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** ''Warlords of Draenor'' saw the introduction of the WOW token, allowing players to extend their subscription with in-game gold. Later on, the WOW token could also be exchanged for store credit, to buy mounts and other collectibles from the Blizzard store.


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** ''Battle for Azeroth'' took it UpToEleven with the brutosaur mount. It has a portable auction house on it and costs ''5,000,000 gold''.


* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIV'' has gear durability that goes down after a battle and you suffer massive stat penalties if your gear breaks. You can repair the gear yourself, though depending on the type of gear, you'll need to be in a specific job class and level to repair the item. Alternatively, you can just find an NPC mender who can repair your items all at once for a small fee. The game also has housing for free companies (player formed groups) that are nothing more than a place to hang out, but even the smallest plot of land can run you for several ''million'' gil.

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* Even though ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIV'' has [[GlobalCurrencyException loads and loads of alternative currencies]], it still have a lot of MoneySink for their [[GlobalCurrency Gil]].
** First and foremost, from ''A Realm Reborn'' onwards, the player's Teleport spell is no longer time-gated by Anima points, but the teleportation fee is collected after a successful teleportation. From Stormblood onwards, teleporting to another continent and beyond would cost 999 gil.
** Secondly, player's
gear durability that goes will gradually wear down after a battle and if it reaches zero, you will suffer massive stat penalties if your gear breaks.penalties. You can repair the gear yourself, though depending on the type of gear, you'll need to be in a specific job class and level to repair the item. Alternatively, you can just find an NPC mender who can repair your items all at once for a small fee. The fee.
** And finally, the
game also has housing for free companies (player formed groups) that are nothing more than a place to hang out, but even the smallest plot of land can run you for several ''million'' gil.


** The gambling challenges which often rely on exact conditions to win. Like challenge #4 where you have to bust someone out in three different poker stations. The hands quickly get expensive and you usually have to go all in yourself to bust out. The Saint Denis location for poker is $5 and the hands can quickly get up into the $20 range. The most notorious of these challenges is #8 where you have to beat the dealer in Black Jack by hitting exactly three times. NintendoHard doesn't even begin to explain it. Even if you're betting small amounts, the total racks up quickly and it could very well you six hours worth of play to get the challenge.

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** The gambling challenges which often rely on exact conditions to win. Like challenge #4 where you have to bust someone out in three different poker stations. The hands quickly get expensive and you usually have to go all in yourself to bust someone out. The Saint Denis location for poker is a $5 buy in and the hands can quickly get up into the $20 range. The most notorious of these challenges is #8 where you have to beat the dealer in Black Jack by hitting exactly three times. NintendoHard doesn't even begin to explain it. Even if you're betting small amounts, the total racks up quickly and it could very well you six hours worth of play to get the challenge.

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* ''VideoGame/RedDeadRedemption2'' :
** The most elite horses will cost you over $1,000 which is about $30,000 in today's dollar. Luckily you can find an Arabian (fastest horse in the game) in the wild as soon as the map opens up in chapter 2 that can last you for the entire main game if you want. However, if you want another type of elite horse, you will have to pay for it. Your main horse dies towards the end of the main story and the ones in the stables also don't carry over to the PlayableEpilogue . The wild arabian won't respawn so if you want another, you'll have to buy it.
** The gambling challenges which often rely on exact conditions to win. Like challenge #4 where you have to bust someone out in three different poker stations. The hands quickly get expensive and you usually have to go all in yourself to bust out. The Saint Denis location for poker is $5 and the hands can quickly get up into the $20 range. The most notorious of these challenges is #8 where you have to beat the dealer in Black Jack by hitting exactly three times. NintendoHard doesn't even begin to explain it. Even if you're betting small amounts, the total racks up quickly and it could very well you six hours worth of play to get the challenge.

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** Pre-2nd Edition (and replicated in many retroclones), characters gain experience points equal to the sum of the gold they bring out of the dungeon - the main method of XP at the time, in fact, rather than killing monsters. A common houserule is to hold back the XP until the money is ''spent'' on something suitably useless, such as carousing or philanthropy.


*** The ''Heartfire'' DLC allows you to purchase land and build your own house from the ground up. Once again, it is quite costly, but you can at least find many of the building materials yourself to save money. You can build anything from a simple one-room cabin-like house to full blown mansions with dedicated trophy rooms, {{Mage Tower}}s, libraries, shrines to the gods of your choosing, and much more.

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*** The ''Heartfire'' ''Hearthfire'' DLC allows you to purchase land and build your own house from the ground up. Once again, it is quite costly, but you can at least find many of the building materials yourself to save money. You can build anything from a simple one-room cabin-like house to full blown mansions with dedicated trophy rooms, {{Mage Tower}}s, libraries, shrines to the gods of your choosing, and much more.

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*** The money sinks ended up being so minimal that the original in-game currency(gold/platinum) became effectively worthless, with many players walking around carrying the absolute maximum amount of currency possible and entire freemium accounts being added just to act as currency mules. The game then added a new form of currency that has to be bought with real money, but the meta has shifted largely to bound-to-account items and no real game in-economy currently exists.

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** The Mystic Forge. Some recipes for converting items requires the use of items that can only be bought from a nearby NPC.


* VideoGame/{{Yakuza 0}} has the upgrade system, where you pour increasingly absurd amounts of money (all the way up to half a billion yen) into increasing the stats and abilities of your various [[StanceSystem stances.]] There's also the Cabaret Club Czar and Real Estate Royale (''especially'' the latter) side-quests, where you need to pour money into getting local businesses to sponsor your cabaret club or buy them outright, though these two are also your two biggest revenue streams in the game, so pouring money into them nets you more money in the long-term.



