hippie stereotype emerging by TheSeventies, especially as incidents like the [[Film/GimmeShelter Altamont disaster]] and the [[UsefulNotes/CharlesManson Manson Family murders]] showed Americans a dark side to the hippie movement. These hippies, instead of [[FreeLoveFuture free-love idealists]] who [[HigherUnderstandingThroughDrugs expanded their minds through psychoactive drugs]], were portrayed as burnouts under the sway of drug pushers, gangsters, and {{cult}} leaders who wished to exploit them both financially and sexually. Oftentimes, they were seen as susceptible to [[DirtyCommunists extreme leftist political ideologies]] as well. While there was some TruthInTelevision to this, many "New Left" activists of that era actually shared the disdain that the "squares" held for the hippie movement, albeit for very different reasons: they saw the hippies not as dangerous radicals shredding public morals and the fabric of society, but as [[ApatheticCitizens politically and socially apathetic]] and unwilling to actually face the problems in the world as opposed to withdrawing from it into their own communes and societies. Music/GilScottHeron, in his 1970 poem [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qGaoXAwl9kw "The Revolution Will Not Be Televised"]], famously castigated the hippies as drones engaging in a hollow rebellion who would likely try to sit on the sidelines when the ''real'' revolution came, NotSoDifferent from the mainstream society they rejected, and reworked the famous slogan used to define the hippie culture into "plug in, turn on, and [[SellOut cop out]]".

to:

Naturally, this growing mainstream attention, especially by hangers-on who came for the drugs and the sex, led to a different, more negative hippie stereotype emerging by TheSeventies, especially as incidents like the [[Film/GimmeShelter Altamont disaster]] and the [[UsefulNotes/CharlesManson Manson Family murders]] showed Americans a dark side to the hippie movement. These hippies, instead of [[FreeLoveFuture free-love idealists]] who [[HigherUnderstandingThroughDrugs expanded their minds through psychoactive drugs]], were portrayed as burnouts under the sway of drug pushers, gangsters, and {{cult}} leaders who wished to exploit them both financially and sexually. Oftentimes, they were seen as susceptible to [[DirtyCommunists extreme leftist political ideologies]] as well. While there was some TruthInTelevision to this, many "New Left" activists of that era actually shared the disdain that the "squares" held for the hippie movement, albeit for very different reasons: they saw the hippies not as dangerous radicals shredding public morals and the fabric of society, but as [[ApatheticCitizens politically and socially apathetic]] and unwilling to actually face the problems in the world as opposed to withdrawing from it into their own communes and societies. Music/GilScottHeron, in his 1970 poem [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qGaoXAwl9kw "The Revolution Will Not Be Televised"]], famously castigated the hippies as [[RuleAbidingRebel drones engaging in a hollow rebellion rebellion]] who would likely try to sit on the sidelines when the ''real'' revolution came, NotSoDifferent from the mainstream society they rejected, and reworked the famous slogan used to define the hippie culture into "plug in, turn on, and [[SellOut cop out]]".


While the hippies eventually faded from mainstream attention by TheEighties, [[https://bampfa.org/program/hippie-modernism-struggle-utopia key elements of the hippie counter/subculture]] went on to become integral parts of modern society, including [[http://members.aye.net/~hippie/hippie/special_.htm what you're reading this on.]] The ideals of the Haight-Ashbury counterculture heavily impacted the technology industry that arose in nearby Stanford and Silicon Valley, and with it the related hacker and computer cultures of the late 20th century, bringing to them a broadly anti-authoritarian culture, a belief in changing the world through technology, and the ideal that InformationWantsToBeFree. Timothy Leary, the LSD guru who coined the hippie slogan "turn on, tune in, and drop out", even celebrated the personal computer as the new LSD late in his life, and came up with a new, CyberPunk variation on his old saying: "turn on, boot up, jack in". Ironically, many of the original hippies scorned computers as tools of centralized control, but the hackers saw them quite differently.

to:

