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* In ''Series/KamenRiderOOO'', Kamen Rider Birth uses a HUD similar to ''Iron Man's'', showing it's technological origins as opposed to OOO's mystical one.

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* In ''Series/KamenRiderOOO'', Kamen Rider Birth uses a HUD similar to ''Iron Man's'', showing it's technological origins as opposed to OOO's mystical one. Given the time frame, it's clear that ''Iron Man'' was an inspiration for this
** The equally tech-based Riders of ''[[Series/KamenRiderDrive Drive]]'' and ''[[Series/KamenRiderBuild Build]]'' would also occasionally show the view behind the helmet, with equally similar ''Iron Man''-style HUDs. [[AvertedTrope Averted]] with Kamen Rider Chaser from the former series, as, though he's also technical, his human form is merely a facade that he just shifts out of from when he transforms.








* ''Literature/TheExpanse'' features {{powered armour}}s with [=HUDs=] programmable on the fly.
* In ''Literature/NoSuchThingAsWerewolves'' Mohn Corps issues it's higher ranked soldiers shades that provide them with a tactical HUD.



* A ''Franchise/StarWars'' example is in ''Literature/LegacyOfTheForce'', where Creator/KarenTraviss is more than a little obsessed with the HUD inside Boba Fett's helmet. Unsurprisingly, she's the one [[VideoGame/RepublicCommandoSeriesLiterature responsible for those awesome guys]] from ''VideoGame/StarWarsRepublicCommando'' (mentioned in the "Video Games" section) being more than just one-off characters.
* in ''Literature/NoSuchThingAsWerewolves'' Mohn Corps issues it's higher ranked soldiers shades that provide them with a tactical HUD.

to:

* A ''Franchise/StarWars'' example is in ''Literature/LegacyOfTheForce'', where Creator/KarenTraviss is more than a little obsessed with the HUD inside Boba Fett's helmet. Unsurprisingly, she's the one [[VideoGame/RepublicCommandoSeriesLiterature [[Literature/RepublicCommandoSeries responsible for those awesome guys]] from ''VideoGame/StarWarsRepublicCommando'' (mentioned in the "Video Games" section) being more than just one-off characters.
* in ''Literature/NoSuchThingAsWerewolves'' Mohn Corps issues it's higher ranked soldiers shades that provide them with a tactical HUD.
characters.






* In ''Series/KamenRiderOOO'', Kamen Rider Birth uses a HUD similar to ''Iron Man's'', showing it's technological origins as opposed to OOO's mystical one.



* In ''Series/KamenRiderOOO'', Kamen Rider Birth uses a HUD similar to ''Iron Man's'', showing it's technological origins as opposed to OOO's mystical one.




[[folder:Diegetic versions]]

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\n[[folder:Diegetic [[folder:Video Game: Diegetic versions]]



** ''VideoGame/StarWarsRepublicCommando'' also has the HUD as the electronic display inside the player's helmet. EMP grenades can disrupt this or cover the screen with noise. Most awesomely, the front of the helmet has some sort of energy ''windshield wiper'' that cleans your HUD of obstructions - usually splattered blood from an enemy after a punch-dagger to the face. It's also probably one of the only [=HUDs=] where you can actually see the inside of your helmet.

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** * ''VideoGame/StarWarsRepublicCommando'' also has the features HUD as the electronic display inside the player's helmet. EMP grenades can disrupt this or cover the screen with noise. Most awesomely, the front of the helmet has some sort of energy ''windshield wiper'' that cleans your HUD of obstructions - usually splattered blood from an enemy after a punch-dagger to the face. It's also probably one of the only [=HUDs=] where you can actually see the inside of your helmet.



[[/folder]]

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[[/folder]][[/folder]]
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* In ''VideoGame/Doom2016'' the HUD is explained as being a function of the Praetor suit, and visibly displays functions such as calibration, impact compensation, tether installation and indicating low health.


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* In the ''VideoGame/HalfLife'' series, the HUD is explained as being a feature of the HEV suit, hence why your hud doesn't appear until putting it on.