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* VideoGame/{{Yakuza 0}} has the upgrade system, where you pour increasingly absurd amounts of money (all the way up to half a billion yen) into increasing the stats and abilities of your various [[StanceSystem stances.]] There's also the Cabaret Club Czar and Real Estate Royale (''especially'' the latter) side-quests, where you need to pour money into getting local businesses to sponsor your cabaret club or buy them outright, though these two are also your two biggest revenue streams in the game, so pouring money into them nets you more money in the long-term.


* The Gold Clock in ''Stardew Valley'' prevents decay of the fences and debris from spawning, which especially on the first day of a season saves a lot of time and energy. However, it is also the most expensive object in the game by far, costing 10 mil (for comparison, the second most expensive object is only 2 mil). By the time you can afford it, your energy meter will have been maxed out and good food become affordable, most of the terrain will have already been built on (eliminating them as debris spawn points), and the fruit trees will have been fully grown (debris prevents them from growing). In short, at that point it's more of a trophy to show off your earnings than a tool.

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* The Gold Clock in ''Stardew Valley'' ''VideoGame/StardewValley'' prevents decay of the fences and debris from spawning, which especially on the first day of a season saves a lot of time and energy. However, it is also the most expensive object in the game by far, costing 10 mil (for comparison, the second most expensive object is only 2 mil). By the time you can afford it, your energy meter will have been maxed out and good food become affordable, most of the terrain will have already been built on (eliminating them as debris spawn points), and the fruit trees will have been fully grown (debris prevents them from growing). In short, at that point it's more of a trophy to show off your earnings than a tool.


** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaBreathOfTheWild'' has jewelry and the armor pieces, where some of them cost 2000 rupees. Purchasing Ancient weaponry is also really expensive. Bows, melee weapons and shields cost 1000 rupees a piece, while arrows cost at least 80 rupees per arrow (if you buy the bundle of 5). And unlocking the final Fairy Fountain will cost you a whopping 10.000 rupees! Luckily, there are a lot options to earn rupees really fast.

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** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaBreathOfTheWild'' has jewelry and the armor pieces, where some of them cost 2000 rupees. Purchasing Ancient weaponry is also really expensive. Bows, melee weapons and shields cost 1000 rupees a piece, while arrows cost at least 80 rupees per arrow (if you buy the bundle of 5). And unlocking the final Fairy Fountain will cost you a whopping 10.000 rupees! Luckily, there are a lot of options to earn rupees really fast.




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* The Gold Clock in ''Stardew Valley'' prevents decay of the fences and debris from spawning, which especially on the first day of a season saves a lot of time and energy. However, it is also the most expensive object in the game by far, costing 10 mil (for comparison, the second most expensive object is only 2 mil). By the time you can afford it, your energy meter will have been maxed out and good food become affordable, most of the terrain will have already been built on (eliminating them as debris spawn points), and the fruit trees will have been fully grown (debris prevents them from growing). In short, at that point it's more of a trophy to show off your earnings than a tool.

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** In the MMORPG version, ''DungeonsAndDragonsOnline'', wealth comes mainly from found treasure which can be sold to other players. This is done through (a) pawnshops, who'd buy your unwanted treasure cheap, and sell it to other players at a markup, and (b) the Auction House, which a charges a handling fee of about 30%.
*** In addition, the game institute a crafting system. To get the necessary materials, you have to disassemble your unwanted loot rather than selling it for gold. (As a result, the pawnshop's shelves have been bare for years. Player would rather craft.)


Exists almost solely to [[AvertedTrope avert]] MoneyForNothing. See CashGate for when this is required to advance in the game.

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Exists almost solely to [[AvertedTrope avert]] MoneyForNothing. See CashGate for when this is required to advance in the game. Not to be confused with CrackIsCheaper.


** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkToThePast'' has the Pond of Happiness, where Link can toss in rupees in increments of 5 or 20 at a time. For every 100 rupees he throws in, a fairy will increase the maximum amount of bombs or arrows he can carry. Since most of the [[CashGate Cash Gates]] are cleared within the first half of the game, this gives the player something useful to do with the rest of it.
** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheWindWaker'' has Tingle, who requires you to [[CashGate spend 398 rupees]] ''eight times'' in order to complete the Triforce quest. Also, getting the Island Merchants' items (which also gives you the magic armor and a Piece of Heart) also means using lots of rupees if you're aiming for 100% Completion, since you always have to pay a value difference between the item you're trading and the item you're receiving. The HD remake does away with most of the Triforce Charts (five shards out of eight are qcquired directly), but since the Magic Armor doesn't drain magic anymore, it instead takes away rupees every time you get hit, which means the more rupees you have, the longer you'll stay protected.

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** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkToThePast'' has the Pond of Happiness, where Link can toss in rupees in increments of varying between 5 or 20 to 50 at a time. For every 100 rupees he throws in, a fairy will increase the maximum amount of bombs or arrows he can carry. Since most of the [[CashGate Cash Gates]] are cleared within the first half of the game, this gives the player something useful to do with the rest of it.
it. Eight upgrades can be "bought" for each item, allowing to spend a maximum of 1600 rupees to bring your bomb and arrow capacity up from 10 and 30 respectively to 50 and 70.
** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheWindWaker'' has Tingle, who requires you to [[CashGate spend 398 rupees]] ''eight times'' in order to complete the Triforce quest. Also, getting the Island Merchants' items (which also gives you the magic armor and a Piece of Heart) also means using lots of rupees if you're aiming for 100% Completion, since you always have to pay a value difference between the item you're trading and the item you're receiving. The HD remake does away with most of the Triforce Charts (five shards out of eight are qcquired acquired directly), but since the Magic Armor doesn't drain magic anymore, it instead takes away rupees every time you get hit, which means the more rupees you have, the longer you'll stay protected.

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