While the hippies eventually faded from mainstream attention by TheEighties, [[https://bampfa.org/program/hippie-modernism-struggle-utopia key elements of the hippie counter/subculture]] went on to become integral parts of modern society, including [[http://members.aye.net/~hippie/hippie/special_.htm what you're reading this on.]] The ideals of the Haight-Ashbury counterculture heavily impacted the technology industry that arose in nearby Stanford and Silicon Valley, and with it the related hacker and computer cultures of the late 20th century, bringing to them a broadly anti-authoritarian culture, a belief in changing the world through technology, and the ideal that InformationWantsToBeFree. Timothy Leary, the LSD guru who coined the hippie slogan "turn on, tune in, and drop out", even celebrated the personal computer as the new LSD late in his life, and came up with a new, CyberPunk variation on his old saying: "turn on, boot up, jack in". Ironically, many of the original hippies scorned computers as tools of centralized control, control[[note]]the Diggers, on the other hand, saw them as a new way to create art; Creator/RichardBrautigan, who worked with the Digger-led Communication Company, wrote [[https://allpoetry.com/All-Watched-Over-By-Machines-Of-Loving-Grace one of his most beautiful poems]] about computers enabling humanity to create a new {{Arcadia}}[[/note]], but the hackers saw them quite differently.


[[http://www.dailykos.com/story/2006/08/09/234908/- This stereotype is a caricature]] of a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_hippie_movement series of art and political movements]] (plural) that started with the Beats, partly fueled and fused by LSD. Acid evangelists included Timothy Leary's [[EruditeStoner League for Spiritual Discovery]] and Ken Kesey's [[DrugsAreGood Merry]] [[EverybodyMustGetStoned Pranksters]]. There were also the [[http://diggers.org Diggers]], the Tropers/{{Anonymous}} of the 1960s, who sought a realistic path to a totally free economy[[note]]The familiar slogan "Do your own thing" originated with the Diggers: their other less-well-known slogan was "Everything is free." If you gave money to a Digger, he or she was liable to give it away or set it on fire.[[/note]], the [[http://diggers.org/alf Artists Liberation Front]], and the [[http://www.sfmt.org/index.php San Francisco Mime Troupe]] street theater. [[http://www.gutenberg-e.org/hodgdon/11_Ch_01_ed.html Much more here]] about how these groups interacted and formed a new society. Word got out, attracting youthful runaways and seekers who flocked in the thousands to San Francisco's Haight-Ashbury district and to [[http://ny.curbed.com/2014/9/4/10052426/the-strange-history-of-the-east-villages-most-famous-street New York's Lower East Side]] during the "Summer of Love". These seeking young people were the ones most people think of as "hippies" today although [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Etymology_of_hippie the term is much older than that]].

to:

[[http://www.dailykos.com/story/2006/08/09/234908/- This stereotype is a caricature]] of a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_hippie_movement series of art and political movements]] (plural) that started with the Beats, partly fueled and fused by LSD. Acid evangelists included Timothy Leary's [[EruditeStoner League for Spiritual Discovery]] and Ken Kesey's [[DrugsAreGood Merry]] [[EverybodyMustGetStoned Pranksters]]. There were also the [[http://diggers.org Diggers]], the Tropers/{{Anonymous}} of the 1960s, who sought a realistic path to a totally free economy[[note]]The familiar slogan "Do your own thing" originated with the Diggers: their other less-well-known slogan was "Everything is free." If you gave money to a Digger, he or she was liable to give it away or set it on fire.[[/note]], the [[http://diggers.org/alf Artists Liberation Front]], and the [[http://www.sfmt.org/index.php San Francisco Mime Troupe]] street theater. [[http://www.gutenberg-e.org/hodgdon/11_Ch_01_ed.html Much more here]] about how these groups interacted and formed a new society. Word got out, attracting youthful runaways and seekers who flocked in the thousands to [[http://www.documentcloud.org/documents/809208-the-hashbury-is-the-capital-of-the-hippies.html San Francisco's Haight-Ashbury district district]] and to [[http://ny.curbed.com/2014/9/4/10052426/the-strange-history-of-the-east-villages-most-famous-street New York's Lower East Side]] during the "Summer of Love". These seeking young people were the ones most people think of as "hippies" today although [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Etymology_of_hippie the term is much older than that]].

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* ''Series/YediYuz'': Oşa of "Hayatın Musikisi" is a new age caricature who wears Indian-style tunics and draws on esoteric mysticism to help "cure" his clients of their ailments.


* ''Series/{{Crashing}}'' has Lief, a loser hippy who sleeps with Pete's wife but is so friendly and upbeat that Pete can't bring himself to hate him.