You will be shocked to learn that HUD has nothing to do with the Creator/PaulNewman movie of the same name, which is about a ranching family. The United States' [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Housing_and_Urban_Development Department of Housing and Urban Development]] is ''right out''.

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You will be shocked to learn that HUD has nothing to do with the Creator/PaulNewman [[Film/{{Hud}} movie of the same name, name]], which is about a ranching family. The United States' [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Housing_and_Urban_Development Department of Housing and Urban Development]] is ''right out''.



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[[folder:Comic Books]]
* The lenses of ComicBook/{{Batman}}'s cowl have the ability to show him certain things in a head's-up-display only visible to the wearer, prominently shown in the BatmanColdOpen of ''ComicBook/BatmanHush''. The other Bat-backed and supplied Gotham vigilantes also have them.
* ''ComicBook/RobinSeries'': Jaeger's goggles have a heads-up-display through which he can control his drones in order to spy on and follow his prey. It also helps with targeting.
[[/folder]]



* Most [[SimulationGame combat flight simulators]] will naturally at least try to emulate a real-life military-style HUD:
%% Examples are not general? But I'll allow it?
** ''VideoGame/AbsoluteZero'' had an interesting justification in its [[AllThereInTheManual fluff]] for the HUD, and even for the 1st-person cockpit graphics. Instead of actually having windows or internal displays, the pilot cabins and such in all of the vehicles are windowless and featureless. Instead of windows, the pilot wears a VR helmet, which is fed by cameras and other sensors to make a composite of the world outside the vehicle. To keep the pilot from being disoriented, a virtual cockpit with windows and instruments is inserted into the augmented reality.
** ''VideoGame/AceCombat'' series models [=HUDs=] for military fighter planes on the actual fighter planes. However, the ability overreaches, as the player is able to see targeting boxes around enemy targets at any point in the cockpit, not just through the HUD. This include third person perspectives.
** ''VideoGame/OverGFighters'': The [=HUD=] may be toggled (as a view mode) between ''Ace Combat'' style and a realistic HUD where all of the information ''is'' displayed on the transparent panel.
* PoweredArmor: Just about any game with it have a HUD {{justified|Trope}} by being overlaid on a helmet visor:
%% Examples are not general? But I'll allow it??
** ''VideoGame/AzraelsTear'' also outfits the PlayerCharacter with a nifty suit of PoweredArmor, and the HUD will even visibly list off its attempts to resuscitate its wearer in the event of death.
** In ''VideoGame/{{Crysis}}'', the player's entire view is apparently electronic, and is distorted by close proximity to aliens or a near miss with a gauss rifle. The HUD itself has a loading screen that is shown when the suit is activated. It can also be disabled by a disruption grenade in multiplayer, removing all of its functionality.
** ''Franchise/DeadSpace'': is an unusual third-person example with no HUD at all. The health meter is represented by the lights along the back of the character's suit, remaining ammo in a gun is shown through a display on the gun itself, and the inventory display is actually projected by the character's suit, with the protagonist looking at the various item boxes and physically pointing to the item he wants to use. The point of the latter is debatable, since the items are kept in HammerSpace.
** Entering a suit of it in ''VideoGame/Fallout4'' will transform your HUD into a DiegeticInterface, with your ammo counter in a corner of the helmet and your AP, health, and Geiger counters as gauges along the bottom edge. In addition, there's another gauge tracking how much charge is left in the fusion core powering the armor, and a small screen off to the side tracking your armor's condition, with parts needing repair highlighted in red and missing/broken armor parts blank. Your Pip-Boy menu, which usually brings your wrist-mounted Pip-Boy up to your eye level when you open it, is now a window that pops up on your helmet's HUD. Also, your Pip-Boy flashlight (which provides illumination by brightening the Pip-Boy's screen) is replaced with a built-in helmet light, so if you're not wearing your power armor's helmet, you can't access either flashlight.
** ''Franchise/{{Halo}}''. Especially notable in that from ''VideoGame/{{Halo 3}}'' onward, the HUD loses its curvature when the camera goes third-person.
** All of the ''VideoGame/MechWarrior'' games have a HUD of some form to display information regarding aspects of your 'mech and enemy units.
** ''VideoGame/MetroidPrime'''s display is meant to be the HUD inside Samus's helmet. This is reinforced by the fact that the edges of the helmet's visor are visible around the borders of the screen, water or steam occasionally accumulates on the display, and certain flashes of light can actually cause the player character's reflection to become momentarily visible in the screen, making Samus one of the few FPS heroes to have reaction shots. ''VideoGame/MetroidPrime2Echoes'' even includes an enemy that can crash Samus's computer systems, causing screen updates to become jerky, random letters to scroll up the screen, and weapons to be disabled until you "reboot" with a button command.