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* ''Series/{{Crashing}}'' ''Series/{{Crashing|US}}'' has Lief, a loser hippy who sleeps with Pete's wife but is so friendly and upbeat that Pete can't bring himself to hate him.


* Captain Trips, the hippie superhero from the [[Literature/WildCards Wild Cards novels]].

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* Captain Trips, the hippie superhero from the [[Literature/WildCards Wild Cards novels]]. The name comes from an early nickname for [[Music/TheGratefulDead Jerry Garcia]].


* Post-Summer of Love, many hippies bought rural property, re-learning rural skills on single-family farms, collective farms or {{Commune}}s. The trope of the "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Back-to-the-land_movement back to the land]]" country hippie who "mellowed out and raised potatoes" was so influential that it gave birth in 1974 to a set of Mattel dolls called [[http://clickamericana.com/eras/1970s/sunshine-family-from-mattel-1974-1978 the Sunshine Family]] and an array of [[http://clickamericana.com/eras/1970s/sunshine-family-play-sets-1970s wholesome, back-to-nature playsets]]. ([[http://ilovethesunshinefamily.blogspot.com/ Much more here]] and [[https://translate.google.com/translate?sl=auto&tl=en&js=y&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&u=http%3A%2F%2Ffabysattic.eklablog.com%2Fthe-sunshine-family-1974-1982-generalites-c315333&edit-text=&act=url even more here]].) Steve, Stephie and baby Sweets had a four-room farmhouse, a truck, a surrey cycle and a craft business with many supplementary kits. The "idea books" taught kids how to do things like -- yep -- raise potatoes and [[ScavengedPunk make useful things out of recycled or repurposed materials]]. Later it started to look like a {{Commune}} was forming with a cat and dog, a horse, cow and chicken, grandparents, a red-haired single-mother auntie with her daughter who "came to visit forever"[[note]]given the time period, she might be presumed to have a husband or fiance who'd died or was a POW/MIA in Vietnam[[/note]] more babies, and neighbors called the Happy Family -- Hal, Hattie and baby Hon -- the first Afro-American doll friends who weren't just black versions of the main characters.

to:

* Post-Summer of Love, many hippies bought rural property, re-learning rural skills on single-family farms, collective farms or {{Commune}}s. The trope of the "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Back-to-the-land_movement back to the land]]" country hippie who "mellowed out and raised potatoes" was so influential that it gave birth in 1974 to a set of Mattel dolls called [[http://clickamericana.com/eras/1970s/sunshine-family-from-mattel-1974-1978 the Sunshine Family]] and an array of [[http://clickamericana.com/eras/1970s/sunshine-family-play-sets-1970s wholesome, back-to-nature playsets]]. ([[http://ilovethesunshinefamily.blogspot.com/ Much more here]] and [[https://translate.google.com/translate?sl=auto&tl=en&js=y&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&u=http%3A%2F%2Ffabysattic.eklablog.com%2Fthe-sunshine-family-1974-1982-generalites-c315333&edit-text=&act=url even more here]].) Steve, Stephie and baby Sweets had a four-room farmhouse, a truck, a surrey cycle and a craft business with many supplementary kits. The "idea books" taught kids how to do things like -- yep -- raise potatoes and [[ScavengedPunk make useful things out of recycled or repurposed materials]]. Later it started to look like a {{Commune}} was forming with a cat and dog, a horse, cow and chicken, a farm produce stand, grandparents, a red-haired single-mother auntie with her daughter who "came to visit forever"[[note]]given the time period, she might be presumed to have a husband or fiance who'd died or was a POW/MIA in Vietnam[[/note]] more babies, and neighbors called the Happy Family -- Hal, Hattie and baby Hon -- the first Afro-American doll friends who weren't just black versions of the main characters.


** One suspects that much of the scenery is really the result of market-savvy former hippies [[TheThemeParkVersion playing up the simplified stereotypes for all they're worth]] [[ModernMinstrelsy in order to amuse and pander to uninformed outsiders]]. The "multicolored tie-dyed clothing," for example, [[UnbuiltTrope wasn't even that ubiquitous in the '60s]]. If you look at quite a few of the pictures of "flower children" from that era, you'll notice that they're often wearing fairly drab clothing (partly, of course, a sign of their aloofness from middle-class materialism, but also simply to keep warm -- San Francisco can get plenty chilly!). Most real hippies wore ordinary jeans and sweaters for every day and saved the colorful costumes for parades, dances and other special occasions. [[http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,878729-1,00.html "Tie-dye" did not actually become stylish until 1970]] -- three years after the Summer of Love.[[note]]Digger Judy Goldhaft-Berg used to teach tie-dye at the "Trip Without A Ticket" free store in early '67, but you didn't see a lot of it around compared to, say, embroidery or appliques.[[/note]] The tie-dyed shtick is probably either {{Flanderization}} of a minor fad or marketers confusing the hippie subculture with the "glitter rock" and disco subcultures of the '70s.

to:

** One suspects that much of the scenery is really the result of market-savvy former hippies [[TheThemeParkVersion playing up the simplified stereotypes for all they're worth]] [[ModernMinstrelsy in order to amuse and pander to uninformed outsiders]]. The "multicolored tie-dyed clothing," for example, [[UnbuiltTrope wasn't even that ubiquitous in the '60s]]. If you look at quite a few of the pictures of "flower children" from that era, you'll notice that they're often wearing fairly drab clothing (partly, of course, a sign of their aloofness from middle-class materialism, but also simply to keep warm -- San Francisco can get plenty chilly!). Used/vintage clothing shops like [[https://www.thecut.com/2017/11/the-new-york-origins-of-vintage-shopping.html Limbo]] also provided part of the hippie look. Most real hippies wore ordinary jeans and sweaters for every day and saved the colorful costumes for parades, dances and other special occasions. [[http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,878729-1,00.html "Tie-dye" did not actually become stylish until 1970]] -- three years after the Summer of Love.[[note]]Digger Judy Goldhaft-Berg used to teach tie-dye at the "Trip Without A Ticket" free store in early '67, but you didn't see a lot of it around compared to, say, embroidery or appliques.[[/note]] The tie-dyed shtick is probably either {{Flanderization}} of a minor fad or marketers confusing the hippie subculture with the "glitter rock" and disco subcultures of the '70s.

Added DiffLines:

* Captain Trips, the hippie superhero from the [[Literature/WildCards Wild Cards novels]].


* Hippies were often portrayed, usually pretty badly, on LiveActionTV/DrugsAreBad episodes of TV series in the late 60s and early 70s. The UsefulNotes/RichardNixon Admin had a hand in ensuring that hippies and drug use were shown as detrimental, as Nixon attempted to discredit the UsefulNotes/CivilRightsMovement and war protesters.

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* Hippies were often portrayed, usually pretty badly, on LiveActionTV/DrugsAreBad DrugsAreBad/LiveActionTV episodes of TV series in the late 60s and early 70s. The UsefulNotes/RichardNixon Admin had a hand in ensuring that hippies and drug use were shown as detrimental, as Nixon attempted to discredit the UsefulNotes/CivilRightsMovement and war protesters.


Naturally, this growing mainstream attention, especially by hangers-on who came for the drugs and the sex, led to a different, more negative hippie stereotype emerging by TheSeventies, especially as incidents like the [[Film/GimmeShelter Altamont disaster]] and the [[UsefulNotes/CharlesManson Manson Family murders]] showed Americans a dark side to the hippie movement. These hippies, instead of [[FreeLoveFuture free-love idealists]] who [[HigherUnderstandingThroughDrugs expanded their minds through psychoactive drugs]], were portrayed as burnouts under the sway of drug pushers, gangsters, and {{cult}} leaders who wished to exploit them both financially and sexually. Oftentimes, they were seen as susceptible to [[DirtyCommunists extreme leftist political ideologies]] as well. While there was some TruthInTelevision to this, many "New Left" activists of that era actually shared the disdain that the "squares" held for the hippie movement, albeit for very different reasons: they saw the hippies not as dangerous radicals shredding public morals and the fabric of society, but as [[ApatheticCitizens politically and socially apathetic]] and unwilling to actually face the problems in the world as opposed to withdrawing from it into their own communes and societies. Music/GilScottHeron, in his 1970 poem [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qGaoXAwl9kw "The Revolution Will Not Be Televised"]], famously castigated the hippies as drones engaging in a hollow rebellion, NotSoDifferent from the mainstream society they rejected, who would likely try to sit on the sidelines when the ''real'' revolution came, reworking the famous slogan used to define the hippie culture into "plug in, turn on, and cop out".