to:

* Most [[SimulationGame combat flight simulators]] will naturally at least try to emulate a real-life military-style HUD:
%% Examples are not general? But I'll allow it?
**
''VideoGame/AbsoluteZero'' had an interesting justification in its [[AllThereInTheManual fluff]] for the HUD, and even for the 1st-person cockpit graphics. Instead of actually having windows or internal displays, the pilot cabins and such in all of the vehicles are windowless and featureless. Instead of windows, the pilot wears a VR helmet, which is fed by cameras and other sensors to make a composite of the world outside the vehicle. To keep the pilot from being disoriented, a virtual cockpit with windows and instruments is inserted into the augmented reality.
** * ''VideoGame/AceCombat'' series models [=HUDs=] for military fighter planes on the actual fighter planes. However, the ability overreaches, as the player is able to see targeting boxes around enemy targets at any point in the cockpit, not just through the HUD. This include third person perspectives.
** * ''VideoGame/OverGFighters'': The [=HUD=] may be toggled (as a view mode) between ''Ace Combat'' style and a realistic HUD where all of the information ''is'' displayed on the transparent panel.
* PoweredArmor: Just about any game with it have a HUD {{justified|Trope}} by being overlaid on a helmet visor:
%% Examples are not general? But I'll allow it??
**
''VideoGame/AzraelsTear'' also outfits the PlayerCharacter with a nifty suit of PoweredArmor, and the HUD will even visibly list off its attempts to resuscitate its wearer in the event of death.
** * In ''VideoGame/{{Crysis}}'', the player's entire view is apparently electronic, and is distorted by close proximity to aliens or a near miss with a gauss rifle. The HUD itself has a loading screen that is shown when the suit is activated. It can also be disabled by a disruption grenade in multiplayer, removing all of its functionality.
** * ''Franchise/DeadSpace'': is an unusual third-person example with no HUD at all. The health meter is represented by the lights along the back of the character's suit, remaining ammo in a gun is shown through a display on the gun itself, and the inventory display is actually projected by the character's suit, with the protagonist looking at the various item boxes and physically pointing to the item he wants to use. The point of the latter is debatable, since the items are kept in HammerSpace.
** * Entering a suit of it in ''VideoGame/Fallout4'' will transform your HUD into a DiegeticInterface, with your ammo counter in a corner of the helmet and your AP, health, and Geiger counters as gauges along the bottom edge. In addition, there's another gauge tracking how much charge is left in the fusion core powering the armor, and a small screen off to the side tracking your armor's condition, with parts needing repair highlighted in red and missing/broken armor parts blank. Your Pip-Boy menu, which usually brings your wrist-mounted Pip-Boy up to your eye level when you open it, is now a window that pops up on your helmet's HUD. Also, your Pip-Boy flashlight (which provides illumination by brightening the Pip-Boy's screen) is replaced with a built-in helmet light, so if you're not wearing your power armor's helmet, you can't access either flashlight.
** * ''Franchise/{{Halo}}''. Especially notable in that from ''VideoGame/{{Halo 3}}'' onward, the HUD loses its curvature when the camera goes third-person.
** * All of the ''VideoGame/MechWarrior'' games have a HUD of some form to display information regarding aspects of your 'mech and enemy units.
** * ''VideoGame/MetroidPrime'''s display is meant to be the HUD inside Samus's helmet. This is reinforced by the fact that the edges of the helmet's visor are visible around the borders of the screen, water or steam occasionally accumulates on the display, and certain flashes of light can actually cause the player character's reflection to become momentarily visible in the screen, making Samus one of the few FPS heroes to have reaction shots. ''VideoGame/MetroidPrime2Echoes'' even includes an enemy that can crash Samus's computer systems, causing screen updates to become jerky, random letters to scroll up the screen, and weapons to be disabled until you "reboot" with a button command.