to:

Naturally, this growing mainstream attention, especially by hangers-on who came for the drugs and the sex, led to a different, more negative hippie stereotype emerging by TheSeventies, especially as incidents like the [[Film/GimmeShelter Altamont disaster]] and the [[UsefulNotes/CharlesManson Manson Family murders]] showed Americans a dark side to the hippie movement. These hippies, instead of [[FreeLoveFuture free-love idealists]] who [[HigherUnderstandingThroughDrugs expanded their minds through psychoactive drugs]], were portrayed as burnouts under the sway of drug pushers, gangsters, and {{cult}} leaders who wished to exploit them both financially and sexually. Oftentimes, they were seen as susceptible to [[DirtyCommunists extreme leftist political ideologies]] as well. While there was some TruthInTelevision to this, many "New Left" activists of that era actually shared the disdain that the "squares" held for the hippie movement, albeit for very different reasons: they saw the hippies not as dangerous radicals shredding public morals and the fabric of society, but as [[ApatheticCitizens politically and socially apathetic]] and unwilling to actually face the problems in the world as opposed to withdrawing from it into their own communes and societies. Music/GilScottHeron, in his 1970 poem [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qGaoXAwl9kw "The Revolution Will Not Be Televised"]], famously castigated the hippies as drones engaging in a hollow rebellion, NotSoDifferent from the mainstream society they rejected, rebellion who would likely try to sit on the sidelines when the ''real'' revolution came, reworking NotSoDifferent from the mainstream society they rejected, and reworked the famous slogan used to define the hippie culture into "plug in, turn on, and [[SellOut cop out".
out]]".


By the time the CBS News crews arrived to film ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QJkSK_nU9Ik The Hippie Temptation]]'', the documentary that gave most Americans their first glimpse of Music/TheGratefulDead, the Haight had been overrun with thousands of bewildered kids, most of the men [[https://ww2.kqed.org/arts/2017/09/20/the-summer-of-crap-peter-coyote-on-vietnam-and-life-in-the-60s/ rightfully apprehensive of the draft and being sent off to die]] in UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar, and looking for a better world than the artificial StepfordSmiler suburbs.[[note]]"Another Pleasant Valley Sunday, here in status symbol land..."[[/note]] Only a few caught onto what was really happening and pulled themselves into a good understanding. Most had come assuming the subculture was an already-existing {{Utopia}}[[note]]A certain song by Scott [=McKenzie=] -- actually written as a promo for the Monterey Pop Festival -- didn't help things any.[[/note]] instead of [[http://www.aliciabaylaurel.com/whatdidthehippieswant a work in progress]]. [[http://www.diggers.org/freefall/freefall.html The key word being "work."]] [[note]]Greg Castillo's essay "[[http://www.roomonethousand.com/6-work Counterculture Materialized]]" shows that hippies were not lazy but rather changed ideas and methods of work.[[/note]] [[https://bampfa.org/program/hippie-modernism-struggle-utopia Key elements of the hippie counter/subculture]] are an integral part of modern society, including [[http://members.aye.net/~hippie/hippie/special_.htm what you're reading this on]].

The earliest instances of this trope come only a few years after the first hippies, man. For a while contemporary depictions either confused hippies with {{beatnik}}s or just portrayed them being, [[LikeIsLikeAComma like]], generically weird. It's like TheNewRockAndRoll, dude, except the hippie "messed-up" phase never ended. Whoah.

to:

By the time the CBS News crews arrived to film ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QJkSK_nU9Ik The Hippie Temptation]]'', the documentary that gave most Americans their first glimpse of Music/TheGratefulDead, the Haight had been overrun with thousands of bewildered kids, most of the men [[https://ww2.kqed.org/arts/2017/09/20/the-summer-of-crap-peter-coyote-on-vietnam-and-life-in-the-60s/ rightfully apprehensive of the draft and being sent off to die]] in UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar, and looking for a better world than the artificial StepfordSmiler suburbs.[[note]]"Another Pleasant Valley Sunday, here in status symbol land..."[[/note]] Only a few caught onto what was really happening and pulled themselves into a good understanding. Most had come assuming the subculture was an already-existing {{Utopia}}[[note]]A certain song by Scott [=McKenzie=] -- actually written as a promo for the Monterey Pop Festival -- didn't help things any.[[/note]] instead of [[http://www.aliciabaylaurel.com/whatdidthehippieswant a work in progress]]. [[http://www.diggers.org/freefall/freefall.html The key word being "work."]] [[note]]Greg Castillo's essay "[[http://www.roomonethousand.com/6-work Counterculture Materialized]]" shows that hippies were not lazy but rather changed ideas and methods of work.[[/note]] [[/note]]

Naturally, this growing mainstream attention, especially by hangers-on who came for the drugs and the sex, led to a different, more negative hippie stereotype emerging by TheSeventies, especially as incidents like the [[Film/GimmeShelter Altamont disaster]] and the [[UsefulNotes/CharlesManson Manson Family murders]] showed Americans a dark side to the hippie movement. These hippies, instead of [[FreeLoveFuture free-love idealists]] who [[HigherUnderstandingThroughDrugs expanded their minds through psychoactive drugs]], were portrayed as burnouts under the sway of drug pushers, gangsters, and {{cult}} leaders who wished to exploit them both financially and sexually. Oftentimes, they were seen as susceptible to [[DirtyCommunists extreme leftist political ideologies]] as well. While there was some TruthInTelevision to this, many "New Left" activists of that era actually shared the disdain that the "squares" held for the hippie movement, albeit for very different reasons: they saw the hippies not as dangerous radicals shredding public morals and the fabric of society, but as [[ApatheticCitizens politically and socially apathetic]] and unwilling to actually face the problems in the world as opposed to withdrawing from it into their own communes and societies. Music/GilScottHeron, in his 1970 poem [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qGaoXAwl9kw "The Revolution Will Not Be Televised"]], famously castigated the hippies as drones engaging in a hollow rebellion, NotSoDifferent from the mainstream society they rejected, who would likely try to sit on the sidelines when the ''real'' revolution came, reworking the famous slogan used to define the hippie culture into "plug in, turn on, and cop out".

While the hippies eventually faded from mainstream attention by TheEighties,
[[https://bampfa.org/program/hippie-modernism-struggle-utopia Key key elements of the hippie counter/subculture]] are an went on to become integral part parts of modern society, including [[http://members.aye.net/~hippie/hippie/special_.htm what you're reading this on]].

on.]] The ideals of the Haight-Ashbury counterculture heavily impacted the technology industry that arose in nearby Stanford and Silicon Valley, and with it the related hacker and computer cultures of the late 20th century, bringing to them a broadly anti-authoritarian culture, a belief in changing the world through technology, and the ideal that InformationWantsToBeFree. Timothy Leary, the LSD guru who coined the hippie slogan "turn on, tune in, and drop out", even celebrated the personal computer as the new LSD late in his life, and came up with a new, CyberPunk variation on his old saying: "turn on, boot up, jack in". Ironically, many of the original hippies scorned computers as tools of centralized control, but the hackers saw them quite differently.

The earliest instances of this trope come only a few years after the first hippies, man. For a while while, contemporary depictions either confused hippies with {{beatnik}}s or just portrayed them being, [[LikeIsLikeAComma like]], generically weird. It's like TheNewRockAndRoll, dude, except the hippie "messed-up" phase never ended. Whoah.
ended.



* Angar the Screamer from Marvel comics is a subversion who varies from bad satire to FridgeHorror DependingOnTheWriter. His costume looks like a stereotypical hippie outfit, but he's violent, materialistic and generally evil, and instead of using hallucinogens himself to tune in, turn on and drop out, his screams induce horrifying hallucinations in the people who hear them. In one case, he made a heroine's father hallucinate such horrifying things about her that he developed trauma-induced amnesia: he blocked out all memory of the part of his life during which his daughter existed. Like, bad trip, man.

to:

* Angar the Screamer from Marvel comics is a subversion villainous example who varies from bad satire to FridgeHorror DependingOnTheWriter. His costume looks like a stereotypical hippie outfit, but he's violent, materialistic and generally evil, and instead of using hallucinogens himself to tune in, turn on and drop out, his screams induce horrifying hallucinations in the people who hear them. In one case, he made a heroine's father hallucinate such horrifying things about her that he developed trauma-induced amnesia: he blocked out all memory of the part of his life during which his daughter existed. Like, bad trip, man.

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