Though very different technologically, the term is frequently used in the context of video games to describe a style of user interface where supplemental data is overlaid directly onto the MainWindow rather than being separated into a different display panel. This allows the MainWindow to occupy the entire viewport of the game. The name probably originated with the fact that the earliest uses of this design were in flight simulators, where an actual HUD was being emulated. A video game HUD may be {{diegetic|Interface}}, meaning that it is actually part of the in-game world and visible to the character (more common in sci-fi), or just for the player's benefit.

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Though very different technologically, the term is frequently used in the context of video games to describe a style of user interface where supplemental data is overlaid directly onto the MainWindow main window rather than being separated into a different display panel. This allows the MainWindow main window to occupy the entire viewport of the game. The name probably originated with the fact that the earliest uses of this design were in flight simulators, where an actual HUD was being emulated. A video game HUD may be {{diegetic|Interface}}, meaning that it is actually part of the in-game world and visible to the character (more common in sci-fi), or just for the player's benefit.


* ''Film/StarTrekIntoDarkness'': [[TheCaptain Kirk]] and [[BigBad Khan]] space-jump in suits with [=HUDs=] to guide them--until Kirk's helmet gets hit by a rock and the display fails.

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* ''Film/StarTrekIntoDarkness'': [[TheCaptain Kirk]] and [[BigBad Khan]] space-jump in suits with [=HUDs=] to guide them--until Kirk's helmet gets hit by a rock debris and the display fails.

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* ''Project Itoh: Genocidal Organ''. The {{Super Soldier}}s take eyedrops of nanomachines which overlay the required information on their vision.


* ''Series/BlakesSeven''. Shown in the TitleSequence of Season D, from the POV of a spacecraft flying across an asteroid.

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* ''Series/BlakesSeven''. Shown in the TitleSequence of Season D, from the POV of a spacecraft flying across an asteroid.above and then away from a desolate planet.

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* ''Series/BlakesSeven''. Shown in the TitleSequence of Season D, from the POV of a spacecraft flying across an asteroid.


* ''SpaceHulk: Deathwing'' does this, with a unique little detail. Every other minute or so, your suit's displays will flicker and glitch a moment before rebooting themselves. It's a clever little nod to the fact that the Terminator Armor you are lumbering around in is magnatudes older than the already centuries old Space Marines inside them, and the inner workings are showing their age.

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* ''SpaceHulk: ''VideoGame/SpaceHulk: Deathwing'' does this, with a unique little detail. Every other minute or so, your suit's displays will flicker and glitch a moment before rebooting themselves. It's a clever little nod to the fact that the Terminator Armor you are lumbering around in is magnatudes older than the already centuries old Space Marines inside them, and the inner workings are showing their age.


* in "Literature/NoSuchThingAsWerewolves" Mohn Corps issues it's higher ranked soldiers shades that provide them with a tactical HUD.

to:

* in "Literature/NoSuchThingAsWerewolves" ''Literature/NoSuchThingAsWerewolves'' Mohn Corps issues it's higher ranked soldiers shades that provide them with a tactical HUD.

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* in "Literature/NoSuchThingAsWerewolves" Mohn Corps issues it's higher ranked soldiers shades that provide them with a tactical HUD.

Added DiffLines:

* ''SpaceHulk: Deathwing'' does this, with a unique little detail. Every other minute or so, your suit's displays will flicker and glitch a moment before rebooting themselves. It's a clever little nod to the fact that the Terminator Armor you are lumbering around in is magnatudes older than the already centuries old Space Marines inside them, and the inner workings are showing their age.

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